Childhood Studies (Including Foundation Year)

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Course overview
(BA) Bachelor of Arts
Childhood Studies (Including Foundation Year)
Inactive
University of Essex
University of Essex
Essex Pathways
Colchester Campus
Honours Degree
Full-time
Early Childhood Studies
BA L523JS
27/02/2018

Professional accreditation

None

Admission criteria

A-levels: DDD, or equivalent in UCAS tariff points, to include 2 full A-levels.

A satisfactory enhanced DBS check (including child and adult barred list check) will be required prior to starting any placement(s) for this course, which will commence in Year 1. This will be organised by the University. A satisfactory Overseas Criminal Record/Local Police Certificate is also required, in addition to a DBS Check, where you lived outside of the UK in the last 5 years for 6 months or more.

IELTS (International English Language Testing System) code

English language requirements for applicants whose first language is not English: IELTS 5.5 overall. Specified component grades are also required for applicants who require a Tier 4 visa to study in the UK.

Other English language qualifications may be acceptable so please contact us for further details. If we accept the English component of an international qualification then it will be included in the information given about the academic levels required. Please note that date restrictions may apply to some English language qualifications

If you are an international student requiring a Tier 4 visa to study in the UK please see our immigration webpages for the latest Home Office guidance on English language qualifications.

If you do not meet our IELTS requirements then you may be able to complete a pre-sessional English pathway that enables you to start your course without retaking IELTS.

Additional Notes

Our Year 0 courses are only open to UK and EU applicants. If you’re an international student, but do not meet the English language or academic requirements for direct admission to your chosen degree, you could prepare and gain entry through a pathway course. Find out more about opportunities available to you at the University of Essex International College.

Course qualifiers

None

Rules of assessment

Rules of assessment are the rules, principles and frameworks which the University uses to calculate your course progression and final results.

Additional notes

None

External examiners

Dr Claudia Lapping

Reader

UCL

External Examiners provide an independent overview of our courses, offering their expertise and help towards our continual improvement of course content, teaching, learning, and assessment. External Examiners are normally academics from other higher education institutions, but may be from the industry, business or the profession as appropriate for the course. They comment on how well courses align with national standards, and on how well the teaching, learning and assessment methods allow students to develop and demonstrate the relevant knowledge and skills needed to achieve their awards. External Examiners who are responsible for awards are key members of Boards of Examiners. These boards make decisions about student progression within their course and about whether students can receive their final award.

Key

Core You must take this module.
You must pass this module. No failure can be permitted.
Core with Options You can choose which module to study.
You must pass this module. No failure can be permitted.
Compulsory You must take this module.
There may be limited opportunities to continue on the course/be eligible for the degree if you fail.
Compulsory with Options You can choose which module to study.
There may be limited opportunities to continue on the course/be eligible for the degree if you fail.
Optional You can choose which module to study.
There may be limited opportunities to continue on the course/be eligible for the degree if you fail.

Exit awards

A module is given one of the following statuses: 'core' – meaning it must be taken and passed; 'compulsory' – meaning it must be taken; or 'optional' – meaning that students can choose the module from a designated list. The rules of assessment may allow for limited condonement of fails in 'compulsory' or 'optional' modules, but 'core' modules cannot be failed. The status of the module may be different in any exit awards which are available for the course. Exam Boards will consider students' eligibility for an exit award if they fail the main award or do not complete their studies.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide students with an understanding of childhood in both familial and social contexts. From conception to the early years of infancy (0 – 5yrs), through latency (6 – 10 yrs), and into the early and middle years of adolescence (11 – 18yrs), childhood will be seen in an ecological context. Childhood is understood to encompass both geographical space, where childhood differs according to societal and cultural contexts, practices and customs, and the contexts of family and community, including services which support these. Focusing on the development of the child and the implications for practice, we will situate children as active participants in their own lives and in the practices of families, societies and cultures.

