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Social Work

Course overview

(BA) Bachelor of Arts
Social Work
Current
University of Essex
University of Essex
Health and Social Care (School of)
Southend Campus
Approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) for the purpose of providing eligibility to apply for registration with the HCPC as a social worker in England.
Honours Degree
Full-time
None
BA L500
http://www.essex.ac.uk/students/exams-and-coursework/ppg/ug/default.aspx
15/04/2017

A-levels: BBB
GCSE: Mathematics and English C/4

BTEC Extended Diploma: DDM

Access to HE Diploma: 45 credits at Level 3 at merit or above

IB: 30 points, including Standard Level Mathematics or Maths Studies grade 4, if not taken at Higher Level. We are also happy to consider a combination of separate IB Diploma Programmes at both Higher and Standard Level. Please note that Maths in the IB is not required if you have already achieved GCSE Maths at grade C/4 or above or 4 in IB Middle Years Maths.

Exact offer levels will vary depending on the range of subjects being taken at higher and standard level, and the course applied for. Please contact the Undergraduate Admissions Office for more information.

Entry requirements for students studying BTEC qualifications are dependent on units studied. Advice can be provided on an individual basis. The standard required is generally at Distinction level.

Some paid or voluntary experience in health or social care in a relevant social care or child care/education setting is also required

You must also have a satisfactory Occupational Health Check and enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) Check (including child and adult barred list check) - both of these are organised by the University. A satisfactory Overseas Criminal Record Check/Local Police Certificate is also required, in addition to a DBS Check, where you have lived outside of the UK in the last 5 years for 6 months or more.

English language requirements for applicants whose first language is not English: IELTS 7.0 overall with a minimum of 6.5 in each component (or equivalent).

Other English language qualifications may be acceptable so please contact us for further details. If we accept the English component of an international qualification then it will be included in the information given about the academic levels listed above. Please note that date restrictions may apply to some English language qualifications

If you are an international student requiring a Tier 4 visa to study in the UK please see our immigration webpages for the latest Home Office guidance on English language qualifications.

If you do not meet our IELTS requirements then you may be able to complete a pre-sessional English pathway that enables you to start your course without retaking IELTS.

External Examiners

Dr Suryia Nayak
The University of Salford
Senior Lecturer

External Examiners provide an independent overview of our courses, offering their expertise and help towards our continual improvement of course content, teaching, learning, and assessment. External Examiners are normally academics from other higher education institutions, but may be from the industry, business or the profession as appropriate for the course. They comment on how well courses align with national standards, and on how well the teaching, learning and assessment methods allow students to develop and demonstrate the relevant knowledge and skills needed to achieve their awards. External Examiners who are responsible for awards are key members of Boards of Examiners. These boards make decisions about student progression within their course and about whether students can receive their final award.

eNROL, the module enrolment system, is now open until Monday 21 October 2019 8:59AM, for students wishing to make changes to their module options.

Key

Core You must take this module You must pass this module. No failure can be permitted.
Core with Options You can choose which module to study
Compulsory You must take this module There may be limited opportunities to continue on the course/be eligible for the degree if you fail.
Compulsory with Options You can choose which module to study
Optional You can choose which module to study

Year 1 - 2019/20

Component Number Module Code Module Title Status Credits
01 HS191-4-PS Introduction to Law and Social Policy Core 15
02 HS193-4-FY Lifespan Development Core 30
03 HS194-4-FY Professional Skills 1 Core 30
04 HS192-4-AU Interpersonal Skills for Practice Core 15
05 HS190-4-FY Sociological and Psychological Frameworks Core 30

Year 3 - 2021/22

Component Number Module Code Module Title Status Credits
01 HS390-6-FY Independent Study Core 30
02 HS392-6-AU Research Perspectives Core 15
03 HS394-6-FY Practice Interventions Core 30
04 HS393-6-FY Practice Placement 2 Core 30
05 HS391-6-FY Critical Reflection and Professional Challenge Core 15

Exit awards

A module is given one of the following statuses: 'core' – meaning it must be taken and passed; 'compulsory' – meaning it must be taken; or 'optional' – meaning that students can choose the module from a designated list. The rules of assessment may allow for limited condonement of fails in 'compulsory' or 'optional' modules, but 'core' modules cannot be failed. The status of the module may be different in any exit awards which are available for the course. Exam Boards will consider students' eligibility for an exit award if they fail the main award or do not complete their studies.

