LT121-4-FY-CO:
Approaches to Film and Media

The details
2019/20
Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies
Colchester Campus
Full Year
Undergraduate: Level 4
Current
Thursday 03 October 2019
Friday 26 June 2020
30
03 May 2019

 

Requisites for this module
(none)
(none)
(none)
(none)

 

LT122, LT226, LT833, LT834

Key module for

BA T7P3 American Studies (United States) with Film,
BA T7P4 American Studies (United States) with Film (Including Placement Year),
BA T7W6 American Studies (United States) with Film (Including Year Abroad),
BA T7W8 American Studies (United States) with Film (Including Foundation Year and Year Abroad),
BA PW38 Film and Creative Writing,
BA PW39 Film and Creative Writing (Including Placement Year),
BA PW88 Film and Creative Writing (Including Foundation Year),
BA PWH8 Film and Creative Writing (Including Year Abroad),
BA P303 Film Studies (Including Year Abroad),
BA W620 Film Studies,
BA W623 Film Studies (Including Placement Year),
BA W628 Film Studies (Including Foundation Year),
BA PV33 Film Studies and Art History (Including Year Abroad),
BA VW36 Film Studies and Art History,
BA VW37 Film Studies and Art History (Including Placement Year),
BA VW38 Film Studies and Art History (Including Foundation Year),
BA VW3B Film Studies and Art History (Including Foundation Year and Year Abroad),
BA PQ32 Film Studies and Literature (Including Year Abroad),
BA PQ38 Film Studies and Literature (Including Foundation Year),
BA QW26 Film Studies and Literature,
BA QW27 Film Studies and Literature (Including Placement Year),
BA V1W6 History with Film Studies,
BA V1W7 History with Film Studies (Including Placement Year),
BA V1W8 History with Film Studies (Including Foundation Year),
BA V1WP History with Film Studies (Including Year Abroad)

Module description

This is an extensive survey of cinema which foregrounds its historical and international diversity. The module is designed to engage with three key areas: cinema as an aesthetic or artistic medium; cinema history and its social contexts, ranging from the late-nineteenth to the twentieth-first centuries; and film and media theory, looking at cinematic media (from celluloid to digital) both as cultural productions and as texts received, and consumed, by audiences.

The module will cover a range of cinema history, from nineteenth-century photographic technology and early cinema projection, to the rise of synch sound, and finally to more recent trends in genre and production innovation. In the first term, central concepts of cinematic form will be explored, such as editing, montage, mise-en-scene, sound, lighting, and camera movement. The second term will delve more deeply into theoretical issues, including concepts of genre, auteur, technology, and postmodernity.

The module features an extensive lecture programme over the year, delivered by Film Studies staff. Every student should attend the weekly lecture/screening, and seminar.

Background in writing for the humanities and/or media studies is recommended. Students registered for any film studies degree, for which LT121 is a pre-requisite, have priority in applying for the places available on this course.

Lecturers on LT121 are leading international writers and researchers in film and media studies. One of the key texts on the module, Film Analysis: A Norton Reader (expanded edition 2013), is used worldwide as a film teaching and research resource; edited by the LT121 module supervisor, it contains useful essays written by lecturers who contribute to the module.

These lecturers have themselves published widely in areas such as early cinema, American film, Russian cinema, World Cinema, and independent cinema; and it is these areas, among others, that LT121 students will explore in their own research essays.

Module aims

The aims of the module are:

1. To provide understanding of forms of communication in film and media as they have emerged historically
2. To promote an appreciation of the processes through which film media come into being, with reference to social, cultural, and technological change
3. To explore the forces and contexts that influence film and media , and support means to understand and explain these forces
4. To encourage critical understanding of a diverse and international range of film and media texts
5. To explore the role of changing technology in film and media production, distribution, access, participation, and diverse modes of reception
6. To introduce established conceptual frameworks and theoretical models for approaching film and media analysis
7. To enhance skills in written and verbal communication

Module learning outcomes

After successful completion of this module, students will have:

1. an ability to analyse communication systems, modes of representation, and systems of meaning in film and media
2. an ability to evaluate the ways in which of a range of media form and organise understandings, meanings, and affects within popular culture
3. an ability to research and explain aspects of the production and consumption of film and media products within their cultural contexts
4. an ability to understand the historical development of a range of film and media texts and their impact within and upon their cultural contexts
5. improved skills in written and verbal communication

Module information

No additional information available.

