LA893-7-AU-CO:
Simultaneous Interpreting

The details
2019/20
Language and Linguistics
Colchester Campus
Autumn
Postgraduate: Level 7
Current
Thursday 03 October 2019
Saturday 14 December 2019
15
25 April 2019

 

Requisites for this module
(none)
(none)
(none)
(none)

 

(none)

Key module for

MA T1Q912 Conference Interpreting and Translation (Chinese-English)

Module description

This 10-week course aims to develop an advanced understanding of the profession of simultaneous interpreting (SI) by exposing trainees to guided exercises and simulated practice designed for them to master the skills involved in simultaneous interpreting. The course is skilled-based, that is to say, the choice and order of the materials, the time allocated to each class and the way in which classes are conducted all centre upon and work for a step-by-step consolidation of major SI skills.

Working in conference interpreting settings, trainees are required to incorporate coping tactics and language skills with sufficient background knowledge in subject areas for conference interpreting. Working in pairs in the booths, trainees are also required to work as booth partners under peer pressure.

Qualified trainees are supposed to be skilled at transferring Chinese and English language in both directions, i.e., English into Chinese and Chinese into English simultaneously. When the course finishes, trainees should be able to work professionally on medium or higher speech level in the subject areas that we covered and confidently know how to prepare the background knowledge of new areas.

Module aims

This 10-week course aims to develop an advanced understanding of the profession of simultaneous interpreting (SI) by exposing trainees to guided exercises and simulated practice designed for them to master the skills involved in simultaneous interpreting. The course is skilled-based, that is to say, the choice and order of the materials, the time allocated to each class and the way in which classes are conducted all centre upon and work for a step-by-step consolidation of major SI skills. Working in conference interpreting settings, trainees are required to incorporate coping tactics and language skills with sufficient background knowledge in subject areas for conference interpreting. Working in pairs in the booths, trainees are also required to work as booth partners under peer pressure.

Qualified trainees are supposed to be skilled at transferring Chinese and English language in both directions, i.e., English into Chinese and Chinese into English simultaneously. When the course finishes, trainees should be able to work professionally on medium or higher speech level in the subject areas that we covered and confidently know how to prepare the background knowledge of new areas.

Module learning outcomes

When the course finishes, trainees should be able to work professionally on medium or higher speech level in the subject areas that we covered and confidently know how to prepare the background knowledge of new areas.

Module information

No additional information available.

Learning and teaching methods

The course is skilled-based, that is to say, the choice and order of the materials, the time allocated to each class and the way in which classes are conducted all centre upon and work for a step-by-step consolidation of major SI skills. Working in conference interpreting settings, trainees are required to incorporate coping tactics and language skills with sufficient background knowledge in subject areas for conference interpreting. Working in pairs in the booths, trainees are also required to work as booth partners under peer pressure.

Bibliography

  • ????. (no date) ????????? - ???? - Google Books: ??????????, 2001.
  • Setton, Robin. (c2011) Interpreting Chinese, interpreting China, Amsterdam: John Benjamins. vol. v. 29
  • Monacelli, Claudia. (c2009) Self-preservation in simultaneous interpreting: surviving the role, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Pub. vol. v. 84
  • Gambier, Yves; Gile, Daniel; Taylor, Christopher; International Conference on Interpreting--What Do We Know and How?. (c1997) Conference interpreting: current trends in research : proceedings of the International Conference on Interpreting : What Do We Know and How? : Turku, August 25-27, 1994, Amsterdam: J. Benjamins. vol. v. 23
  • ???. (no date) ?????????: ??????????, 2003.
  • Chernov, G. V.; Setton, Robin; Hild, Adelina. (c2004) Inference and anticipation in simultaneous interpreting: a probability-prediction model, Amsterdam: J. Benjamins. vol. v. 57
  • Tirkkonen-Condit, Sonja; Jääskeläinen, Riitta; Symposium on Translation Processes. (c2000) Tapping and mapping the processes of translation and interpreting: outlooks on empirical research, Amsterdam: John Benjamins. vol. v. 37
  • ???. (no date) ??????(???).
  • ??. (no date) ??????(?????).
  • ???. (no date) ??????·?????????·????-????????????.
  • Gile, Daniel. (c2009) Basic concepts and models for interpreter and translator training, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Pub. Co. vol. v. 8

The above list is indicative of the essential reading for the course. The library makes provision for all reading list items, with digital provision where possible, and these resources are shared between students. Further reading can be obtained from this module's reading list.

Assessment items, weightings and deadlines

Coursework / exam Description Deadline Weighting
Coursework Simultaneous Interpreting Test 100%

Overall assessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%

Reassessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%
Module supervisor and teaching staff
Ms Nan Zhao
Dr Nan Zhao, 4.121, 01206 872830, nzhaoa@essex.ac.uk Telephone: 01206 872830 Email: nzhaoa@essex.ac.uk

 

Availability
No
No
No

External examiner

Dr Yukteshwar Kumar
The University of Bath
Course Director
Resources
Available via Moodle
Of 34 hours, 0 (0%) hours available to students:
34 hours not recorded due to service coverage or fault;
0 hours not recorded due to opt-out by lecturer(s).

 

Further information
Language and Linguistics

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