Programme aims

To provide practice opportunities that build skills and knowledge that supports the student to develop the skills, knowledge and values to become effective practitioners in the work place

To provide a framework within which the student can develop critical and analytical skills consistently applying their knowledge and intellectual skills and evaluating and integrating theory and practice in a wide range of situations

To provide an environment in which the student can explore potential professional conflicts:

To support them to become self-directed and able to act autonomously in planning and implementing interventions at a professional level

To provide a learning environment of high quality that supports the development of a professional who is confident, committed and resilient while recognising the challenge of engaging effectively in social work practice.

To support students to become practitioners who are adaptable, can make decisions in complex and unpredictable situations, show originality and insight with critical and reflective abilities which can all be brought to bear upon problem situations relating to own, individuals, families and groups settings and contexts

To support students to gain understanding and skills to be responsive to local and national agendas and needs within a sound ethical, legal and socio-cultural framework

Learning outcomes and learning, teaching and assessment methods

On successful completion of the programme a graduate should demonstrate knowledge and skills as follows:

A: Knowledge and understanding

A1 Describe and overview one theoretical approach with a socio-neurological focus and relate it to lifespan development (HS193.1)
A2 Outline and detail the role of evidence-based practice in effective social work through the utilisation of one or more models of practice (HS194.2)
A3 Examine the development of one theoretical approach currently used in social work practice to support interventions and the impact of the social work role (HS194.3)
A4 Explore the role of evidence based practice in effective social work provision (HS190.2)
A5 Review research literature in order to inform the development of research objectives (HS290.1)
A6 Evaluate the scope and limitations of research evidence in terms of its capacity to support conclusions (HS290.4)
A7 Explore and develop understanding of the origins and impact of legislation on individuals, organisations and the social work role (HS292.1)
A8 Outline and examine how to practise social work in ways that are ethical and lawful including recognising potential ethical dilemmas and the impact on practice (HS292.3)
A9 Evaluate assessment processes and outcomes and identify best practice within contemporary social work settings responding to potential conflicting values and expectations (HS393.1)
A10 Identify and outline policy and legislative sources (e.g. cases, reports, white papers, etc.) that inform contemporary social work practice (HS191.3)
Learning Methods: Learning Outcomes 1-12 will be delivered through: Directed pre-reading and writing tasks on different aspects of enterprise; lectures; Discussions with tutors and colleagues and mentors on the values, principles and applications of mentoring and coaching practice as they apply in organisations in the public sectors.

Directed self-study, observation and reflection of own and others practice; comparative case studies in workshops and the classroom; consultation with library materials, presentations of findings related to models, strategies and good practice; examination of critical topics Informal assessment with feedback will be made by mentors, tutors and peers.

Feedback, coupled with peer group interaction should enable students to explore and augment their understanding of the topics, and develop their skills and understanding.
Assessment Methods: The assessment methods for the programme are varied and reflect the vocational nature of the course.

Within Knowledge and Understanding the more significant assessments include examinations such as multiple choice and seen papers, presentations and reports.

The nature of exploring the knowledge base of a particular area and then engaging in a more in depth exploration and making connections with peoples needs or concerns is a vital element of the programme.

In some circumstances such as those where it is critical a student is able to explore in depth and articulate the understanding she or he has gained a presentation is an appropriate vehicle.

Assessments of presentations also include elements of peer feedback or at times peer assessment that supports students to experience some of the anxiety that the service users they work with will experience.

In the majority of assessments there are opportunities for students to engage in learning through the assessment as well as through the assignment.

