LT111-4-FY-CO:
Origins and Transformations in Literature and Drama

The details
2019/20
Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies
Colchester Campus
Full Year
Undergraduate: Level 4
Current
Thursday 04 October 2018
Friday 28 June 2019
30
27 March 2019

 

Requisites for this module
(none)
(none)
(none)
(none)

 

LT209

Key module for

BA W800 Creative Writing,
BA W801 Creative Writing (Including Year Abroad),
BA W803 Creative Writing (Including Placement Year),
BA W808 Creative Writing (Including Foundation Year),
BA QW24 Drama and Literature,
BA QW25 Drama and Literature (Including Placement Year),
BA WQ28 Drama and Literature (Including Foundation Year),
BA WQ42 Drama and Literature (Including Year Abroad),
BA QT37 English and United States Literature (Including Year Abroad),
BA T720 English and United States Literature,
BA T723 English and United States Literature (Including Placement Year),
BA T728 English and United States Literature (Including Foundation Year),
BA QQ23 English Language and Literature,
BA QQ24 English Language and Literature (Including Foundation Year),
BA QQ32 English Language and Literature (Including Year Abroad),
BA QQ35 English Language and Literature (Including Placement Year),
BA Q300 English Literature,
BA Q303 English Literature (Including Placement Year),
BA Q320 English Literature (Including Foundation Year),
BA Q321 English Literature (Including Year Abroad),
BA PQ32 Film Studies and Literature (Including Year Abroad),
BA PQ38 Film Studies and Literature (Including Foundation Year),
BA QW26 Film Studies and Literature,
BA QW27 Film Studies and Literature (Including Placement Year),
BA QV21 History and Literature,
BA QV22 History and Literature (Including Placement Year),
BA QV2C History and Literature (Including Foundation Year),
BA VQ12 History and Literature (Including Year Abroad),
BA QV23 Literature and Art History,
BA QV24 Literature and Art History (Including Placement Year),
BA QV2H Literature and Art History (Including Foundation Year),
BA QV32 Literature and Art History (Including Year Abroad),
BA QV3B Literature and Art History (Including Foundation Year and Year Abroad),
BA LQ32 Literature and Sociology,
BA LQ33 Literature and Sociology (Including Placement Year),
BA LQ38 Literature and Sociology (Including Foundation Year),
BA QL23 Literature and Sociology (Including Year Abroad),
BA QV25 Philosophy and Literature,
BA QV26 Philosophy and Literature (Including Placement Year),
BA VQ52 Philosophy and Literature (Including Foundation Year),
BA VQ52JS Philosophy and Literature (Including Foundation Year),
BA VQ58 Philosophy and Literature (Including Foundation Year and Year Abroad),
BA VQ58JS Philosophy and Literature (Including Foundation Year and Year Abroad),
BA VQ5F Philosophy and Literature (Including Year Abroad),
BA QW30 Literature and Creative Writing,
BA QW31 Literature and Creative Writing (Including Year Abroad),
BA QW33 Literature and Creative Writing (Including Placement Year),
BA QW38 Literature and Creative Writing (Including Foundation Year),
BA Q210 English and Comparative Literature,
BA Q211 English and Comparative Literature (Including Year Abroad),
BA Q212 English and Comparative Literature (Including Placement Year),
BA Q218 English and Comparative Literature (Including Foundation Year),
BA P530 Journalism and Literature,
BA P531 Journalism and Literature (Including Placement Year),
BA P532 Journalism and Literature (Including Year Abroad)

Module description

Which writers re-worked Homer’s Odyssey? Or borrowed ideas from Dante’s Inferno? Examine how key literary texts and genres from across world literature have been used and transformed by successive generations of writers up until the present day.

This module explores how ancient and foundational literary texts and stories continue to speak to us, and to inspire writers, many of whom have adopted, and adapted, their themes and form, to create new masterpieces. How have we inherited genre definitions such as tragedy and comedy? How have key themes like madness, the underworld and the outsider inspired some of the greatest books, plays, stories and poetry ever written?

Module aims

The aims of this module are: 1. to provide students with an understanding of key literary genres and themes as a foundation upon which they can build throughout their degree 2. to enable students to draw links between texts from different centuries, cultures and continents 3. to help students develop a critical understanding of the ways in which key literary texts and genres are borrowed from, re-written or re-worked by successive generations of writers 4. to develop students' ability to trace literary origins and critically evaluate the complex links and fissures across cultural traditions.

