PA223-5-AU-CO:
Trauma and Recovery: A Psychodynamic Approach

The details
2019/20
Psychosocial and Psychoanalytic Studies
Colchester Campus
Autumn
Undergraduate: Level 5
Current
Thursday 03 October 2019
Saturday 14 December 2019
15
20 May 2019

 

Requisites for this module
(none)
(none)
(none)
(none)

 

(none)

Key module for

FDA LX51 Therapeutic Communication and Therapeutic Organisations,
BA C847 Psychodynamic Practice,
BA C847CO Psychodynamic Practice,
BA C849 Psychodynamic Practice (Including Year Abroad),
BA C849CO Psychodynamic Practice (Including Year Abroad),
BA C890 Psychosocial and Psychoanalytic Studies,
BA C89A Psychosocial and Psychoanalytic Studies (Including Placement Year),
BA C89B Psychosocial and Psychoanalytic Studies (Including Year Abroad),
BA C89C Psychosocial and Psychoanalytic Studies (Including Foundation Year)

Module description

This module will built upon student knowledge of human development and organisational dynamics by introducing and exploring in some depth the themes of child abuse, deprivation, loss and trauma. Professional knowledge about these issues will be provided alongside a psychodynamic examination of the intra psychic, interpersonal and psycho social mechanisms involved.

The implications for organisations working with traumatised people in group living or group care are considered. This must include the defensive methods sometimes utilised to manage anxiety as well as the adaptations which can be made to strengthen the therapeutic function of the organisation.

In addition, the module aims to support the student's knowledge of psychodynamic assessment and will deepen their knowledge of the key concepts of identification, projection, projective identification, transference and countertransference.

Module aims

The aims of the module are:
To introduce topic of trauma and its place with psychoanalytic thinking
To understand the impact of trauma, deprivation and loss on children, adolescents and adults
To develop knowledge and understanding about psychodynamic assessment
To apply basic psychodynamic models of intervention in organisations

Module learning outcomes

By the end of the module students will have:
An understanding of the psychoanalytic model of trauma, its definition and its antecedence
An understanding of deprivation and loss and their impact on children and adolescents and adults
An ability to use this understanding in communicative and therapeutic techniques in one to one work
An understanding of the principles behind therapeutic practice in organisations
The capacity to influence staff discussions around therapeutic delivery of service
Ability to recognise and understand the relevance of introjective and projective processes
To recognise psychodynamic concepts such as denial, splitting, projection, displacement and identification.
An ability to recognise and utilise the concepts of transference and counter-transference
An ability to apply principles of transference and counter-transference within educational, mental health and social care settings

Module information

No additional information available.

Learning and teaching methods

There are 10 week of seminars. Teaching is 2hr duration Teaching is divided into two components. Seminar 1 is a taught seminar. Seminar 2 is a group discussion. Seminars may include workshops and other exercises.

