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Computer Networks and Security

Course overview

(MSc) Master of Science
Computer Networks and Security
Current
University of Essex
University of Essex
Computer Science and Electronic Engineering (School of)
Colchester Campus
Accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) on behalf of the Engineering Council as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for registration as a Chartered Engineer. Candidates must hold a CEng accredited BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree to comply with full CEng registration requirements.
Masters
Full-time or part-time
None
MSC H60112
http://www.essex.ac.uk/students/exams-and-coursework/ppg/pgt/assess-rules.aspx
07/06/2018

A 2.2 in Computer Science; Computer Engineering; Computer Networks; Computer Games; Computing; Software Engineering, Electronic Engineering; Electrical Engineering; Telecommunication Engineering; Automation; Mechatronic Engineering; Mathematics or Physics.

Graduates of Computer Science; Computer Engineering; Computer Networks; Computer Games; Computing; Software Engineering must have studied :

ONE programming module (e.g. C, C#, C++, Java, Python, Object Oriented programming, Advanced Programming).

ONE maths module (e.g.Mathematics; Calculus; Algebra; Differential Equations).

and ONE other computing related module (e.g. Database, Web development, Software engineering, Operating system, Computer architecture; Computer systems etc.).

Graduates of Electronic Engineering; Electrical Engineering; Telecommunication Engineering; Automation; Mechatronic Engineering; Mathematics; Physics must have studied:

ONE programming module (e.g. C, C#, C++, Java, Python, Object Oriented programming, Advanced Programming).

ONE maths module (e.g.Mathematics; Calculus; Algebra; Differential Equations).

and ONE other math module (e.g. Mathematics, Calculus, Algebra, Differential Equations, Probability and statistics, Signals and systems, Control theory, Control systems, Computer systems, Embedded systems, Microprocessors).

IELTS 6.0 overall with a minimum component score of 5.5

If you do not meet our IELTS requirements then you may be able to complete a pre-sessional English pathway that enables you to start your course without retaking IELTS.

Additional Notes

The University uses academic selection criteria to determine an applicant’s ability to successfully complete a course at the University of Essex. Where appropriate, we may ask for specific information relating to previous modules studied or work experience.

External Examiners

Prof Raouf Hamzaoui
De Montfort University

External Examiners provide an independent overview of our courses, offering their expertise and help towards our continual improvement of course content, teaching, learning, and assessment. External Examiners are normally academics from other higher education institutions, but may be from the industry, business or the profession as appropriate for the course. They comment on how well courses align with national standards, and on how well the teaching, learning and assessment methods allow students to develop and demonstrate the relevant knowledge and skills needed to achieve their awards. External Examiners who are responsible for awards are key members of Boards of Examiners. These boards make decisions about student progression within their course and about whether students can receive their final award.

eNROL, the module enrolment system, is now open until Monday 21 October 2019 8:59AM, for students wishing to make changes to their module options.

Key

Core You must take this module You must pass this module. No failure can be permitted.
Core with Options You can choose which module to study
Compulsory You must take this module There may be limited opportunities to continue on the course/be eligible for the degree if you fail.
Compulsory with Options You can choose which module to study
Optional You can choose which module to study

Year 1 - 2019/20

Exit Award Status
Component Number Module Code Module Title Status Credits PG Diploma PG Certificate
01 CE901-7-SU MSc Project and Dissertation Core 60
02 CE823-7-SP Network Security Compulsory 15
03 CE705-7-AU Introduction to Programming in Python Compulsory 15
04 CE707-7-AU IP Networking and Applications Compulsory 15
05 CE708-7-AU Computer Security Compulsory 15
06 CE902-7-FY Professional Practice and Research Methodology Compulsory 15
07 Option from list Optional 30
08 Option from list Optional 15

Exit awards

A module is given one of the following statuses: 'core' – meaning it must be taken and passed; 'compulsory' – meaning it must be taken; or 'optional' – meaning that students can choose the module from a designated list. The rules of assessment may allow for limited condonement of fails in 'compulsory' or 'optional' modules, but 'core' modules cannot be failed. The status of the module may be different in any exit awards which are available for the course. Exam Boards will consider students' eligibility for an exit award if they fail the main award or do not complete their studies.

Programme aims

1. To provide postgraduate training in Computer Networks and Security and to produce engineers with an understanding of the principles and practice of computer networks and the services they support.

2. To prepare students for careers in advanced research and/or industry by extending their knowledge and skills in a specialised area of computer networks and security.

3. To enable students to contribute to future developments in their field by providing them with an understanding of recent advances and current research activity within the field of computer networks and security.

4. To develop students' ability to make a critical evaluation of the theories, techniques and systems used in their chosen area of specialisation.