Learning and teaching methods

Weekly 1-hour lecture and 1-hour class as well as a weekly screening

Bibliography

  • Turim, Maureen. (c1990) 'Gentlemen Consume Blondes', in Issues in feminist film criticism, Bloomington: Indiana University Press., pp.101-111
  • Billy Wilder. (1959) Some like it hot, London: MGM/UA Home Video.
  • Rainer Werner Fassbinder. (2006) Fear eats the soul, [S.l.]: Arrow Films. vol. Arrow Films World
  • Michael Walker. (1978) 'Black Narcissus', in Framework: University of Warwick Arts Federation. (9)
  • (©2016) Film theory and criticism: introductory readings, New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Pudovkin. (©2016) 'On Editing and Eisenstein', in Film theory and criticism: introductory readings, New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Geiger, Jeffrey; Rutsky, R. L. (2013) Film analysis: a Norton reader, New York: W. W. Norton & Company.
  • Scott Bukatman. (2007) 'Who Programs You? The Science Fiction of the Spectacle', in Liquid metal: the science fiction film reader, New York, NY: Wallflower Press., pp.311-325
  • Wells, Paul. (1998) 'Notes Towards a Theory of Animation: Styles and Approaches', in Understanding animation, London: Routledge., pp.35-36
  • Morris, Christopher D. (©2009) 'Psycho's Allegory of Seeing', in A Hitchcock reader, Chichester: Blackwell Publishing., pp.361-367
  • Gorky, Maxim. (1960) 'A Review of the Lumière Programme', in Kino: a history of the Russian and Soviet film, London: Allen & Unwin.
  • Tom Gunning. (©2016) 'An Aesthetic of Astonishment: Early Film and the (In)credulous Spectator', in Film theory and criticism: introductory readings, New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Michael Powell; Emeric Pressburger. (1946) Black narcissus, S.l: Archers/Rank Organisation.
  • Truffaut, François. (1981) 'Une certaine tendance du cinema français', in Theories of authorship: a reader, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul in association with the British Film Institute. vol. British Film Institute readers in film studies
  • Anna Freud. (1953-1974) 'Screen Memories', in The standard edition of the complete psychological works of Sigmund Freud, London: Hogarth Press and the Institute of Psycho-Analysis. vol. 3, pp.301-322
  • Buscombe, Edward. (©2012) 'The Idea of Genre in American Cinema', in Film genre reader IV, Austin, Tex: University of Texas Press.
  • Bunuel, Luis. (2013) 'Dreams and reveries', in My last sigh: the autobiography of Luis Buñuel, New York: Vintage Books.
  • Prawer, S. S. (1979) 'The Iconography of the Terror-film', in Caligari's children: the film as tale of terror, New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Bordwell, David. (1986) 'Godard and narration', in Narration in the fiction film, London: Routledge.
  • Tateishi, Ramie. (2003) 'The Japanese Horror Film Series: Ring and Eko Eko Azarak', in Fear without frontiers: horror cinema across the globe, Godalming: FAB.
  • Bunuel, Luis. (2013) 'Surrealism', in My last sigh: the autobiography of Luis Buñuel, New York: Vintage Books.
  • Jeff Smith. (2016) 'Narrative form in Citizen Kane', in Film art: an introduction, New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Education., pp.118-128
  • Gunning, Tom. (1994) 'An Aesthetic of Astonishment: Early Film and the (In)credulous Spectator', in Viewing Positions, New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press., pp.114-133
  • Godard, Jean-Luc; Seberg, Jean; Belmondo, Jean-Paul. (c2010) Breathless: = A bout de souffle, U.K.: Optimum Releasing.
  • Doherty, Thomas. (1999) 'This is Where We Came In: The Audible Screen and the Voluble Audience in Early Sound Cinema', in American movie audiences: from the turn of the century to the early sound era, London: BFI Pub.
  • Nichols, Bill. (2013) 'Battleship Potemkin', in Film analysis: a Norton reader, New York: W. W. Norton & Company., pp.158-177
  • Giannetti, Louis D. (©2018) Understanding movies, Boston: Pearson.
  • Buscombe, Edward. (1981) 'Ideas of authorship', in Theories of authorship: a reader, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul in association with the British Film Institute. vol. British Film Institute readers in film studies
  • Garrett Stewart. (2007) Framed time: toward a postfilmic cinema, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • (200-) The Lumiere Brothers, London: BFI Video.
