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Art History and History (Including Foundation Year and Year Abroad)

Course overview

(BA) Bachelor of Arts
Art History and History (Including Foundation Year and Year Abroad)
Current
University of Essex
University of Essex
Essex Pathways
Colchester Campus
Honours Degree
Full-time
History of Art, Architecture and Design
History
BA VV3B
http://www.essex.ac.uk/students/exams-and-coursework/ppg/ug/default.aspx
15/04/2017

UK and EU applicants should have, or expect to have:

72 UCAS tariff points from at least two full A-levels, or equivalent.

Examples of the above tariff may include:

  • A-levels: DDD
  • BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma: MMP

Essex Pathways Department accepts a wide range of qualifications from applicants. If you are unsure whether you meet the entry criteria, please get in touch for advice.

Essex Pathways Department is unable to accept applications from international students. Foundation pathways for international students are available at the University of Essex International College and are delivered and awarded by Kaplan, in partnership with the University of Essex. Successful completion will enable you to progress to the relevant degree course at the University of Essex.

English language requirements for applicants whose first language is not English: IELTS 5.5 overall. Specified component grades are also required for applicants who require a Tier 4 visa to study in the UK.

Other English language qualifications may be acceptable so please contact us for further details. If we accept the English component of an international qualification then it will be included in the information given about the academic levels required. Please note that date restrictions may apply to some English language qualifications

If you are an international student requiring a Tier 4 visa to study in the UK please see our immigration webpages for the latest Home Office guidance on English language qualifications.

If you do not meet our IELTS requirements then you may be able to complete a pre-sessional English pathway that enables you to start your course without retaking IELTS.

Additional Notes

Our Year 0 courses are only open to UK and EU applicants. If you’re an international student, but do not meet the English language or academic requirements for direct admission to your chosen degree, you could prepare and gain entry through a pathway course. Find out more about opportunities available to you at the University of Essex International College.

External Examiners

Prof Richard Simon Clay
Newcastle University
Professor of Digital Cultures

External Examiners provide an independent overview of our courses, offering their expertise and help towards our continual improvement of course content, teaching, learning, and assessment. External Examiners are normally academics from other higher education institutions, but may be from the industry, business or the profession as appropriate for the course. They comment on how well courses align with national standards, and on how well the teaching, learning and assessment methods allow students to develop and demonstrate the relevant knowledge and skills needed to achieve their awards. External Examiners who are responsible for awards are key members of Boards of Examiners. These boards make decisions about student progression within their course and about whether students can receive their final award.

eNROL, the module enrolment system, is now open until Monday 21 October 2019 8:59AM, for students wishing to make changes to their module options.

Key

Core You must take this module You must pass this module. No failure can be permitted.
Core with Options You can choose which module to study
Compulsory You must take this module There may be limited opportunities to continue on the course/be eligible for the degree if you fail.
Compulsory with Options You can choose which module to study
Optional You can choose which module to study

Year 1 - 2020/21

Component Number Module Code Module Title Status Credits
01 AR113-4-SP Art and Ideas: I(A) Core 15
02 AR119-4-AU Art and Ideas: I(B) Core 15
03 CS711-4-FY Skills for University Studies Compulsory 0
04 HR100-4-FY or HR111-4-FY Core with Options 30
05 Recommend AR116-4-AU and/or Art History Option(s) Optional 30
06 CS101-4-FY or option(s) from list or Outside Option(s) Optional 30

Year 2 - 2021/22

Component Number Module Code Module Title Status Credits
01 HR211-5-AU HR211-5-FY Core 15
02 AR220-5-SP Art and Ideas II: More Art, More Ideas - Critique and Historiography in the History of Art Compulsory 15
03 Art History option(s) Optional 30
04 History or Art History option(s) Optional 30
05 HR231-5-SP or History option Optional 15
06 AR250-5-FY or (CS712-5-FY and Art History option) Compulsory with Options 15
07 AR701-5-SP Capstone Preparation Module Compulsory 0