5. To develop research and problem-solving techniques in their chosen area of specialisation.

6. To develop students' ability to undertake research through practical project experience.

Learning outcomes and learning, teaching and assessment methods

On successful completion of the programme a graduate should demonstrate knowledge and skills as follows:

A: Knowledge and understanding

A1 A comprehensive understanding of the relevant scientific principles of the specialisation.
A2 A critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights most of which is at, or informed by, the forefront of the specialisation.
A3 Knowledge and understanding of computer networks and computer security.
Learning Methods: Lectures are the principal method of delivery for the concepts and principles involved in the majority of the learning outcomes.

Students are also directed to reading from textbooks, academic papers and material available on-line.

Understanding is reinforced by means of exercise classes, discussion groups, laboratories, assignments and project work.

Specialist knowledge is further developed during supervision of the individual dissertation.

Assessment Methods: Achievement of knowledge outcomes is assessed primarily through unseen closed-book examinations, and also through marked coursework.

An assessment of the understanding of underlying concepts and principles forms part of the overall assessment of the individual dissertation report and oral presentation.

B: Intellectual and cognitive skills

B1 Understanding of concepts relevant to the discipline, some from outside engineering, and the ability to evaluate them critically and to apply them effectively, including in engineering projects.
B2 Ability both to apply appropriate engineering analysis methods for solving complex problems in engineering and to assess their limitations.
B3 Ability to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies.
B4 Knowledge, understanding and skills to work with information that may be incomplete or uncertain, quantify the effect of this on the design and, where appropriate, use theory or experimental research to mitigate deficiencies.
B5 Knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and the ability to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations.
B6 Apply secure engineering design principles to the design of computer systems and computer networks.
Learning Methods: The basis for intellectual skills is provided in lectures, and they are developed by means of recommended reading, guided and self directed study, assignments and project work.
Assessment Methods: Achievement of intellectual skills is assessed primarily through unseen closed-book examinations, and also through marked assignments and project work.

C: Practical skills

C1 Ability to collect and analyse research data and to use appropriate engineering analysis tools in tackling unfamiliar problems, such as those with uncertain or incomplete data or specifications, by the appropriate innovation, use or adaptation of engineering analytical methods.
C2 Advanced level knowledge and understanding of a wide range of engineering materials and components.
C3 A thorough understanding of current practice and its limitations, and some appreciation of likely new developments.
C4 Ability to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
C5 Ability to design, construct and analyse computer systems and computer networks.
Learning Methods: Practical skills are developed in exercise classes, laboratory classes, assignments and project work.
Assessment Methods: Achievement of practical skills is assessed through marked coursework, project reports, oral presentations and demonstrations of completed systems.

D: Key skills

D1 Ability to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes to fulfil new needs.
D2 Awareness of the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering.
D3 Awareness that engineers need to take account of the commercial and social contexts in which they operate.
D4 Knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, their limitations, and how these may be applied in the context of the particular specialisation.
D5 Awareness that engineering activities should promote sustainable development and ability to apply quantitative techniques where appropriate.
D6 Awareness of relevant regulatory requirements governing engineering activities in the context of the particular specialisation.
D7 Awareness of and ability to make general evaluations of risk issues in the context of the particular specialisation, including health and safety, environmental and commercial risk.
D8 Understanding of different roles within an engineering team and the ability to exercise initiative and personal responsibility, which may be as a team member or leader.
D9 Communicate their work to technical and non-technical audiences.
Learning Methods: Students learn key skills in research, problem solving, communication and team project work in projects, the Professional Practice and Research Methodology module and the individual dissertation.
Assessment Methods: Assessment of the key skills is intrinsic to subject based assessment.
The assessment of project work includes specific allocations of credit for project management and the quality of presentations.
An individual's contribution to team projects is determined by means of a submission containing reflective and self-assessment components.
The assessment of the dissertation report includes specific allocation of credit for the quality, extent and relevance of a bibliography, including internet sources.


Note

The University makes every effort to ensure that this information on its programme specification is accurate and up-to-date. Exceptionally it can be necessary to make changes, for example to courses, facilities or fees. Examples of such reasons might include a change of law or regulatory requirements, industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key personnel, change in government policy, or withdrawal/reduction of funding. Changes to courses may for example consist of variations to the content and method of delivery of programmes, courses and other services, to discontinue programmes, courses and other services and to merge or combine programmes or courses. The University will endeavour to keep such changes to a minimum, and will also keep students informed appropriately by updating our programme specifications.

The full Procedures, Rules and Regulations of the University governing how it operates are set out in the Charter, Statutes and Ordinances and in the University Regulations, Policy and Procedures.

Should you have any questions about programme specifications, please contact Course Records, Quality and Academic Development; email: crt@essex.ac.uk.