Module learning outcomes

At the end of this module, students should be able to: 1. demonstrate an understanding of key literary genres and themes 2. establish and critically interrogate any links between texts from different centuries, cultures and continents 3. evidence their critical understanding of the ways in which key literary texts and genres are borrowed from, re-written or re-worked by successive generations of writers

Module information

This is an introductory survey module. The twenty lectures cover a wide range of world literature, and each lecturer speaks on an area related to their particular field of expertise. The module is a showcase of the Department's research specialities, which we introduce to our students at the very outset of their studies with us.

Learning and teaching methods

Weekly 1-hour lecture and 1-hour class

Bibliography*

  • Shakespeare, William; Miola, Robert S. (c2011) Hamlet: text of the play, the actors' gallery, contexts, criticism, afterlives, resources, New York: W.W. Norton & Co.
  • Dante Alighieri (translated by Mark Musa). (no date) 'The Inferno', in The Divine Comedy, Harmondsworth: Penguin Books. vol. The Penguin classics, pp.19-127
  • McCullers, Carson. (no date) The Ballad of the Sad Café, London: Penguin. vol. Penguin classics
  • Virgil; (Translated by Seamus Heaney). (no date) The Aeneid, Book VI, London: Faber & Faber.
  • Homer (Translated by Robert Fagles). (no date) The Odyssey, London: Penguin.
  • Bram Stoker. (no date) Dracula, Oxford: Oxford University Press. vol. Oxford world's classics
  • Virgina Woolf; Tilda Swinton. (2017) Orlando, Edinburgh: Canongate Book.
  • Molière. (1959; reprinted 2001) 'Tartuffe', in The Misanthrope and Other Plays, Baltimore, MD: Penguin. vol. The Penguin classics
  • Ovid; (Translated by A. D. Melville). (no date) Metamorphoses, Oxford: Oxford University Press. vol. Oxford world's classics
  • Marlene Nourbese Philip; Evie Shockley. (2014) She tries her tongue, her silence softly breaks, Middletown, Connecticut: Wesleyan University Press.
  • Aristotle (translated by Malcolm Heath). (no date) Poetics, London: Penguin Books. vol. Penguin classics
  • Homer; Martin Hammond; Jasper Griffin. (2014) The Odyssey, London: Bloomsbury.
  • Shakespeare, William; (Edited by Harold Brooks). (no date) A Midsummer Night's Dream, London: Arden Shakespeare. vol. The Arden edition of the works of William Shakespeare ; second series
  • Sophocles (Translated by Robert Fagles). (no date) 'Oedipus the King', in The Three Theban Plays: Antigone; Oedipus the King; Oedipus at Colonus, Harmondsworth: Penguin Books. vol. Penguin classics, pp.70-119
  • Charlotte Perkins Gilman; Dale M. Bauer. (1892, reprinted 1998; 2009) The yellow wallpaper, Basingstoke: Macmillan.
  • Cicely Hamilton; Christopher St John. (2013) 'How the vote was won', in The Methuen drama book of suffrage plays, London: Bloomsbury Methuen Drama.
  • Camus, Albert; Smith, Sandra. (2013) The outsider, London: Penguin Books.
  • Atwood, Margaret. (no date) The Penelopiad, Edinburgh: Canongate. vol. The Myths series
  • Faulkner, William. (1958) 'A Rose for Emily', in These thirteen: [stories], London: Chatto & Windus. vol. 2, pp.9-20
  • (no date) The Epic of Gilgamesh, Harmondsworth: Penguin Book.

The above list is indicative of the essential reading for the course. The library makes provision for all reading list items, with digital provision where possible, and these resources are shared between students. Further reading can be obtained from this module's reading list.
Assessment items, weightings and deadlines
Coursework / exam Description Deadline Weighting
Coursework Formative Assignment: Essay plan 0%
Coursework Essay (2,500-3,000 words) 50%
Practical Presentation (Week 32) 40%
Practical Participation 10%
Exam 180 minutes during Summer (Main Period) (Main)
Overall assessment
Coursework:
50%
Exam:
50%
Reassessment
Coursework:
0%
Exam:
0%
Module supervisor and teaching staff
Various
LiFTS General Office - email liftstt@essex.ac.uk. Telephone 01206 872626

 

Availability
Yes
Yes
No

External examiner

Prof Duncan James Salkeld
Professor of Shakespeare and Renaissance Literature
Resources
Available via Moodle
Of 176 hours, 170 (96.6%) hours available to students:
6 hours not recorded due to service coverage or fault;
0 hours not recorded due to opt-out by lecturer(s).

 

Further information

* Please note: due to differing publication schedules, items marked with an asterisk (*) base their information upon the previous academic year.

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