IA101-3-FY-CO:
Introduction to the History of Art in Western Europe: From Classical Greece to Impressionist France

PLEASE NOTE: This module is inactive. Visit the Module Directory to view modules and variants offered during the current academic year.

The details
2024/25
Essex Pathways
Colchester Campus
Full Year
Foundation/Year Zero: Level 3
Inactive
Thursday 03 October 2024
Friday 27 June 2025
30
11 May 2023

 

Requisites for this module
(none)
(none)
(none)
(none)

 

(none)

Key module for

BA VV38 Art History and History (Including Foundation Year),
BA VV3B Art History and History (Including Foundation Year and Year Abroad),
BA V3RB Art History and Modern Languages (Including Foundation Year and Year Abroad),
BA VR3B Art History with Modern Languages (Including Foundation Year and Year Abroad),
BA T728 English and United States Literature (Including Foundation Year),
BA VW38 Film Studies and Art History (Including Foundation Year),
BA VW3B Film Studies and Art History (Including Foundation Year and Year Abroad),
BA QV2H Literature and Art History (Including Foundation Year),
BA QV3B Literature and Art History (Including Foundation Year and Year Abroad),
BA VV54 Philosophy and Art History (Including Foundation Year),
BA VVHP Philosophy and Art History (Including Foundation Year and Year Abroad)

Module description

This module is designed as an introduction to the history of painting, sculpture and architecture in Western Europe. At the same time it will introduce students to a broad range of interpretations, theories and accounts of the way people think about art.


The module is a general survey of art history in Western Europe, from the 4th century BC to the beginning of 20th century AD. As this is a very large time span, the module will focus on certain key concepts. Beginning with Greek civilization, which laid the foundations of our ideas of western art, the module will end with the revolutions in France which changed the way we look at art today.

Module aims

The aims of this module are:



  • To introduce students to the academic discipline of Art History and Theory.

  • To introduce students the idea of looking at, critically analysing and discussing works of art.

  • To familiarise students with the major stylistic terms in art history.

  • To familiarise students with the various terms used when discussing works of art (e.g. fresco, engraving, perspective, chiaroscuro, etching, the orders, nave aisles, choir, rood-screen)

Module learning outcomes

By the end of this module, students will be expected to be able to demonstrate:



  1. An ability to look at, critically analyse and discuss specific works of art.

  2. An understanding of the major stylistic periods in Art History (e.g. Classical, Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, Mannerist, Baroque, Neo Classical, Romantic, etc.), their chronology and the different ideas related to each period.

  3. An ability to use art historical terms accurately and appropriately

  4. A familiarity with the key myths and stories, both pagan and Christian, which appear in western art.

  5. Engage fully with the study of art history through the taking of lecture notes, participation in class discussion and the undertaking of independent study.

  6. Analyse assignment questions, and research and construct a response using appropriate terminology, and in suitably academic register.

  7. Analyse take-home exam questions and formulate an appropriate response using appropriate terminology, and in suitably academic register.

  8. Articulate independent opinions and judgements on the works being studied in order to present information to a wider audience.

  9. Reference all reading sources correctly, and to construct an accompanying bibliography.


Skills for your professional life (Transferable Skills)


By the end of this module, students will have practised the following:



  1. Observational skills through using visual clues to help identify salient characteristics of buildings and artwork, or indeed the work of an individual artist.

  2. Discussion and oral presentation skills through class activities and mini-presentations. It is hoped that students will benefit in confidence by participation, as well as honing their ability to communicate their ideas effectively for an audience.

  3. Written skills: students are asked to engage with note-taking activities as well as prepare two written assignments.

  4. Time management: students are expected to engage with weekly tasks and assignment deadlines.

  5. IT skills: students are expected to use Moodle to access the slides and other information and materials for the course.

Module information

Syllabus


Ancient Greece: The Classical Ideal, the development and change of the ideal and the spread of classicism throughout the Roman Empire in Western Europe.
Reading: Gombrich, E.H. The Story of Art, pp 75-124


Heavenly aspirations: Gothic Spiritualism in France and England.
Reading: Gombrich, E.H. The Story of Art, pp171-221


Man is the Measure of all things: Renaissance Humanism in Tuscany and the Netherlands.
Reading: Gombrich, E.H. The Story of Art, pp 223-243,247-252,287-323.