  • Kuhn, Annette. (2007) 'Classical Hollywood style', in The cinema book, London: BFI.
  • Smith, Jeff. (©2017) 'Breathless', in Film art: an introduction, New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Education., pp.418-422
  • Maria DiBattista. (2001) 'Female Rampant: His Girl Friday', in Fast-talking dames, New Haven: Yale University Press., pp.268-297
  • Méliès, George. (200-) Voyage to the Moon, London: BFI Video.
  • Paul Verhoeven. (1990) Total recall, London: Studiocanal.
  • Austin, Guy. (c1996) 'Fantasy outside the look', in Contemporary French cinema: an introduction, Manchester: Manchester University Press., pp.135-136
  • Christine Cornea. (2007) 'Interview: Director Paul Verhoeven', in Science fiction cinema: between fantasy and reality, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press., pp.134-144
  • Wallis, Tom. (©2011) 'Genre', in Film: a critical introduction, London: Laurence King Publishing., pp.381-404
  • Wood, Robin. (1978) 'Return of the repressed', in Film Comment. vol. 14 (4) , pp.24-32
  • Laura Mulvey. (2001) 'Unmasking the Gaze: Some Thoughts on New Feminist Film Theory and History', in Lectora: revista de dones i textualitat. (7) , pp.5-14
  • David Bordwell. (1988) 'An excessively obvious cinema', in The classical Hollywood cinema: film style & mode of production to 1960, London: Routledge., pp.3-11
  • Littau, Karin. (2013) 'Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat', in Film analysis: a Norton reader, New York: W. W. Norton & Company., pp.42-62
  • Edison, Thomas A. (c1994) The great train robbery, [S.l.]: Film Preservation Associates. vol. Blackhawk Films collection
  • Monaco, James. (c2009) 'Aspect ratio', in How to read a film: movies, media, and beyond : art, technology, language, history, theory, Oxford: Oxford University Press., pp.117-123
  • Breton, Andre. (2006) 'As in a wood', in The sources of surrealism: art in context, Aldershot: Lund Humphries.
  • Sergei Eisenstein. (©2016) 'Beyond the Shot', in Film theory and criticism: introductory readings, New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Gene Kelly; Stanley Donen. (1952) Singin' in the rain, [U.K.]: Turner Home Entertainment/Warner Bros. Home Entertainment.
  • Lieberfeld, Daniel; Sanders, Judith. (1998-01) 'Keeping the Characters Straight: Comedy and Identity', in Journal of Popular Film and Television. vol. 26 (3) , pp.128-135
  • (2013) Film analysis: a Norton reader, New York: W. W. Norton & Company.
  • Hawks, Howard; Russell, Jane; Monroe, Marilyn. (c2007) Gentlemen prefer blondes, [U.K.]: 20th Century Fox.
  • Sergei Eisenstein. (©2016) 'The Dramaturgy of Film Form', in Film theory and criticism: introductory readings, New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Gene Kelly; Stanley Donen. (1952) Singin' in the Rain: Turner Home Entertainment/Warner Bros. Home Entertainment.
  • Musser, Charles. (1990) 'The Travel Genre in 1903-1904: Moving Towards Fictional Narrative', in Early cinema: space frame narrative, London: BFI., pp.123-132
  • Napier, Susan J. (2005) 'Princess Mononoke, Fantasy, the Feminine, and the Myth of Progress', in Anime from Akira to Howl's moving castle: experiencing contemporary Japanese animation, New York: Palgrave Macmillan., pp.175-191
  • Boyd, Ernest. (1928) 'Sights and Sounds: Talkie, talkie', in The Bookman; a Review of Books and Life (1895-1933). vol. 68 (1) , pp.72-74
  • Smith, Jeff. (©2017) 'Continuity Editing', in Film art: an introduction, New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Education., pp.230-253
  • Sidney Gottlieb. (1995) 'On Style: An Interview with Cinema', in Hitchcock on Hitchcock: selected writings and interviews, Berkeley: University of California Press., pp.285-302
  • Bordwell, David. (1986) 'Art-cinema narration', in Narration in the fiction film, London: Routledge.
  • John Belton. (©2016) 'Technology and Aesthetics of Film Sound', in Film theory and criticism: introductory readings, New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Green, Fitzhugh. (1929) 'Jolson takes a leap', in The film finds its tongue, London: G.P. Putnam's Sons.
  • Luis Buñuel; Salvador Dalí. (2004) Un chien andalou: L'âge d'or, [S.l.]: BFI.
  • Luc Besson. (2000) Leon, London: Touchstone Home Video.
