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Curatorial Studies (Including Year Abroad)

Course overview

(BA) Bachelor of Arts
Curatorial Studies (Including Year Abroad)
Current
University of Essex
University of Essex
Art History and Theory
Colchester Campus
Honours Degree
Full-time
History of Art, Architecture and Design
BA V352
http://www.essex.ac.uk/students/exams-and-coursework/ppg/ug/default.aspx
15/04/2017

A-levels: BBB

IB: 30 points. We are also happy to consider a combination of separate IB Diploma Programmes at both Higher and Standard Level. Exact offer levels will vary depending on the range of subjects being taken at higher and standard level, and the course applied for. Please contact the Undergraduate Admissions Office for more information.

BTEC Extended Diploma: DDM (in relevant subject)

English language requirements for applicants whose first language is not English: IELTS 6.0 overall. Different requirements apply for second year entry, and specified component grades are also required for applicants who require a Tier 4 visa to study in the UK.

Other English language qualifications may be acceptable so please contact us for further details. If we accept the English component of an international qualification then it will be included in the information given about the academic levels listed above. Please note that date restrictions may apply to some English language qualifications

If you are an international student requiring a Tier 4 visa to study in the UK please see our immigration webpages for the latest Home Office guidance on English language qualifications.

If you do not meet our IELTS requirements then you may be able to complete a pre-sessional English pathway that enables you to start your course without retaking IELTS.

Additional Notes

If you’re an international student, but do not meet the English language or academic requirements for direct admission to this degree, you could prepare and gain entry through a pathway course. Find out more about opportunities available to you at the University of Essex International College here.

STUDY ABROAD YEAR 1. Students must comply with the rules and regulations of the partner university. 2. Study Abroad students are required to take a full module load, which is a minimum of 30 ECTS credits per semester in Europe, 12 US credits per semester or quarter term in the US, or equivalent elsewhere. The Essex Abroad Office will provide details. 3. Modules must normally be taken for a Grade, not on a Pass/Fail basis. 4. Modules should normally be taken at the appropriate study level. Detailed guidance will be provided by the designated School representative. 5. All Study Abroad module choices must be approved in advance by the designated School representative. 6. On a four-year degree, the Study Abroad Year will be weighted as 60 Essex credits for degree classification purposes, but all modules taken abroad will be used in calculating the converted marks

External Examiners

Prof Richard Simon Clay
Newcastle University
Professor of Digital Cultures

External Examiners provide an independent overview of our courses, offering their expertise and help towards our continual improvement of course content, teaching, learning, and assessment. External Examiners are normally academics from other higher education institutions, but may be from the industry, business or the profession as appropriate for the course. They comment on how well courses align with national standards, and on how well the teaching, learning and assessment methods allow students to develop and demonstrate the relevant knowledge and skills needed to achieve their awards. External Examiners who are responsible for awards are key members of Boards of Examiners. These boards make decisions about student progression within their course and about whether students can receive their final award.

eNROL, the module enrolment system, is now open until Monday 21 October 2019 8:59AM, for students wishing to make changes to their module options.

Key

Core You must take this module You must pass this module. No failure can be permitted.
Core with Options You can choose which module to study
Compulsory You must take this module There may be limited opportunities to continue on the course/be eligible for the degree if you fail.
Compulsory with Options You can choose which module to study
Optional You can choose which module to study

Year 1 - 2019/20

Component Number Module Code Module Title Status Credits
01 CS711-4-FY Skills for University Studies Compulsory 0
02 AR113-4-AU Art and Ideas: I(A) Core 15
03 AR115-4-SP Art, Sex and Death Compulsory 15
04 AR119-4-SP Art and Ideas: I(B) Core 15
05 AR121-4-SP Art Revolutions Compulsory 15
06 Art History option or outside option(s) Optional 30
07 Art History option or outside option(s) Optional 30

Year Abroad/Placement - 2021/22

Component Number Module Code Module Title Status Credits
01 AW600-6-FY Compulsory 60

Year 3 - 2022/23

Component Number Module Code Module Title Status Credits
01 AR346-6-AU Inventing the Future: Early Contemporary 1945-1980 Compulsory 15
02 Capstone: AR347-6-AU or AR347-6-SP Compulsory with Options 15
03 AR322-6-AU The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Reproduction: Film, New Media, Software and the Internet Compulsory 15
04 AR312-6-SP Contemporary Art: 1980 to the Present Compulsory 15
05 AR343-6-SP Art, the Law and the Market Compulsory 15
06 Art History option(s) Optional 30
07 Art History option Optional 15

Exit awards

A module is given one of the following statuses: 'core' – meaning it must be taken and passed; 'compulsory' – meaning it must be taken; or 'optional' – meaning that students can choose the module from a designated list. The rules of assessment may allow for limited condonement of fails in 'compulsory' or 'optional' modules, but 'core' modules cannot be failed. The status of the module may be different in any exit awards which are available for the course. Exam Boards will consider students' eligibility for an exit award if they fail the main award or do not complete their studies.