B: Intellectual and cognitive skills

B1 Examine power in the construction of normality and pathology (HS193.4)
B2 Explain the process and use of a child study and the importance of effective observation for social work practice (HS193.2)
B3 Demonstrate and explore the differences between reflective and critically reflective practice (HS194.1)
B4 Apply research, theoretical insights and knowledge drawn from Psychology, Sociology and related disciplines to issues and concerns in contemporary social work practice (HS190.4)
B5 Analyse intervention methods providing clear rationales based on theory, reason and assessment (HS394.2)
B6 Critically reflect on the outcomes and impact of interventions on service users and their families, own self, organisations and others (HS393.4)
B7 Locate research projects within wider perspectives and paradigms in order to critically examine tacit assumptions (HS392.3)
B8 Describe and explain the relationships between legislation, regulations, professional codes of conduct and work place policies and procedures as they apply in social work practice
B9 Examine and explain the interdisciplinary nature of mental health, emotional and relational issues and the importance of interdisciplinary inter agency working (HS291.1)
B10 Outline and detail the ambiguous and uncertain nature of working with individuals and families with emotional, relational and mental health issues and explore the roles of advocacy skills and services in providing support (HS291.3)
B11 Evaluate the effectiveness and impact of widely used interventions in a variety of contexts, settings and situations within social work practice (HS394.1)
B12 Critique and analyse the strengths and weaknesses of intervention methods within contexts and settings (HS394.3)
B13 Define and apply concepts of social justice and human rights when examining social policy and legislation (HS191.2)
Learning Methods: Lectures; workshop exercises, preparation of individual and group-based non-assessed assignments, presentations of assignments to academic and practitioner panels; peer group work; final assessments.

Recommended directed reading, networking with external communities of practice, peer groups, practitioners.

Development of reflective journals from the beginning of the course with opportunities to evaluate and apply to their practice Lectures and directed self-study for the identification of different research paradigms, techniques and methods used to inform and support practical scenarios.

Formative assessment will consist of individual assignments, group work and oral presentations.

Related feedback, coupled with peer group interaction, should enable students to explore and augment their understanding of the topics, and develop their presentation skills.
Assessment Methods: The assessment methods for the programme are varied and reflect the vocational nature of the course.

Within Intellectual/cognitive skills the more significant assessments include presentations, mini seminars and observation-based assessments.

In this area the focus is one the ability of the student to explore and synthesise with a strong focus on the inter-relationship of practice and theory.

There is the same need to make connections with peoples needs or concerns as it is a vital element of the programme but there is additional layer of analysis and making the steps to integrate these findings with own practice.
In some circumstances such as those where it is critical a student is able to explore in depth and articulate the understanding she or he has gained a mini seminar can be the most exciting vehicle as it enables other students to learn as well and indeed for many students this is a very positive experience of assessment.

In the majority of assessments there are opportunities for students to engage in learning through the assessment as well as through the assignment.

C: Practical skills

C1 Apply a variety of interpersonal skills and strategies (HS192.2)
C2 Relate aspects of lifespan development, socio-psychological and cultural influence to a variety of situations and contexts (HS193.3)
C3 Outline and explore the use of assessment, planning and evaluation in effective social work interventions (HS194.1)
C4 Investigate issues and concerns in contemporary social work practice (HS190.3)
C5 Analyse and explore the research and evidence base of reflection, critical reflection and effective social work practice drawing conclusion and recommendations (HS391.1)
C6 Explore and demonstrate understanding of the experiences of service users and the impact of mental health, emotional and relational issues and the support available for those issues, on individuals, families and communities (HS291.2)
C7 Explore and critique intervention methods appropriate to developing and sustaining compassionate relationships when working with aggression and resistance (HS394.5)
C8 Outline and evaluate a range of theories and models of social work practice for a variety of settings and contexts (HS293.1)
C9 Explore and apply concepts and social work methods related to attachment, separation and loss, trauma and resilience (HS293.3)
C10 Utilise, implement and evaluate a holistic approach to safeguarding and protection in social work practice (HS293.4)
C11 Explore and implement a range of appropriate skills for effective social work practice (HS294.3)
C12 Examine theories and models of social work practice and relate them to own and others practice with a focus on accountability, power and responsibility (HS294.4)
C13 Demonstrate skills related to reflection on and in practice and outline the role of critical reflective practice (HS294.2)
C14 Demonstrate and explain techniques and strategies for effective support and development of emotional resilience (HS294.5)
Learning Methods: Significant learning will be gained through placement opportunities and students will be supported to learn from each other, service users and other proffessionals as well as from their formal agreed learning situations.

There is an emphasis on students recognising that learning comes from many different approaches and a flexible and open attitude is encouraged and supported.

Classwork, management of self-learning, group work and interactions with experts/specialists/colleagues will provide an informal means for assessment and feedback of the practical skills acquired by the students.
Assessment Methods: The assessment methods for the programme are varied and reflect the vocational nature of the course.