  • Garrett Stewart. (2007) 'Temportation', in Framed time: toward a postfilmic cinema, Chicago: University of Chicago Press., pp.124-155
  • Coates, Paul. (2013) 'The Cabinet of Dr Caligari', in Film analysis: a Norton reader, New York: W. W. Norton & Company., pp.98-117
  • Neupert, Richard. (2013) 'Breathless', in Film analysis: a Norton reader, New York: W. W. Norton & Company., pp.566-581
  • Ruth Perlmutter. (2002) 'Multiple strands and possible worlds', in Canadian Journal of Film Studies. vol. 11 (2) , pp.44-61
  • Hayward, Susan. (1998) 'Luc Besson: the emerging filmmaker', in Luc Besson, Manchester: Manchester University Press. vol. French film directors
  • Naremore, James. (2013) 'Citizen Kane', in Film analysis: a Norton reader, New York: W. W. Norton & Company., pp.340-360
  • Chaudhuri, Shohini. (2013) 'Ali: Fear Eats the Soul. An Anatomy of Racism', in Film analysis: a Norton reader, New York: W. W. Norton & Company., pp.640-659
  • Sergei Eisenstein. (©2016) 'The Cinematic Principle and Ideogram', in Film theory and criticism: introductory readings, New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Wood, Robin. (c2002) 'Psycho', in Hitchcock's films revisited, New York: Columbia University Press.
  • Nakata, Hideo; Suzuki, Koji; Matsushima, Nanako. (2004) Ring, London: Tartan Video. vol. Tartan Asia Extreme
  • Sergei Eisenstein. (©2016) 'Dickens, Griffith and Ourselves', in Film theory and criticism: introductory readings, New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Kristin Thompson. (1988) 'Deep focus cinematography', in The classical Hollywood cinema: film style & mode of production to 1960, London: Routledge., pp.341-352
  • Siegfried Kracauer. (2004) 'The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari', in Film theory and criticism: introductory readings, New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Tom Whalen. (2000) 'Run Lola Run (Review)', in Film Quarterly. vol. 53 (3) , pp.33-40
  • Wells, Paul. (1998) 'Thinking about Animated Films: What is Animation?', in Understanding animation, London: Routledge., pp.10-11
  • Tom Tykwer. (1999) Run Lola run, Culver City: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment.
  • McVay, Douglas. (1982) 'Michael Powell: three neglected films', in Films and filming. vol. 328, pp.18-25
  • Conley, Tom. (2013) 'Un chien Andalou', in Film analysis: a Norton reader, New York: W. W. Norton & Company.
  • Michel Gondry. (2004) Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind, [S.l.]: Focus Features.
  • Andre Bazin. (©2016) 'The Evolution of the Language of Cinema', in Film theory and criticism: introductory readings, New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Cardiff, Jack. (c1996) Magic hour, London: Faber and Faber.
  • Christine Cornea. (2007) 'Internalising Performance', in Science fiction cinema: between fantasy and reality, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press., pp.231-237
  • Alison Landsberg. (2004) 'Prosthetic Memory: Total Recall and Blade Runner', in Liquid metal: the science fiction film reader, London: Wallflower., pp.326-338

The above list is indicative of the essential reading for the course. The library makes provision for all reading list items, with digital provision where possible, and these resources are shared between students. Further reading can be obtained from this module's reading list.

Assessment items, weightings and deadlines

Coursework / exam Description Deadline Weighting
Coursework Spring: Film Diary and Participation 5%
Coursework Formative Assignment 11/11/2019 0%
Coursework Essay 1 (2,000 - 2,500 words) 13/12/2019 45%
Coursework Autumn: Film Diary and Participation 15/01/2020 5%
Coursework Essay 2 (2,000 - 2,500 words) 20/03/2020 45%
Exam 180 minutes during Summer (Main Period) (Main)

Overall assessment

Coursework Exam
50% 50%

Reassessment

Coursework Exam
50% 50%
Module supervisor and teaching staff
Various
LiFTS General Office - email liftstt@essex.ac.uk. Telephone 01206 872626

 

Availability
Yes
Yes
No

External examiner

Dr Mikel Koven
Senior Lecturer - Film Studies
Resources
Available via Moodle
Of 162 hours, 101 (62.3%) hours available to students:
61 hours not recorded due to service coverage or fault;
0 hours not recorded due to opt-out by lecturer(s).

 

Further information

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