Students Staff

NEwComERs - Network for Early Career Essex Researchers

Research Lifecycle

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Find out more about the stages of the research lifecycle in this Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) paper.

Our Network for Early Career Essex Researchers – NEwComERs provides support researchers in the early stages of their careers, e.g. newly-appointed lecturers, post-docs, research fellows and final year PhD students.

NEwComERs creates a forum that brings together researchers interested in the different aspects of the research lifecycle and aims to stimulate collaboration and opportunities for shared learning and interdisciplinary work. The network also provides training and resources to support researchers across the research lifecycle from the UK Data Archive, the Research and Enterprise Office, Library and the EssexLab.

The Network aims to organise a wide range of workshops that foster professional development using informal, stimulating and highly participative sessions that generate new ideas and practical approaches to data management, publishing research results as well as gaining funding for your research.

NEwComERs training programme - January 2018

To kick off the NEwComERs network we have developed a one week training programme that consists of training sessions covering various elements of the support services available at the University. The programme will run from Monday 8 January to Friday 12 January 2018 and will be delivered by colleagues from the UK Data Archive, the Research and Enterprise Office, the Library and colleagues from other University sections as well as external providers such as Elsevier. Several sessions will run in parallel and will take place at the Essex Business School, affording delegates the opportunity to choose relevant training courses and to meet with peers and network with colleagues.

Participants can pick and choose workshops relevant to them. To book individual courses on Proficio please follow the links provided in the programme below.

The programme will kick off on 8 January at 11am in the Essex Business School with an opening session and networking lunch introduced by our acting PVC for Research Professor Christine Raines. All participants are welcome to this session.

  • Monday 8 January

    Opening session 11.00 - 12.00 EBS2.65
    Opening of the programme by PVC Professor Christine Raines and networking lunch for all presenters and participants. Ideal opportunity to get to know researchers form different schools and departments.

    Ten things to do before publishing 12.00 – 13.00 EBS 2.65
    Start your research career with a BOOM! In this course you’ll learn tips and tricks to making your research more visible and creating more citations. We’ll give you advice based on empirical evidence and case studies with examples of good and bad practice so you’ll know exactly how to navigate in the world of publishing.

    Where to find Research Funding - Social Sciences & Humanities 12.00 – 13.00 EBS 2.41
    This introductory course provides an insight into how to find funding to support research after finishing a PhD. This course will cover available funding for postdoctoral fellowships as well as how to approach research funding in the first few years of an academic post. You will gain an oversight of the UK funding landscape in the areas of Social Sciences and Humanities.

    Where to find Research Funding - Life Sciences, maths, engineering 12.00 – 13.00 EBS 2.46
    This introductory course provides an insight into how to find funding to support research after finishing a PhD. This course will cover available funding for postdoctoral fellowships as well as how to approach research funding in the first few years of an academic post. You will gain an oversight of the UK funding landscape in the areas of Life Sciences, Mathematics, Computer Science and Engineering.

    Finding and reusing data 13.00 - 14.00 EBS 2.40
    This training session is aimed at early-career researchers and will introduce them to the resources and support available from the UK Data Service*. This will cover various elements of the research lifecycle but will focus in particular on accessing and using secondary data sources for academic research. These topics are themselves framed within the wider context of good research practice and to ensure scientific integrity.

    Open Access 13.00 - 14.00 EBS 2.68
    Open access (OA) means making research publications freely available so anyone can benefit from reading and using them. Making your research open access is increasingly required by many research funders and is also necessary for eligibility for the next REF. This brief introduction to Open Access includes: How do I do it? Why should I do it? What do I get out of it? What are funders' policies on Open Access? What is the difference between "gold" and "green" Open Access? What will my publisher allow me to put on Open Access?

  • Tuesday 9 January

    Bibliometrics 12.00 – 13.00EBS 2.65
    Bibliometrics are increasingly used in research assessment exercises and recruitment decisions as a way of measuring research impact, but they can also give you an insight into how your research is being used and interpreted by others. This session will introduce you to some commonly used bibliometrics, how they are calculated and what they mean. It will also explore two databases used to track citations; Google Scholar and Scopus. By the end of the session, you will: • Understand what bibliometrics are and what they can be used for. • Be able to use databases like Scopus and Google Scholar to explore bibliometrics relating to your own and other researcher’s publications. • Understand the strengths and limitations of using Scopus and Google Scholar to track citations.

