PA963-7-SP-CO:
Psychodynamic Theory and Practice 2

The details
2019/20
Psychosocial and Psychoanalytic Studies
Colchester Campus
Spring
Postgraduate: Level 7
Current
Monday 13 January 2020
Friday 20 March 2020
15
20 May 2019

 

Requisites for this module
(none)
(none)
(none)
(none)

 

(none)

Key module for

MA C89D24 Psychodynamic Counselling,
MA C89D36 Psychodynamic Counselling (3 year)

Module description

This module provides further theoretical and clinical seminars and workshops to deepen students' understanding of the theory and practice of psychodynamic counselling. The theory seminars extend the students' understanding of a range of typical client presentations, providing psychodynamic understanding of work with clients with a range of different symptoms/problems.

The workshops provide a more experiential and practical opportunity for learning. The clinical seminars help the students develop in their approach to clinical work, using the theoretical learning to deepen and broaden their expertise. They will develop further the student's ability to learn from the work of others, to bring creative clinical thinking to bear on a range of cases and to learn from the input of others to their own work.

Module aims

This module aims at helping students
1. To consolidate the students' capacity to operate as effective psychodynamic practitioners
2. To further extend the understanding of the clinical role in context
3. To provide further practical and theoretical support for clinical work on placement
4. To broaden and deepen understanding of client presentations
5. To broaden and deepen understanding of ways of working with them

Module learning outcomes

By the end of the module you should have:
1. Deeper understanding of the professional role of counsellor
2. Greater confidence in taking up the role as an established practitioner
3. Familiarity with a wider range of client presentations
4. Consolidated familiarity and skill in a range of different techniques used in psychodynamic work

Module information

No additional information available.

Learning and teaching methods

Theory seminars consist of a lecture component followed by discussion. Students read ahead of the seminars so they can join in discussion and bring relevant examples from their clinical work. Sometimes students might be asked to present the theoretical topic themselves. Workshops are more experiential with role-plays, practical exercises and creative approaches to the topic of the week. In clinical seminars students will present detailed descriptions of their clinical work which will be discussed with the group.