Programme aims

To offer a foundation to students interested in becoming exhibition curators or working in other areas of gallery management, such as museum education or conservation.

To provide the opportunity for an in-depth understanding of major developments and ideas associated with the interrelated fields of exhibition design and art history.

To introduce students to a variety of interpretative methods and forms of questioning, particularly those appropriate to studying the display of artworks and other visual artefacts. Some of these include: theories about the social and political implications of exhibition design, architecture, and visual representation; approaches to analyzing the value and function of visual artworks and the environments in which such appear; and critical approaches to examining the conditions of the production, circulation, and reception of visual artefacts.

To develop students' capacities for independent thought and critical reflection.

To encourage both an appreciation of and critical engagement with the visual arts and exhibition display, particularly through first-hand observation.

To equip students with the basic skills necessary to work as a curator or in related fields of gallery management.

To provide the knowledge and skills—such as critical inquiry and argument, imaginative understanding, written, spoken and visual interpretation, communication and presentation—that will not only prepare students for particular careers but will also enhance their opportunities for employment in a wide range of other careers.

The outcomes listed below represent the minimum that might be expected of a graduate of the School of Philosophy and Art History of the University of Essex. It is the intention of the School that the vast majority of graduates will achieve significantly more.

To provide students with opportunities to experience a different system of HE through a broad range of modules on the Year Abroad. To develop students' intercultural skills necessary for living and studying in a different culture.

Learning outcomes and learning, teaching and assessment methods

On successful completion of the programme a graduate should demonstrate knowledge and skills as follows:

A: Knowledge and understanding

A1 Develop a basic understanding of major developments and ideas associated with the field of exhibition design and art history more broadly.
A2 Acquire in-depth knowledge about key figures, formal developments, and other issues that have transformed the interrelated fields of exhibition design and art history.
A3 A knowledge of contemporary developments in exhibition design and art production, as well as of current research methodologies for historicising broader developments in exhibition design and art.
A4 Knowledge of major issues currently debated by critics, artists, historians and curators about the display of art and other forms of visual culture, and an understanding of how these debates will likely transform the fields of exhibition design and art history.
A5 An experience-based understanding of work roles.
Learning Methods: A1-A4 are acquired through: teaching in lecture and class format; lecturers conveying module content in a general manner while allowing for, and encouraging, questions from students. These skills are developed further on compulsory gallery visits in all three years and through seminar discussions and presentations with oral feedback from tutors. Throughout, students are expected to extend and enhance the knowledge and understanding they acquire from classes and lectures by regularly consulting secondary scholarship related to the course. This independent research is then consolidated in essay work, and through feedback in written form.

A5 is acquired through an employability module; a further module in the second year that offers students hands-on experience in installing artworks; and an independent curatorial project completed by each student pursuing this degree.

Assessment Methods: Assessment of students' knowledge and understanding takes place through a variety of assessment instruments including coursework essays, group presentations, individual presentations, virtual exhibitions, viva voce and unseen written examinations, including questions on visual material in photographic form.

B: Intellectual and cognitive skills

B1 Ability to analyse a given body of material, breaking it down into component points or parts and highlighting the most significant among them, and to present one's own evaluation of it.
B2 Ability to use and criticise specialised terminology used in the fields of exhibition design and art history
B3 Ability to summarise complex and demanding texts, often written at historical distance, and to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the views they propose.
B4 Ability to identify and critically evaluate underlying issues in textual materials and visual materials (misassumptions in texts; implicit biases revealed through photographs of museum installations).
B5 Respond to unfamiliar artefacts, issues or ideas with an open mind
B6 Solve problems using knowledge and experience.
B7 A capacity to connect subject-specific theory to practice in a work environment.
Learning Methods: Intellectual and cognitive skills are initiated through lectures, where students are expected to develop skills, and further developed in seminars. The seminar work encourages critical discussion arising from the analysis and interpretation of visual artefacts or texts, with an emphasis on being able to reason cogently, argue coherently and present one's own viewpoint persuasively. Students translate the skills acquired there collectively into individually assessed essays. In turn, the essays prepare students for examinations and more extended forms of writing, as well as independent and group-based projects, where they gain experience in different curatorial tasks and critically explore the interrelationship between the history of art and exhibition design, as fields of scholarly inquiry, and curatorial practice. As the summative assessment for any given module, the exam or its equivalent tests the students’ ability both to demonstrate and to sustain the same skills in controlled conditions.
Assessment Methods: Outcomes are assessed through continuous coursework; unseen written examinations, including questions on visual material in photographic form; and independent and group-based projects, which involve producing written work and supplementary visual materials (e.g., gallery floor plans). Coursework consists of essays written during the academic year for a specified module, returned with a grade and written feedback for the student. Examinations consist of essay-based questions, for which revision classes are provided. Capstone projects, which involve curating an online exhibition, will be assessed on two levels: first, through (oral and written) formative feedback as students complete key milestones involved in developing their projects; second, through a written summative feedback for the final project.