    Encryption 12.00 – 13.00 EBS 2.41
    Each session will include a 20 minute presentation, followed by 40 minutes of practical exercises, demonstrations, discussions and Q&As. Please ensure you bring your laptop to get hands-on experience with our tools and resources. Coffee, tea and biscuits will be provided. Are you interested in how to encrypt your data or create an encrypted folder to store your digital work in? What is the best practice for creating strong passwords? This session will show you how to create strong passwords and encrypt your data using simple and free encryption programmes.*To make the most of this session, please install VeraCrypt on your laptop (Windows, MacOS or Linux) before the session. Additionally, if you have a Windows laptop you may also install AxCrypt. If you have any problems installing these programmes, please contact Dr Summers directly at ssummers@essex.ac.uk.

    How to use the media to improve your research profile 12.00 – 13.00 EBS 2.46
    So, you’re preparing to publish your research but how can you reach the people really affected by what you have to say? Working with the media and developing your profile as an academic expert on your subject through Twitter could be the key to engaging with the wider public and connecting with others in your field. We’ll explain how engaging with the media and social media can help you explain the significance of your research in a clear way to the public and others. This can also help inspire young people – particularly prospective students – to take an interest in your subject and develop key communication skills that will help with your next grant application. We’ll take the fear factor out of using social media to tell your story and build academic networks, and show how media could be your pathway to impact.

    In summary - your proposal in a nutshell 13.00 - 14.00 EBS 2.40
    Most research grants require you to write a summary. The summary may be the hardest part of the grant proposal to write because it demands completeness and brevity and capturing the reader’s attention. You must explain the main aims, objectives and importance of the proposal as simply as possible. At the same time, you must make it interesting to read, so that your proposal will stand out from all the others a reviewer might see on a typical day. Proposal summaries need to also be written using non-technical language so that they can be understood by general audiences. In this session we will review a range of proposal summaries identifying the main features of effective summaries. Participants are very welcome to bring their own examples along for review. You will also have time having a go at writing your own summary.

    Literature search 13.00 - 14.00 EBS 2.68
    This session will focus on potential resources for a comprehensive literature review across the range of sources, and how to structure searches to achieve best results. It will also look at evaluating potential sources as an intrinsic part of the literature review.

  • Wednesday 10 January

    Research Impact 12.00 – 13.00 EBS 2.65
    Understanding impact is a skill that is vital for any early career researcher who wishes to being an academic career, and is also a skill transferrable to any sector in which organisations are interested in identifying, measuring, and evaluating the effectiveness of their projects (e.g. charities, human rights groups, and other third sector organisations). The course will introduce early career researchers, including research students, to the fundamentals of this skill.

    Essex lab 12.00 – 13.00 EBS 2.41
    The ESSEXLab mission is to further the use of controlled laboratory and field experiments to study key questions in the social sciences, from foundational and methodological issues to applied research. This course will overview recent developments of experimental approaches in the social sciences. There are three main goals for this course: i) to highlight the major methodological and foundational issues of using experimental methods in the social science; ii) to look at recent developments of the experimental method in social sciences (e.g. the interaction between economics and psychology, field experiments, survey experiments); iii) to present the facilities and support researchers of the University of Essex can get from the ESSEXLab team.

    Library data - Data Sources for Postgraduate Research Students in the Social Sciences 12.00 – 13.00 EBS 2.46
    This session will focus on potential resources for social scientists across a range of disciplines who are looking for data and statistics to use in their research. It will offer an overview of some of the many databases to which the library subscribes, as well as introducing some high quality open access sources.

    Gaining consent for sharing your research data 13.00 - 14.00 EBS 2.40
    Does your research involve human participants? Do you plan to publish your data for future reuse, or does your funder expect you to do this? How do you get informed consent from your participants to do this? This session will discuss the options of one-off or process consent, and the wording to use. We will also evaluate various consent forms which researchers have used in practice. Each session will include a 20 minute presentation, followed by 40 minutes of practical exercises, demonstrations, discussions and Q&As. Please ensure you bring your laptop to get hands-on experience with our tools and resources. Coffee, tea and biscuits will be provided.

    Google for academic research 13.00 - 14.00 EBS 2.68
    This session will cover how to search Google and Google Scholar effectively. Whilst caution is often given to the merits of using Google for academic research, there exists an increasing amount of legitimate information that can be accessed via search engines. The challenge is being able to find this information amongst the huge number of results that a search returns. This session will look at how you can target and filter your search results to access the most relevant research. You will gain an understanding of how different search engines work and how you can use advanced search techniques to refine your searches to return focused results. By the end of this session you will:

    • Be able to find high quality academic material using Google.
    • Understand how Google search works.
    • Conduct advanced searches in Google and Google Scholar.
    • Use alternative search engines.
    • Use Google Scholar Library Links to find full text.