Bibliography

  • Heimann, Paula. (1950) 'On Counter-Transference', in International Journal of Psychoanalysis. vol. 31, pp.81-84
  • Bower, Marion. (1995) 'Children and Violence', in The emotional needs of young children and their families: using psychoanalytic ideas in the community, London: Routledge., pp.264-271
  • Quinodoz, Jean-Michel. (2005) 'Studies in Hysteria', in Reading Freud: a chronological exploration of Freud's writings, Hove, East Sussex: Brunner-Routledge.
  • Kegerreis, S. (1995) 'Getting better makes it worse', in The emotional needs of young children and their families: using psychoanalytic ideas in the community, London: Routledge., pp.101-108
  • Bessel A. Van der Kolk. (1996) 'The Body Keeps the Score: Approaches to the Psychobiology of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder', in Traumatic stress: the effects of overwhelming experience on mind, body, and society, New York: Guilford Press., pp.231-
  • D. W. Winnicott. (1992) 'The Antisocial Tendency', in Through paediatrics to psycho-analysis, London: Karnac Books and the Institute of Psycho-analysis., pp.305-315
  • Margaret Hunter. (2001) 'Beginnings', in Psychotherapy with young people in care: lost and found, New York: Brunner/Routledge., pp.18-26
  • Barnes, Elizabeth. (1998) 'Nursing an Adult Survivor of Childhood Sexual Abuse', in Face to face with distress: the professional use of self in psychosocial care, Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann.
  • Rosenbluth, Dina. (1970) 'Transference in Child Psychotherapy', in Journal of Child Psychotherapy. vol. 2 (4) , pp.72-87
  • Kate Tindle. (2006) 'Negative Therapeutic Reaction', in British Journal of Psychotherapy. vol. 23 (1) , pp.99-116
  • Jones, Ernest. (1933) 'Lecture XVIII Fixation to Traumas—The Unconscious', in Introductory lectures on psycho-analysis: a course of twenty-eight lectures, London: G. Allen & Unwin.
  • Nicholson, Chris. (2010) 'Dear Little Monsters', in Children and adolescents in trauma: creative therapeutic approaches, London: Jessica Kingsley. vol. 18
  • Renos K. Papadopoulos. (2007) 'Refugees, trauma and Adversity-Activated Development', in European Journal of Psychotherapy & Counselling. vol. 9 (3) , pp.301-312
  • Dwivedi, Kedar Nath. (2010) 'No More Ghosts: The Exorcism of Traumatic Memory in Children and Adolescents', in Children and adolescents in trauma: creative therapeutic approaches, London: Jessica Kingsley. vol. Community, culture and change, pp.41-62
  • Donald Kalsched. (1996) 'Jung's Contributions to a Theory of the Self-care System', in The inner world of trauma: archetypal defenses of the personal spirit, Hove: Routledge., pp.65-75
  • Nigel C. Hunt. (2010) 'Positive outcomes of traumatic experiences', in Memory, war, and trauma, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press., pp.81-95
  • Donald Kalsched. (1996) 'Freud and Jung's Dialogue about Trauma's Inner World', in The inner world of trauma: archetypal defenses of the personal spirit, Hove: Routledge., pp.54-64
  • Henry, Gianna. (1974) 'Doubly deprived.', in Journal of Child Psychotherapy;. vol. 3 (4) , pp.15-28
  • Garland, Caroline. (1998) 'Thinking about Trauma', in Understanding trauma: a psychoanalytical approach, London: Duckworth. vol. Tavistock Clinic series
  • Papadopoulos, Renos K. (2002) 'Refugees, Home and Trauma', in Therapeutic care for refugees: no place like home, London: Karnak.
  • Zagier Roberts, V. (1998) 'When dreams become nightmares', in Managing mental health in the community: chaos and containment, London: Routledge., pp.38-48
  • Dyke, S. (1985) 'Review of D.W. Winnicott: Deprivation and Delinquency', in Journal of Child Psychotherapy. vol. 11 (2) , pp.116-120

The above list is indicative of the essential reading for the course. The library makes provision for all reading list items, with digital provision where possible, and these resources are shared between students. Further reading can be obtained from this module's reading list.

Assessment items, weightings and deadlines

Coursework / exam Description Deadline Weighting
Coursework Group Presentation - Colchester 70%
Coursework Group Presentation - Southend 30%
Coursework Essay - Colchester 13/01/2020 70%
Coursework Essay - Southend 13/01/2020 30%

Overall assessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%

Reassessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%
Module supervisor and teaching staff
Chris Nicholson
Student Administrator, 5A.202, telephone 01206 87 4969, email ppsug@essex.ac.uk

 

Availability
Yes
Yes
Yes

External examiner

Mr Nicholas Stein
University of Derby
Programme Leader MA in Art Therapy
Dr Gary Winship
University of Nottingham
Associate Professor
Mr Nicholas Stein
University of Derby
Programme Leader MA in Art Therapy
Dr Gary Winship
University of Nottingham
Associate Professor
Resources
Available via Moodle
Of 23 hours, 23 (100%) hours available to students:
0 hours not recorded due to service coverage or fault;
0 hours not recorded due to opt-out by lecturer(s).

 

Further information

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