After an introduction to the multiple perspectives and subject areas – such as history, psychology, education, health, sociology, welfare and social policy, cultural studies, law, political and economic perspectives – we will critically examine the contested and changing nature of the concept of childhood through number of key topics. We will examine the social history of childhood, children as seen in literature, the criminological approaches and debates which involve children, and the impact of economic and other stress and risk factors within their environment. In addition, we will evaluate and develop appropriate pedagogical approaches to work with children, their families and communities. How can we understand issues such as trauma, ADHD and autism, and how do we work therapeutically with children in groups, for example in day nursery or school?
To address these issues the programme offers a distinctive psychodynamic approach. We equip students with a conceptual framework to understand the complex factors that affect mental and emotional health, and consider the underlying meaning of behaviour and social conduct. Students will develop the key skills of psychodynamic observation, assessment and reflective practice, including how to make the right therapeutic interventions when most needed. By developing these skills whilst on placement, and regularly linking theory to practice in seminars, students will become ready to take up positions in a range of childcare and children’s services.

More particularly, this programme aims:

• To provide a range of conceptual frameworks and perspectives associated with the study of childhood
• To develop the analytic study skills needed to critically evaluate perspectives and issues concerning childhood
• To provide knowledge and understanding of child development from 0 – 18 years
• To develop skills in relation to observation of babies and children in a naturalistic context
• To develop a deep understanding of communication and building relationships with children
• To understand the processes involved in teaching and learning, including the role of emotion, play and social development
• To understand and critically examine issues around trauma, ADHD and Autism
• To understand and critically examine issues of childhood wellbeing, health and resilience
• To provide an understanding of the legislative frameworks surrounding children
• To provide a solid psychoanalytic vocabulary and understanding including the unconscious dimensions of human experience, relationships, communication and culture
• To provide a space and process by which students can explore and reflect upon the intersection of their academic, personal and professional selves
• To provide students with opportunities to undertake periods of supported work with children in placement



Learning outcomes and learning, teaching and assessment methods

On successful completion of the programme a graduate should demonstrate knowledge and skills as follows:

A: Knowledge and understanding

A1 Systematic knowledge of how babies, infants and children are understood nationally and globally
A2 Knowledge and understanding of infant and child development from a range of perspectives
A3 Recognise the distinct ways children have been understood in history and through literature
A4 To recognise the contributing factors to health, welling and resilience
A5 Knowledge of developmental trauma, autism, ADHD and appropriate interventions
A6 Psychodynamic understanding of the factors and processes involved in teaching and learning, including the role of emotion, play and social development
A7 Knowledge of psychoanalytic concepts, vocabulary and the key theoretical positions in the psychoanalysis of children
Learning Methods: The programme makes use of theoretical processes involved and discussion seminars (A1, A2, A3, A4, A5, A6 and A7), the experience placement-based learning, observation seminars and reflective groups (A2, A6) and field trips (A3). A1 can be further acquired through a placement year at a host organisation and through the year abroad. The experience of psychodynamic observation (A7) reflective groups and (A2, A4, A6).
Assessment Methods: Essays, exams, presentation, reflective report, observation record and observation reports.
Assessment of the placement experience is through a number of elements including an assessment of the students' performance in securing the placement, undertaking the placement and reflecting on the placement.

B: Intellectual and cognitive skills

B1 Develop the fundamental analytic study skills needed to critically evaluate perspectives and issues concerning childhood
B2 To define and use specific psychoanalytic concepts describing relationships and communication, including transference, counter-transference, projection, introjection, etc
B3 Capacity for intellectual enquiry, to access, retrieve and integrate information from multiple sources, to describe, evaluate and utilise different kinds of evidence
B4 Capacity to assess and integrate both human and intellectual material in making a formulation
B5 Capacity to evaluate live situations, to use one's own initiative, decision making
B6 Ability to reflective upon one's own experience, perceptions and socio-economic position in evaluating working practice
Learning Methods: The programme makes use of theoretical lectures and discussion seminars (B1, B2, B3, B6), the experience placement-based learning and observation seminars (B2, B4, B5, B6), B1 and B5 can be further acquired through a placement year at a host organisation and through the year abroad. The experience of psychodynamic observation (B4) reflective groups and (B5, B6).
Assessment Methods: Essays, exams, presentation, case study, reflective report, observation record and observation reports. Assessment of the placement experience is through a number of elements including an assessment of the students' performance in securing the placement, undertaking the placement and reflecting on the placement.