The City of Light and Colour: Venice.
Reading: Gombrich, E.H. The Story of Art, pp 325-339


The Fantasy and Power of the Baroque versus Dutch Reality: Italy, France and Holland.
Reading: Gombrich, E.H. The Story of Art, pp 387-403, 436-440 (The Baroque), 413-433 (Dutch Reality)


Enlightenment and Reason: The Rise of the Academy, France and England
Reading: Gombrich, E.H. The Story of Art, pp 454-473


Revolution, Scandal and Change: A New Way Forward? England and France
Reading: Gombrich, E.H. The Story of Art, pp 499-527

Learning and teaching methods

This module will be delivered weekly via:

  • One 1-hour lecture, followed by a 1-hour post-lecture discussion
  • One 2-hour class

Teaching and learning on Essex Pathways modules offers students the ability to develop the foundation knowledge, skills, and competences to study at undergraduate level, through a curriculum that is purposely designed to provide an exceptional learning experience. All teaching, learning and assessment materials will be available via Moodle in a consistent and user-friendly manner.

The class is always illustrated by slides. Students are encouraged to talk, ask questions and contribute to a general discussion. Students will regularly be asked to make mini-presentations of their own on topics which relate to the era being studied. The University of Essex is close to the countryside painted by the famous English painter, John Constable, and is ideally placed for students to take advantage of the world-class London galleries and museums.

Learning support

Access to all materials including slides and notes is provided via Moodle. Students will be directed to additional reading resources via the Moodle Reading List. Relevant documentaries on Art History are available via BOB Learning On Screen. We also make use of virtual tours of major galleries including the National Gallery, London. Students are offered one to one tutorials to support their preparation for assignments and to discuss feedback.

Bibliography*

This module does not appear to have a published bibliography.

Assessment items, weightings and deadlines

Coursework / exam Description Deadline Coursework weighting
Exam  Main exam: In-Person, Open Book (Restricted), 180 minutes during Summer (Main Period) 
Exam  Reassessment Main exam: In-Person, Open Book (Restricted), 180 minutes during September (Reassessment Period) 

Additional coursework information

Formative assessment

In groups, students will be asked to prepare a short informal presentation on selected slides over the period of the Autumn Term, to be shared with the class.

Summative assessment

A 5-10 minute slide presentation – students will be asked to prepare a presentation based on the works of art studied in the Autumn Term.

A 1,500-word project - students are asked to prepare an essay on any artist whose work they have studied in the Spring Term. This is accompanied by a visual component in the form of a set of slides which should illustrate aspects of the chosen artist’s work.

A 3-hour in-person, open book (restricted) exam - the examination will be open-book and in person, and the students will be expected to answer three questions.

Reassessment strategy

Failed exam - Resit the exam which is re-aggregated with existing coursework mark to create a new module mark.

Failed coursework - Resubmit a piece of coursework (1,500 words) which is re-aggregated with existing exam mark to create a new module mark. The reassessment task will replace the coursework component and will enable the relevant learning outcomes to be met.

Failed exam and coursework - Resit the exam and resubmit one piece of coursework (1,500 words) to be aggregated to create a new module mark.

Exam format definitions

  • Remote, open book: Your exam will take place remotely via an online learning platform. You may refer to any physical or electronic materials during the exam.
  • In-person, open book: Your exam will take place on campus under invigilation. You may refer to any physical materials such as paper study notes or a textbook during the exam. Electronic devices may not be used in the exam.
  • In-person, open book (restricted): The exam will take place on campus under invigilation. You may refer only to specific physical materials such as a named textbook during the exam. Permitted materials will be specified by your department. Electronic devices may not be used in the exam.
  • In-person, closed book: The exam will take place on campus under invigilation. You may not refer to any physical materials or electronic devices during the exam. There may be times when a paper dictionary, for example, may be permitted in an otherwise closed book exam. Any exceptions will be specified by your department.

Your department will provide further guidance before your exams.

Overall assessment

Coursework Exam
60% 40%

Reassessment

Coursework Exam
60% 40%
Module supervisor and teaching staff
Mrs Mandy Bannerman, email: mbanner@essex.ac.uk.
Mandy Bannerman
Becky Humphreys (becky.humphreys@essex.ac.uk or 01206 872217)

 

Availability
No
No
No

External examiner

Ms Linda Hurley
University of Southampton
Senior Teaching Fellow
Resources
Available via Moodle
Of 132 hours, 0 (0%) hours available to students:
132 hours not recorded due to service coverage or fault;
0 hours not recorded due to opt-out by lecturer(s).

 

Further information
Essex Pathways

* Please note: due to differing publication schedules, items marked with an asterisk (*) base their information upon the previous academic year.

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