Jungian and Post-Jungian Studies

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Course overview
(MA) Master of Arts
Jungian and Post-Jungian Studies
Current
University of Essex
University of Essex
Psychosocial and Psychoanalytic Studies
Colchester Campus
Masters
Part-time
None
MA C89324
15/04/2017

Professional accreditation

None

Admission criteria

We will consider applications with an overall grade of 2:2 and above, and those with requisite experience in the field on a case-by-case basis. Please contact the course director, Dr Kevin Lu, at: klu@essex.ac.uk.

With your online application you must submit a personal statement; this should detail the reasons for wanting to study the course, including any relevant experience (work or voluntary) that may support your application.

IELTS (International English Language Testing System) code

IELTS 6.5 overall with a minimum component score of 5.5

If you do not meet our IELTS requirements then you may be able to complete a pre-sessional English pathway that enables you to start your course without retaking IELTS.

Additional Notes

The University uses academic selection criteria to determine an applicant’s ability to successfully complete a course at the University of Essex. Where appropriate, we may ask for specific information relating to previous modules studied or work experience.

Course qualifiers

None

Rules of assessment

Rules of assessment are the rules, principles and frameworks which the University uses to calculate your course progression and final results.

Additional notes

Please refer to the full time version of this course for information on Core and Compulsory modules.

External examiners

Dr Lucy Huskinson

Senior Lecturer / Head of School

Bangor University

External Examiners provide an independent overview of our courses, offering their expertise and help towards our continual improvement of course content, teaching, learning, and assessment. External Examiners are normally academics from other higher education institutions, but may be from the industry, business or the profession as appropriate for the course. They comment on how well courses align with national standards, and on how well the teaching, learning and assessment methods allow students to develop and demonstrate the relevant knowledge and skills needed to achieve their awards. External Examiners who are responsible for awards are key members of Boards of Examiners. These boards make decisions about student progression within their course and about whether students can receive their final award.

Key

Core You must take this module.
You must pass this module. No failure can be permitted.
Core with Options You can choose which module to study.
You must pass this module. No failure can be permitted.
Compulsory You must take this module.
There may be limited opportunities to continue on the course/be eligible for the degree if you fail.
Compulsory with Options You can choose which module to study.
There may be limited opportunities to continue on the course/be eligible for the degree if you fail.
Optional You can choose which module to study.
There may be limited opportunities to continue on the course/be eligible for the degree if you fail.

Year 1 - 2019/20

Exit Award Status
Component Number Module Code Module Title Status Credits PG Diploma PG Certificate
01 PA971-7-FY Key Texts of C G Jung Compulsory 30 Compulsory Compulsory
02 PA972-7-FY Jung in Contexts: Historical, Philosophical, Cultural Compulsory 30 Compulsory Compulsory

Year 2 - 2020/21

Exit Award Status
Component Number Module Code Module Title Status Credits PG Diploma PG Certificate
01 PA981-7-FY MA Dissertation Core 60 Optional
02 PA973-7-FY Key Concepts in Jungian and Post-Jungian Analytical Psychology Core 30 Core Core
03 PA974-7-FY Selected Applications of Analytical Psychology Core 30 Compulsory Compulsory

Exit awards

A module is given one of the following statuses: 'core' – meaning it must be taken and passed; 'compulsory' – meaning it must be taken; or 'optional' – meaning that students can choose the module from a designated list. The rules of assessment may allow for limited condonement of fails in 'compulsory' or 'optional' modules, but 'core' modules cannot be failed. The status of the module may be different in any exit awards which are available for the course. Exam Boards will consider students' eligibility for an exit award if they fail the main award or do not complete their studies.

Programme aims

This course, which can be studied part-time over 24 months or full-time over 12 months takes an informative, critical, and reflective stance to Jungian and Post-Jungian thought.

It analyses in detail key texts of Jung on myth, science, religion, and society as well as on psychological theory; investigates the historical, philosophical, and cultural background of analytical psychology; examines the central theoretical concepts of the field both as originally proposed by Jung and as developed by subsequent analytical psychologists; and explores the applicability of Jungian and Post-Jungian modes of enquiry in diverse social and cultural fields with special reference to pressing problems in contemporary Western societies.

It also prepares students to undertake independent research on topics involving Jungian and Post-Jungian thought.

Learning outcomes and learning, teaching and assessment methods

On successful completion of the programme a graduate should demonstrate knowledge and skills as follows:

A: Knowledge and understanding

A1 Thorough knowledge and critical understanding of Jung's writings on myth and of the various means (empirical, philosophical, rhetorical, etc.) by which he articulates and substantiates his psychological theory and deploys it in his critique of science, religion, and society.
A2 Thorough knowledge and critical understanding of the location of analytical psychology within the context of other relevant historical, cultural, philosophical, methodological, socio-political, and clinical dismodules.
A3 Thorough knowledge and critical understanding of the core ideas in Jungian and post-Jungian thought.
A4 Thorough knowledge and critical understanding of the possibilities and limitations of applying analytical psychology to various socio-cultural fields or topics.
Learning Methods: A1 to A4 are acquired primarily through the four modules Key Texts of C. G. Jung (PA971) addressing A1, Jung in Contexts (PA972) addressing A2, Key Concepts in Jungian and Post-Jungian Psychology (PA973) addressing A3, and Selected Applications of Analytical Psychology (PA974) addressing A4.