Bibliography

  • Widener, A.J. (1998) 'Beyond Ritalin: The importance of therapeutic work with parents and children diagnosed ADD/ADHD', in Journal of Child Psychotherapy. vol. 24 (2) , pp.267-281
  • Lawrence, Marilyn; Tavistock Clinic. (2008) The anorexic mind, London: Karnac.
  • M. Turp. (2008) 'Skin toughening and skin porosity: addressing the issue of self-harm by omission', in Relating to self-harm and suicide: psychoanalytic perspectives on practice, theory and prevention, New York: Routledge.
  • Kadish, Yael A. (2012) 'The Role of Culture in Eating Disorders.', in British Journal of Psychotherapy. vol. 28 (4) , pp.435-453
  • Holmes, Jeremy. (1996) Attachment, intimacy, autonomy: using attachment theory in adult psychotherapy, Northvale, NJ: J. Aronson.
  • Shuttleworth, J. (1999) 'The suffering of Asperger children and the challenge they present to psychoanalytic thinking', in Journal of Child Psychotherapy. vol. 25 (2) , pp.239-265
  • (2009) The handbook of child and adolescent psychotherapy: psychoanalytic approaches, Hove: Routledge.
  • De Zulueta, Felicity. (2006) 'The psychobiological roots of violence', in From pain to violence: the traumatic roots of destructiveness, Chichester: Wiley., pp.77-90
  • N. Parker. (2009) 'Eating Disorders', in The handbook of child and adolescent psychotherapy: psychoanalytic approaches, 2009: Routledge.
  • S. Melzak. (2009) 'Psychotherapeutic Work with child and adolescent refugees from political violence', in The handbook of child and adolescent psychotherapy: psychoanalytic approaches: Routledge.
  • Holloway, Robin. (2016) Asperger's children: psychodynamics, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment, London: Karnac.
  • McDougall, Joyce. (1989) Theatres of the body: a psychoanalytic approach to psychosomatic illness, London: Free Association.
  • Williams, Gianna Polacco. (2002) Internal landscapes and foreign bodies: eating disorders and other pathologies, London: Karnac.
  • Morrison, Andrew P. (1986) Essential papers on narcissism, New York: New York University Press. vol. Essential papers in psychoanalysis
  • J. Magagna. (2008) 'Attacks on life: suicidality & self-harm in young people', in Relating to self-harm and suicide: psychoanalytic perspectives on practice, theory and prevention, London: Routledge.
  • Freud, Sigmund. (1953-1974) The standard edition of the complete psychological works of Sigmund Freud, London: Hogarth Press and the Institute of Psycho-Analysis. vol. Vol. 14, On the History of the Psycho-Analytic Movement, Papers on Metapsychology and Other Works
  • International Suicidality and Psychoanalysis Congress. (2008) Relating to self-harm and suicide: psychoanalytic perspectives on practice, theory and prevention, Hove: Routledge.
  • Wise, Inge. (2004) Adolescence, London: Karnac.
  • M. Lanyado; J. Edwards. (2009) 'Autism: clinical and theoretical issues', in The handbook of child and adolescent psychotherapy: psychoanalytic approaches: Routledge.
  • Peter Fonagy. (2015) 'Pragmatic randomized controlled trial of long-term psychoanalytic psychotherapy for treatment-resistant depression: the Tavistock Adult Depression Study (TADS)', in World Psychiatry: World Psychiatric Association. vol. 14 (3) , pp.312-
  • Pozzi-Monzo, Maria. (2012) 'Ritalin for whom? Revisited: Further thinking on ADHD', in Journal of Child Psychotherapy. vol. 38 (1) , pp.49-60
  • M. Parsons; S. Dermen. (2009) 'The violent child and adolescent', in The handbook of child and adolescent psychotherapy: psychoanalytic approaches, Hove: Routledge.
  • Rosenbluth, Dina. (1965) 'The Kleinian theory of depression', in Journal of Child Psychotherapy. vol. 1 (3) , pp.20-25
  • Mitchell, Stephen A. (1993) Hope and dread in psychoanalysis, New York: BasicBooks.
  • David Bell. (2008) 'Who is killing what or whom?', in Relating to self-harm and suicide: psychoanalytic perspectives on practice, theory and prevention, New York: Routledge.
  • Rustin, Margaret. (2009) 'The psychology of depression in young adolescents: A psychoanalytic view of origins, inner workings and implications', in Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy. vol. 23 (3) , pp.213-224
  • Tustin, Frances. (1994) 'The perpetuation of an error.', in Journal of Child Psychotherapy,: United Kingdom : Taylor & Francis. vol. 20 (1) , pp.3-23
  • (2010) Children and adolescents in trauma: creative therapeutic approaches, London: Jessica Kingsley. vol. Community, culture and change
  • Orford, E. (1998) 'Wrestling with the whirlwind: An approach to the understanding of ADD/ADHD', in Journal of Child Psychotherapy. vol. 24 (2) , pp.253-266
  • Grinberg, León; Grinberg, Rebeca. (c1989) Psychoanalytic perspectives on migration and exile, New Haven: Yale University Press.

The above list is indicative of the essential reading for the course. The library makes provision for all reading list items, with digital provision where possible, and these resources are shared between students. Further reading can be obtained from this module's reading list.

Assessment items, weightings and deadlines

Coursework / exam Description Deadline Weighting
Coursework Essay 21/04/2020 100%

Overall assessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%

Reassessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%
Module supervisor and teaching staff
Sue Kegerreis
Student Administrator 5A.202; Tel: 01206 873745; Email: ppspgt@essex.ac.uk

 

Availability
No
No
Yes

External examiner

Dr Anne Elizabeth Worthington
Middlesex University
Senior Lecturer
Resources
Available via Moodle
Of 100 hours, 100 (100%) hours available to students:
0 hours not recorded due to service coverage or fault;
0 hours not recorded due to opt-out by lecturer(s).

 

Further information

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