Within Practical Skills the more significant assessments include observation-based assessments both of the student ad by the student.

Students also undertake activities on placement and within college sessions that produce direct practice and these are ideal opportunities for direct observations.

As with Intellectual/cognitive skills there is an emphasis on the synthesis of practice and theory that is present in all of the assessments.
The student undertakes both formative and summative assessments in this area and there is a significant level of informal feedback in initial staged of development as high quality and effective insightful practice is essential and there are additional layers of analysis and critical reflection and making the steps to integrate these findings with own practice.

In the majority of assessments there are opportunities for students to engage in learning through the assessment as well as through the assignment.

D: Key skills

D1 Describe a range of approaches to interpersonal communication (HS192.1)
D2 Develop and reflect critically on strategies and approaches that promote professional challenge for self, others and organisations (HS391.3)
D3 Demonstrate effective skills and strategies related to courtroom practice including writing reports and verbal communication (HS292.2)
D4 Systematically sample and review research literature evaluating its relevance to a specific element of contemporary social work practice (HS392.1)
D5 Design research procedures using a variety of data collection techniques (HS290.2)
D6 Analyse research literature for sources of bias and/or unreliability (HS290.3)
D7 Propose valid research objectives and reliable methodologies for investigating a specific element of contemporary social work practice (HS392.2)
D8 Demonstrate and evaluate the methods and approaches used in undertaking a negotiated study associated with an area of personal professional practice (HS390.1)
D9 Develop a hypothesis or negotiated subject for investigation and exploration related to the development of effective social work practice (HS390.2)
D10 Contribute to the learning and development of others (HS390.3)
D11 Critically reflect on the process and outcomes of the extended study and on the students own learning and the learning of others (HS390.4)
D12 Explore and detail best practice in safeguarding and protection of children, young people and vulnerable adults (HS292.4)
D13 Demonstrate effective interpersonal skills and establish appropriate and positive relationships with service users, peers and colleagues (HS293.2)
D14 Analyse holistic assessment and detail significant elements of practice that contribute to effective practice with families and individuals (HS393.2)
D15 Reflect upon, and learn from, feedback from others on the effectiveness of own interpersonal strategies (HS192.3)
D16 Explore and evaluate own practice and approach with reference to professional body (Health and Care Profession Council) Standards of Proficiency (HS393.3)
D17 Identify, engage with and integrate social work theory and practice recognising own and other strengths and limitations appropriately
D18 Demonstrate an understanding of the relevant professional standards and how they apply to own practice
Learning Methods: All Learning Outcomes will be delivered through:

Communication in the classroom, written assignments, group work, interactions with external and internal providers and experts, placements, opportunities for informal learning and from assessments such as the child studey and the community study and the use of a variety of materials, resources and information should provide for the means of supporting and assessing the range of key skills.
Assessment Methods: The assessment methods for the programme are varied and reflect the vocational nature of the course.

Within Key Skills the more significant assessments include community and child studies, simulated cases and presentations.

The assessments frequently involve own development or those of others and support the student to self assess and to learn from their own practice.

In this area the focus is on the ability of the student to explore and synthesise with a strong focus on working with others effectively.

There is the same need to make connections with peoples needs or concerns, as it is a vital element of the programme but with a focus on insight and understanding of self.

In the majority of assessments there are opportunities for students to engage in learning through the assessment as well as through the assignment and this is an essential element of the assessments for Key Skills.


Note

The University makes every effort to ensure that this information on its programme specification is accurate and up-to-date. Exceptionally it can be necessary to make changes, for example to courses, facilities or fees. Examples of such reasons might include a change of law or regulatory requirements, industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key personnel, change in government policy, or withdrawal/reduction of funding. Changes to courses may for example consist of variations to the content and method of delivery of programmes, courses and other services, to discontinue programmes, courses and other services and to merge or combine programmes or courses. The University will endeavour to keep such changes to a minimum, and will also keep students informed appropriately by updating our programme specifications.

The full Procedures, Rules and Regulations of the University governing how it operates are set out in the Charter, Statutes and Ordinances and in the University Regulations, Policy and Procedures.

Should you have any questions about programme specifications, please contact Course Records, Quality and Academic Development; email: crt@essex.ac.uk.