Year Abroad/Placement - 2022/23

Component Number Module Code Module Title Status Credits
01 AW600-6-FY Compulsory 60

Year 3 - 2023/24

Component Number Module Code Module Title Status Credits
01 Art History option(s) Optional 30
02 History option(s) Optional 30
03 Art History or History option(s) Optional 30
04 Art History or History option Optional 15
05 AR383-6-AU or AR383-6-SP or AR347-6-AU or AR347-6-SP Compulsory with Options 15

Exit awards

A module is given one of the following statuses: 'core' – meaning it must be taken and passed; 'compulsory' – meaning it must be taken; or 'optional' – meaning that students can choose the module from a designated list. The rules of assessment may allow for limited condonement of fails in 'compulsory' or 'optional' modules, but 'core' modules cannot be failed. The status of the module may be different in any exit awards which are available for the course. Exam Boards will consider students' eligibility for an exit award if they fail the main award or do not complete their studies.

Programme aims

To offer a varied, flexible and distinctive curriculum across the field of art history and history.

To provide the opportunity for an understanding of both artistic and historical events within a political, social, economic and cultural context.

To enable students to understand the relationship between the past and the present and to enable consideration of the ways in which this is documented visually.

To encourage both critical engagement with and enjoyment of the visual arts, particularly through first-hand observation.

To develop skills of research analysis and argument which bring the disciplines of history and art history together and to enable students to understand and to appreciate the relationship between them with a degree of critical awareness.

To enable students to undertake independent study in a dissertation on a topic of their choice.

To provide the knowledge and skills (critical inquiry and argument, imaginative understanding, written, spoken and visual interpretation, communication and presentation) that will not only stand students in good stead for more specialised academic careers, but will also enhance their opportunities for employment in a wide range of other careers.

The outcomes listed below represent the minimum that might be expected of a graduate of the School of Philosophy and Art History and the Department of History of the University of Essex. It is the intention of the School/Department that the vast majority of graduates will achieve significantly more.

Learning outcomes and learning, teaching and assessment methods

On successful completion of the programme a graduate should demonstrate knowledge and skills as follows:

A: Knowledge and understanding

A1 knowledge and understanding of History and History of Art from C14th - C21st (based on a choice of module options from each discipline
A2 knowledge and understanding of the ways in which the visual is related to the broader historical and cultural context and vice versa
A3 knowledge and understanding of description, comparative analysis and interpretation of primary and secondary source material
A4 knowledge and understanding of some of the debates, concepts and values which inform study and practice within the fields of history and art history
A5 knowledge and understanding of the ways in which the disciplines of history and art history can be inter-related and considered with relevance to one another and in order to enable the study of one through the other (and by means of the other) and vice versa
A6 Knowledge of some of the concepts, values and debates that inform study and practice in the field.
Learning Methods: The degree is based on progression from introductory topics in the first year to a more specialised set of modules in the second and third years. Knowledge and understanding are developed via lectures, classes, coursework and examination. Individual and group presentation work develops A2-A5 in particular.
Regular, detailed feedback from tutors, both oral and written, enables continued and measured progression.

Regular museum, gallery and exhibition visits enable the development of knowledge and understanding within a geographical and historical framework and similarly covers A1-A6.

Study visits both within the UK and abroad during the second and the third year enable understanding as above and A1 specifically.

Assessment Methods: Assessment is continual throughout each academic year and takes the form of written essays, literature reviews, take-home research papers, in-class slide tests, summaries of weekly readings, and unseen written examinations, including questions on visual material in photographic form.

Similarly, more informal but regular contact with tutors, both in classroom discussion and tutorial sessions, enables continued reflection and improvement throughout the entire module.

B: Intellectual and cognitive skills

B1 to synthesise and analyse primary and secondary material and to identify significant elements and key issues within them
B2 to formulate and answer questions relating to history and/or art history
B3 to identify key issues which align art and histories, be they biographical, religious, social, political, economic and/or literary
B4 to consider and solve problems using knowledge and experience
B5 to consider the ways in which histories have impacted upon art and visual culture and vice versa
Learning Methods: Intellectual and cognitive skills are introduced through background reading, class reading, in class discussion and by visual analysis of works of art in order to cover B1-B6.