C: Practical skills

C1 Capacity for psychodynamic observation to analyse children's difficulties in communication and behaviour including relational and institutional factors
C2 Capacity to communicate effectively with children and to develop a potentially therapeutic relationship, capacity to work collaboratively with colleagues
C3 Sensitivity and attunement to the diverse modes of communication and behaviour of children, including their underlying meaning
C4 Capacity to learn from experience in different contexts - in placement, on field trips, in observation seminars, and reflective groups
C5 To carry out a piece of sustained work focussed on one child with their ecological context
C6 Capacity for use of self in reflective approach to practice.
C7 Capacity follow and operationalise guidance, regulation and legislative frameworks for children
C8 To produce, plan, carry out learning activities suitable for work with children in groups
Learning Methods: The programme makes use of theoretical lectures and discussion seminars (C1, C2, C3, C4), observation seminars (C2, C3, C4, C5), and reflective groups (C4, C6). C4, C6 and C7 are developed during placement, and on placement years and year abroad. C8 utilises lectures and experiential groups activities.
Assessment Methods: Essays, exams, presentation, case study, reflective report, quiz, field trip report, observation record and observation reports. Assessment of the placement experience is through a number of elements including an assessment of the students' performance in securing the placement, undertaking the placement and reflecting on the placement

D: Key skills

D1 To listen and communicate effectively with colleagues and with children, to communicate ideas effectively in written, oral and visual form, to debate, persuade, challenge or support.
D2 To produce formatted and well edited essays in word, use e-mail, Moodle and electronic submission of assessed work.
D3 To develop a capacity to make a formulation based on psychodynamic understanding of a child, and consider a range of therapeutic interventions, to assess available learning material and decide on specific topics for assignments, including a dissertation.
D4 To work collaboratively in seminars, observation seminars and reflective groups, and to incorporate the ideas and views of peers in developing perspectives, to engage professionally with colleagues and sensitively with children on placement.
D5 To work independently, including through library and e-based learning, to engage in independent research towards a dissertation.
D6 To learn through self-reflection on one's own responses to situations in seminars and on placement in practice, and to change one's behaviour as a result
Learning Methods: The programme makes use of theoretical lectures and discussion seminars (D1, D3, D5, D6), the experience of observation seminars and reflective groups (D2, D4). Students also make presentations linked to an individual research project (D1, D2, D4, D6). Finally, students utilise information technology by using email, electronic submission of assessed work, library e-resources including use of moodle as a learning repository (D1, D5, D6). These skills are taught specifically in Yr 1 and 3.
Assessment Methods: Essays, exams, presentation, case study, reflective report, quiz, field trip report, observation record and observation reports. Assessment of the placement experience is through a number of elements including an assessment of the students' performance in securing the placement, undertaking the placement and reflecting on the placement


Note

The University makes every effort to ensure that this information on its programme specification is accurate and up-to-date. Exceptionally it can be necessary to make changes, for example to courses, facilities or fees. Examples of such reasons might include a change of law or regulatory requirements, industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key personnel, change in government policy, or withdrawal/reduction of funding. Changes to courses may for example consist of variations to the content and method of delivery of programmes, courses and other services, to discontinue programmes, courses and other services and to merge or combine programmes or courses. The University will endeavour to keep such changes to a minimum, and will also keep students informed appropriately by updating our programme specifications.

The full Procedures, Rules and Regulations of the University governing how it operates are set out in the Charter, Statutes and Ordinances and in the University Regulations, Policy and Procedures.

Should you have any questions about programme specifications, please contact Course Records, Quality and Academic Development; email: crt@essex.ac.uk.