These modules consist of set readings and seminars that include exposition by the seminar leader, group discussion, and small group work.

Outcomes A1 to A4 are additionally acquired from research forums, individual dissertation research, one-to-one tutorials, written feedback on essays, and encouragement of students’‘ independent learning.
Assessment Methods: Outcomes A1 to A4 are assessed by four 5,000-word essays and a 12,000-word dissertation.

The essays relate specifically to the four modules mentioned above (outcome A1 is assessed by an essay for module PA971; A2 by an essay for PA972; A3 by an essay for PA973; and A4 by an essay for PA974).

B: Intellectual and cognitive skills

B1 Ability critically to evaluate the guiding ideas, underlying assumptions, forms of argument, uses of Jung.
B2 Ability to evaluate critically both primary and secondary sources for the historical, cultural, and philosophical contexts of analytical psychology.
B3 Ability to evaluate the coherence and significance of theories and concepts within analytical psychology.
B4 Ability to apply analytical psychological theory to a chosen cultural or social issue, remaining aware of the methodological problems involved.
B5 Ability to design and carry out a research project.
Learning Methods: Outcomes B1 to B4 are acquired through the four modules Key Texts of C. G. Jung (PA971) addressing B1, Jung in Contexts (PA972) addressing B2, Key Concepts in Jungian and Post-Jungian Psychology (PA973) addressing B3, and Selected Applications of Analytical Psychology (PA974) addressing B4.

These modules consist of set readings and seminars that include exposition by the seminar leader, group discussion, and small group work.

Along with outcome B5, outcomes B1 to B4 are also acquired from, research forums, individual dissertation research, one-to-one tutorials, feedback on essays, and encouragement of students’‘ independent learning.
Assessment Methods: Outcomes B1 to B4 are assessed by four 5,000-word essays and B5 by a 12,000-word dissertation.

Outcome B6 is assessed by the cumulative learning journal on a pass or fail basis.

The essays relate specifically to the four modules mentioned above (outcome B1 is assessed by an essay for module PA971; B2 by an essay for PA972; B3 by an essay for PA973; and B4 by an essay for PA974).

The dissertation (PA981) especially addresses B5 but also assesses all the intellectual and cognitive skills acquired on the course.

C: Practical skills

C1 Ability to compose knowledgeable, critical, appropriately referenced, coherently structured, and clearly written academic essays.
C2 Ability to undertake a substantial research project, applying appropriate theoretical and methodological frameworks and making effective use of library and other relevant resources (including electronic ones).
C3 Ability to produce a dissertation as a longer piece of written work that demonstrates all the qualities mentioned in C1 but is based on more in-depth research.
Learning Methods: Outcome C1 is acquired primarily through individual work on essays, one-to-one tutorials, research forums, written feedback on essays, and basic guidance included in the Post-Graduate Student Handbook and MySkills pages on the University website.

Outcomes C2 and C3 are acquired by the same means as C1 and additionally by individual dissertation work, scheduled introductions to the University Library, and research forums.
Assessment Methods: Outcome C1 is assessed by four 5,000-word essays and C2 and C3 by a 12,000-word dissertation.

D: Key skills

D1 Ability to write clearly, coherently, and concisely.
D2 (a) Ability to present word-processed essays and dissertation (b) Ability to participate in email discussions (c) Ability to make use of electronic research resources.
D3 Ability to identify, clarify, and propose solutions for problems within the field of analytical psychology.
D4 (a) Ability and willingness to discuss ideas with seminar leaders tutors/supervisors, and fellow students. (b) Ability to respond positively to constructive oral and written feedback.
Learning Methods: Outcomes D1 (a) and D4 (b) are acquired through the writing of essays and the dissertation, one-to-one tutorials, and attention to essay feedback.

Outcomes D4 (a) and D3 (b) are acquired through participation in seminars, research forums, and one-to-one tutorials.

Outcomes D2 (a) to D2 (c) are acquired through general participation in the culture of the University and the requirements of the degree, such participation being encouraged throughout the students period of study.

Outcome D3 (a) is acquired through writing essays and the dissertation and through research forums.

In all modules, students are encouraged to present ideas both in writing and orally in a manner that is intelligible to and respectful of others; to use knowledge and understanding to help further group discussions; and to give and receive constructive criticism in group discussions.
Assessment Methods: Outcomes D1, D2 (a), D2 (c), and D3 are assessed by the four 5,000-word essays and the 12,000-word dissertation.


Note

The University makes every effort to ensure that this information on its programme specification is accurate and up-to-date. Exceptionally it can be necessary to make changes, for example to courses, facilities or fees. Examples of such reasons might include a change of law or regulatory requirements, industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key personnel, change in government policy, or withdrawal/reduction of funding. Changes to courses may for example consist of variations to the content and method of delivery of programmes, courses and other services, to discontinue programmes, courses and other services and to merge or combine programmes or courses. The University will endeavour to keep such changes to a minimum, and will also keep students informed appropriately by updating our programme specifications.

The full Procedures, Rules and Regulations of the University governing how it operates are set out in the Charter, Statutes and Ordinances and in the University Regulations, Policy and Procedures.

Should you have any questions about programme specifications, please contact Course Records, Quality and Academic Development; email: crt@essex.ac.uk.