SC386-6-AU-CO:
Anthropology of Race and Racism in Latin America

The details
2019/20
Sociology
Colchester Campus
Autumn
Undergraduate: Level 6
Current
Thursday 03 October 2019
Saturday 14 December 2019
15
18 July 2019

 

Requisites for this module
(none)
(none)
(none)
(none)

 

(none)

Key module for

BA LL36 Social Anthropology,
BA LL3P Social Anthropology (Including Year Abroad),
BA LL6P Social Anthropology (Including Placement Year),
BA LL37 Social Anthropology with Human Rights,
BA LL38 Social Anthropology with Human Rights (Including Year Abroad),
BA LL39 Social Anthropology with Human Rights (Including Placement Year)

Module description

This module introduces students to the anthropology of Latin America, focusing on issues surrounding race, gender and sexualities. We will briefly cover the history of race and ethnicity in Latin America before looking at more contemporary issues. We will look at how different people see various identities in sometimes radically different ways.

Module aims

To gain an understanding of contemporary Latin America through anthropology

To be familiar with a range of societies and cultures in Latin America

To have in-depth knowledge of how issues of identity, race and gender are interconnected.

To have an appreciation of culture as processual, historical and contested













A familiarity of the racial dynamics of contemporary Latin America
2. An understanding of various ways social difference can be racialised .
3. A grasp of the ways racism is internalised by groups in Latin America.
4. To be familiar with a range of societies and cultures in Latin America
5. To have in-depth knowledge of how issues of identity, race and gender are
interlaced.
6. To have an appreciation of culture as processual, historical and contested


Module learning outcomes

1. A familiarity of the racial dynamics of contemporary Latin America
2. An understanding of various ways social difference can be racialised .
3. A grasp of the ways racism is internalised by groups in Latin America.
4. To be familiar with a range of societies and cultures in Latin America
5. To have in-depth knowledge of how issues of identity, race and gender are interlaced.
6. To have an appreciation of culture as processual, historical and contested

Module information

Please note that assessment information is currently showing for 2018-19 and will be updated in August 2019

Learning and teaching methods

Two hour seminar which typically involves lecture, discussion, group work and plenary discussion. There is a particular focus on learning through discussion in pairs, small groups and plenary discussion. On some occasions there will be debates, films and independent learning.

Bibliography

This module does not appear to have a published bibliography.

Assessment items, weightings and deadlines

Coursework / exam Description Deadline Weighting
Coursework Reading Assignment 1 16/10/2019 10.714%
Coursework Reading Assignment 2 23/10/2019 10.714%
Coursework Reading Assignment 3 06/11/2019 10.714%
Coursework Reading Assignment 4 13/11/2019 10.714%
Coursework Reading Assignment 5 20/11/2019 10.714%
Coursework Reading Assignment 6 11/12/2019 10.714%
Coursework Book Review or Essay 13/01/2020 35.714%
Exam 60 minutes during Summer (Main Period) (Main)

Overall assessment

Coursework Exam
70% 30%

Reassessment

Coursework Exam
70% 30%
Module supervisor and teaching staff
Professor Andrew Canessa
Jane Harper, Student Administrator, Telephone 01206 873052, email jharper (Non Essex users should add @essex.ac.uk to create the full email address)

 

Availability
Yes
Yes
Yes

External examiner

No external examiner information available for this module.
Resources
Available via Moodle
Of 22 hours, 22 (100%) hours available to students:
0 hours not recorded due to service coverage or fault;
0 hours not recorded due to opt-out by lecturer(s).

 

Further information
Sociology

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