  • Thursday 11 January

    Ethical Research 12.00 – 13.00 EBS 2.65
    This course provides guidance and support to help researchers to enable them to comply with recognised best research practice. This course will cover core elements of research integrity; what constitutes research misconduct; the key principles of ethical research including handling research data. You will be provided with information to help you to avoid some of the pitfalls that exist when undertaking research.

    The Peer Review Process (delivered by Elsevier) 12.00 – 13.00 EBS 2.46
    This workshop, arranged with Elsevier, will provide an introduction to scholarly publishing. It will cover how to prepare a manuscript for submission, how to choose the right journal, and how the peer-review process works. By the end of this session you will:

    • Know how to write a good manuscript for publication
    • Be able to find a good journal based on your research topic
    • Understand how the peer review process works, and therefore increase the chances of being accepted by journals.

    How to apply for grants at Essex - University administrative support 12.00 – 13.00 EBS 2.41
    This introductory course provides an insight into the process of applying for research funding. How do I go about it? Which funding scheme should I concentrate on first? What support is available at the University of Essex? What is the process of applying once I have decided which scheme I am aiming for? Who can help me throughout the different stages?

    Grant writing essentials 13.00 - 14.00 EBS 2.40
    In this hands-on introductory course we will explore the essentials of grant writing. What makes a well written application? Working with ‘real life’ grant examples we will identify basic principals of constructing a well written grant application and will discuss 5 things to do and 5 things not to do when writing grants.

    Reference Management Software 13.00 -14.00 EBS 2.68
    Reference management software helps you to create and manage your lists of references for research projects, and it can potentially save you a lot of time! This session will introduce you to some of the available tools – including Zotero, Mendeley and Endnote Online – and give you the opportunity to try at least one of them for yourself. By the end of the session, you will:

    • Understand how reference management software can help you to save time and be more consistent with your referencing
    • Be aware of the different software packages available, so that you can select the most appropriate one for your needs
    • Be able to store references using Zotero, Mendeley or Endnote Online and insert them into a Word document

  • Friday 12 January

    University Ethical Review Processes12 – 1pm EBS 2.65
    This course provides guidance and support to help researchers to identify whether their research will require an ethics review and, if so, which would be the appropriate ethics review body. In addition, it will provide guidance and support in relation to University’s ethics review processes and to completing the University’s application for ethical approval form. You will be provided with information about the common mistakes made and how to avoid them. This in turn will help the process to run more smoothly so that you receive a more speedy decision.

    Data management basics 12.00 – 13.00 EBS 2.41
    How should I organise my data? How do I effectively document my research data? What formats should I use for depositing sharable data with an Archive? This session will explore these questions and more! Each session will include a 20 minute presentation, followed by 40 minutes of practical exercises, demonstrations, discussions and Q&As. Please ensure you bring your laptop to get hands-on experience with our tools and resources. Coffee, tea and biscuits will be provided.

    NIHR RDS supporting applications 12.00 – 13.00 EBS 2.46
    This training session is aimed at early-career researchers and will introduce them to the support available from the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Research Design Service (RDS) for the East of England. The will cover an explanation of what the RDS is and how it offers support to researchers applying for NIHR and other peer-reviewed funding. We will give an overview of NIHR funding opportunities and identify key elements of a successful application. By the end of this training session the participants will:

    • Understand the role and remit of the RDS and know how to access this support
    • Have an idea of the range and scope of NIHR funding programmes
    • Realise the importance of public involvement and how to include this in grant applications
    • Understand the key elements of a successful application
    • Obtain some tips about how to write a good application

    How to write a data management plan 13.00 - 14.00 EBS 2.40
    How do I write a data management plan (DMP)? What should I include? Is there a tool I can use? How do I cost for data management in a DMP? These questions, and many more, will be answered as this session works through practical DMP examples so you get hands on experience. Each session will include a 20 minute presentation, followed by 40 minutes of practical exercises, demonstrations, discussions and Q&As. Please ensure you bring your laptop to get hands-on experience with our tools and resources. Coffee, tea and biscuits will be provided.

    Developing your online research profile 13.00 - 14.00 EBS 2.68
    Your online profile is a valuable tool in showcasing your research, managing your publications list, finding potential collaborators and tracking citation counts. This session will introduce you to some of the research profile tools available to you – including Scopus, ResearcherID and Google Scholar – and look at how these tools can be linked to ORCID and the University’s research information system. By the end of the session you will:

    • Understand the benefits of having an online research profile
    • Be aware of the different research profile tools available to you
    • Be able to set up your own research profile(s)
    • Know how to link your profile(s) to ORCID / Essex RIS

Find out more

If you are an early career researcher we want to hear about the challenges you face and what you need in terms of future workshops. Please also contact us if you have any question in relation to NEwComERs or the training programme newcomers@essex.ac.uk