Similarly all skills B1-B6 are developed with feedback from tutors and in peer groups

Assessment Methods: Assessment is continual throughout each academic year and takes the form of written essays, literature reviews, take-home research papers, in-class slide tests, summaries of weekly readings, and unseen written examinations, including questions on visual material in photographic form.

Similarly, more informal but regular contact with tutors, both in classroom discussion and tutorial sessions, enables continued reflection and improvement throughout the entire module.

C: Practical skills

C1 to read and evaluate primary and secondary source material critically
C2 to assess, describe, analyse and interpret works of art visually
C3 to work effectively as part of a team or independently
C4 to write coherently and concisely within the boundaries of conventional academic scholarship
C5 to understand and compile relevant bibliographical material
Learning Methods: Preparation for and participation in seminar discussion develops C1-C6.

The final year dissertation (capstone project), compulsory for the course, enables students to focus on all areas but especially C1 and C5 and as such introduces students to the demands of independent research which is a key indicator to the demands of, as well as any potential inclination towards postgraduate study.

Assessment Methods: Assessment is continual throughout each academic year and takes the form of written essays, literature reviews, take-home research papers, in-class slide tests, summaries of weekly readings, and unseen written examinations, including questions on visual material in photographic form.

Similarly, more informal but regular contact with tutors, both in classroom discussion and tutorial sessions, enables continued reflection and improvement throughout the entire course.

C1 and C5 are assessed by analysis of documents and bibliographical materials.
C1, C2, C3 are assessed as part of group work in particular.
C1, C2, C4 and C5 are assessed by coursework in particular.

Presentation work and examinations test the skills of working under pressure without notes and cover C1-C5

D: Key skills

D1 effective communication of concepts and arguments in a range of contexts using a range of different resources; special ability to deploy visual material in a variety of media in the context of presentations or written work
D2 appropriate use of IT for research and for presentation work
D3 ability to: analyse and explain materials and data;. To manage projects;. To apply knowledge in a way appropriate for judgement; and to offer ideas and solutions as pertinent to various contexts
D4 ability to accept and to reflect upon feedback, and. tTo work independently and effectively to deadlines
Learning Methods: Participation in seminar discussion, group project work and essay writing develops D1, D4 and D6 in particular.

Information technology (D2) is implicit to the module: in the form of visual media as visual media via (including the use of PowerPoint and visual imagery, as well as DVD). ,These visual media serve towhich is intended to inform students while developing their critical awareness of and to develop their critical awareness of itinformation technologies.

Students are made aware of the Key Skills On-Line resources by means of the departmental handbooks and are expected demonstrate their IT skills during their group presentation.

Assessment Methods: Assessment methods Assessment is continual throughout each academic year and takes a formal line: Coursework essays.
Group and individual presentations.
Literature reviews.
Virtual Exhibitions.
Examination.
Similarly, more informal but regular contact with tutors, both in classroom discussion and tutorial sessions enables continued reflection and improvement throughout the entire module.


Note

The University makes every effort to ensure that this information on its programme specification is accurate and up-to-date. Exceptionally it can be necessary to make changes, for example to courses, facilities or fees. Examples of such reasons might include a change of law or regulatory requirements, industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key personnel, change in government policy, or withdrawal/reduction of funding. Changes to courses may for example consist of variations to the content and method of delivery of programmes, courses and other services, to discontinue programmes, courses and other services and to merge or combine programmes or courses. The University will endeavour to keep such changes to a minimum, and will also keep students informed appropriately by updating our programme specifications.

The full Procedures, Rules and Regulations of the University governing how it operates are set out in the Charter, Statutes and Ordinances and in the University Regulations, Policy and Procedures.

Should you have any questions about programme specifications, please contact Course Records, Quality and Academic Development; email: crt@essex.ac.uk.