LG218-5-AU-CO:
Sociolinguistics

The details
2019/20
Linguistics
Colchester Campus
Autumn
Undergraduate: Level 5
Current
Thursday 03 October 2019
Saturday 14 December 2019
15
08 April 2019

 

Requisites for this module
LG114
(none)
(none)
(none)

 

LG353

Key module for

BA QP10 English Language with Media Communication,
BA QP11 English Language with Media Communication (Including Year Abroad),
BA QP12 English Language with Media Communication (Including Placement Year)

Module description

In this survey of the study of language and society, we look at how language is actually used, how people feel about it-- how the two are often opposed -- and how the structure of language interacts with both. We consider language as a resource to convey cultural and personal identity, and what it reveals of language attitudes and social structure -- and therefore of status and inequality in areas such as social class, gender, age, and ethnicity. We see how social identity illuminates variation in language, and learn about such topics as regional and social dialects, language rights, and language variation and change.

Module aims

To familiarise students with:
The basic principles of sociolinguistics and language variation,
How different varieties and features of language spread, change or disappear,
The key findings of variationist sociolinguistics, examining language variation and the social, linguistic & contextual characteristics which help to shape it.

Module learning outcomes

Students will be able to:
Distinguish varieties and functions of language and their social distribution,
Understand core concepts in dialectology and its relation to sociolinguistics,
Describe how norms, attitudes and standards arise, and explain how they affect language behavior and society,
Examine variation and change in vernacular data and explain its systematic patterning,
Assimilate key variationist literature on the social, linguistic & contextual characteristics which help to shape language structure, change and use,
Interpret quantitative data and graphic representations of vernacular language variation.

Module information

No additional information available.

Learning and teaching methods

One 2-hr lecture per week;

Bibliography

  • Labov, William. (2012) 'Chapter 2', in Dialect diversity in America, Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. vol. Page-Barbour lectures for 2009
  • Meyerhoff, Miriam. (2019) Introducing sociolinguistics, Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Mesthrie, Rajend. (c2009) Introducing sociolinguistics, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
  • Chambers, J. K. (2009) Sociolinguistic theory: linguistic variation and its social significance, Chichester: WileyBlackwell. vol. Language in society
  • Cameron, Deborah. (2007-10-01) 'What Language Barrier?', in Guardian.
  • Labov, William. (2012) 'Chapter 3 of Dialect diversity in America: "Hidden diversity"', in Dialect diversity in America: the politics of language change, Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. vol. Page-Barbour lectures for 2009
  • Linguistic Society of America Committee on Social & Political Concerns, 1995: Statement on Language Rights, http://www.linguisticsociety.org/files/lsa-stmt-language-rights.pdf
  • Dragojevic, M; Giles, H; Watson, B. (2013) 'Language Ideologies and Language Attitudes: A foundational framework', in The social meanings of language, dialect and accent: international perspectives on speech styles, New York: Peter Lang. vol. Language as social action, pp.1-25
  • Lippi-Green, Rosina. (2012) English with an accent: language, ideology and discrimination in the United States, Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Interactive IPA (phonetic symbol) Charts, http://www.yorku.ca/earmstro/ipa/
  • Labov, William. (2012) 'Chapter 1 of Dialect Diversity in America', in Dialect diversity in America: the politics of language change, Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. vol. Page-Barbour lectures for 2009
  • Universal Declaration of Linguistic Rights, http://www.linguistic-declaration.org/index-gb.htm
  • Labov, William. (2009) 'The social stratification of (r) in New York City department stores', in The new sociolinguistics reader, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan., pp.49-59
  • Cameron, Deborah. (2007-10-03) 'Back down to Earth', in Guardian.
  • Labov, William. (c1972) 'The social stratification of (r) in New York City department stores', in Sociolinguistic patterns, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. vol. Conduct and communication, pp.43-69
  • Christina Bratt Paulston. (1997) 'Language Policies and Language Rights', in Annual Review of Anthropology. vol. 26, pp.73-85
  • Cameron, Deborah. (2007-10-02) 'Speak up, I can't hear you', in Guardian.
  • Wolfram, Walt; Schilling-Estes, Natalie. (2016) American English: dialects and variation, Chichester: Wiley Blackwell. vol. 25
  • Bell, Allan. (2009) 'Language style as audience design', in The new sociolinguistics reader, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan., pp.265-275
  • Guidelines for the use of Language Analysis in relation to questions of national origin in refugee cases, http://www.essex.ac.uk/larg/resources/guidelines.aspx
  • Queen, Robin. (2013) 'Gender, sex, sexuality and sexual identities', in The handbook of language variation and change, [Hoboken]: Wiley-Blackwell., pp.368-387
  • Labov, William. (c1972) 'Hypercorrection by the lower middle class as a factor in linguistic change', in Sociolinguistic patterns, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. vol. Conduct and communication, pp.122-142
  • Milroy, James; Milroy, Lesley. (2012) Authority in language: investigating standard English, Abingdon: Routledge.

The above list is indicative of the essential reading for the course. The library makes provision for all reading list items, with digital provision where possible, and these resources are shared between students. Further reading can be obtained from this module's reading list.

Assessment items, weightings and deadlines

Coursework / exam Description Deadline Weighting
Coursework In-Class Test 40%
Coursework Data Problem 15/11/2019 20%
Coursework Essay 17/01/2020 40%

Overall assessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%

Reassessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%
Module supervisor and teaching staff
Prof Peter Patrick
Prof P. Patrick, Office: 4.328, Tel: 01206 872088, Email: patrickp@essex.ac.uk

 

Availability
Yes
No
No

External examiner

Dr Lynne Julie Cahill
University of Sussex
Lecturer
Resources
Available via Moodle
Of 18 hours, 17 (94.4%) hours available to students:
1 hours not recorded due to service coverage or fault;
0 hours not recorded due to opt-out by lecturer(s).

 

Further information
Linguistics

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