C: Practical skills

C101 Ability to apply the necessary organisational and cultural skills for living and working abroad.
Learning Methods: Skills C1 and C4 are introduced in lectures and developed through classes and through seminars. Gallery visits form a crucial element in the development of C4, through dialogue among students and with staff in front of particular artefacts and gallery displays, often after preparation in class. Guidance on C1-C4 is given in teaching, in supervision of essays, and to a limited extent in the Student Handbook. The strategy ensures that, having acquired a basic command of the range of skills, students exercise these skills in the more specialised modules.
C5 is acquired through the guided but relatively independent process of organizing and successfully completing a period of living and studying abroad.
Assessment Methods: Outcomes are assessed through continuous coursework; unseen written examinations, including questions on visual material in photographic form; and independent and group-based projects, which involve producing written work and supplementary visual materials (e.g., gallery floor plans).
Coursework consists of essays written during the academic year for a specified module, returned with a grade and written feedback for the student. Examinations consist of essay-based questions, for which revision classes are provided. Capstone projects, which involve curating an online exhibition, will be assessed on two levels: first, through (oral and written) formative feedback as students complete key milestones involved in developing their projects; second, through a written summative feedback for the final project..

C5 is assessed throughout the Year Abroad.

D: Key skills

D1 The ability to communicate information, arguments and ideas cogently and effectively in a range of different contexts using a range of different aids or resources; special ability to deploy visual material in a variety of media in the context of presentations or written work
D2 Students should be able to make use of IT for research purposes (including searchable databases such as library catalogues and internet sources), to present assessed work, and be able to use email. Students should also be able to use the handful of computer programs (e.g., Word, SketchUp or similar applications) necessary to produce simple renderings and virtual walk-throughs of exhibition spaces.
D3 Ability to identify the problem to be solved; to articulate critically the assumptions underlying or connected with the problem; to compare and contrast differing and often contradictory solutions to the problem; and to provide argument and evidence in defense of one's solution to the problem.
D4 Students will be given the opportunity to work constructively and productively in groups, and be able to participate effectively in seminars.
D5 Ability to read closely and carefully; to organize one's reading and thinking in relation to specific topics; take responsibility for their own work; reflect on their own learning and performance and make constructive use of feedback from the lecturer in the form of written comments on coursework and oral communication; and to work to deadline
Learning Methods: Skills D1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 are acquired and developed through the teaching and learning methods described above and in class discussions. The five key skills are implicit throughout the degree. Communication is developed through seminar discussion, but also through attending lectures. Students are encouraged to use the various online packages, library and internet sources, and to make use of the courses provided by the University’s Skill Centre. While specific guidance on D2 will be offered during the supervision of students’ final projects, students are expected and encouraged to share responsibility for their own programme of studies.
Assessment Methods: Outcomes D1, 2, 4, 5 & 6 are assessed through continuous coursework and unseen written examinations. Coursework consists of essays written during the academic year for a specified module, returned with a grade and written feedback for the student. Examinations consist of essay-based questions, for which revision classes are provided. Capstone projects, which involve curating an online exhibition, will be assessed on two levels: first, through (oral and written) formative feedback as students complete key milestones involved in developing their projects; second, through a written summative feedback for the final project.


Note

The University makes every effort to ensure that this information on its programme specification is accurate and up-to-date. Exceptionally it can be necessary to make changes, for example to courses, facilities or fees. Examples of such reasons might include a change of law or regulatory requirements, industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key personnel, change in government policy, or withdrawal/reduction of funding. Changes to courses may for example consist of variations to the content and method of delivery of programmes, courses and other services, to discontinue programmes, courses and other services and to merge or combine programmes or courses. The University will endeavour to keep such changes to a minimum, and will also keep students informed appropriately by updating our programme specifications.

The full Procedures, Rules and Regulations of the University governing how it operates are set out in the Charter, Statutes and Ordinances and in the University Regulations, Policy and Procedures.

Should you have any questions about programme specifications, please contact Course Records, Quality and Academic Development; email: crt@essex.ac.uk.