GV537-6-FY-CO:
Development, State Building and Conflict

The details
2019/20
Government
Colchester Campus
Full Year
Undergraduate: Level 6
Current
Thursday 03 October 2019
Friday 26 June 2020
30
19 August 2019

 

Requisites for this module
(none)
(none)
(none)
(none)

 

(none)

Key module for

(none)

Module description

This module examines the interplay between state fragility, political and economic development, state building, and conflict. The first part of the module explores how state capacity and processes of state formation influence the risk of conflict. The second part examines how conflict, violence, and third-party intervention influence post-conflict state-building, development, and broader peace-building processes.

The topics covered in this module include (but are not limited to): the relationship between state capacity and conflict, the political dimensions of state fragility and their effect on civil war and terrorism, the causes and consequences of the "resource curse", the effects of refugee flows and the migration-security nexus, United Nations peacekeeping, post-conflict elections and election monitoring, constitution building, democratization, and human rights.

Module aims

The aims of this module are to study the interplay between state fragility, political and economic development, state building, and conflict.

Module learning outcomes

In this module students will learn to: i) apply theoretical frameworks to understand the dynamics of some of the most conflict prone and unstable areas of the world ii) identify the challenges to post-conflict state building and assess relevant policy responses, iii) engage in a role-playing exercise by participating in a simulation involving the drafting of the constitution of a post-conflict state.

By the end of the course you should be able to:

1. Understand and assess the multiple dimensions of (in)stability and state fragility.
2. Identify and understand the interplay of economic and political drivers of conflict
3. Understand the obstacles to political development and state building in post-conflict societies.
4. Understand the significance of key concepts in conflict resolution studies and their relevance for the analysis of state building.
5. Link theory and evidence in the study of peacekeeping and peacebuilding
6. Apply theoretical frameworks to understand the dynamics of specific conflict and post-conflict states
7. Identify, describe, and critically evaluate solutions to prevent, mitigate and manage civil wars.

Module information

No additional information available.

Learning and teaching methods

The module will be taught on the basis of one two-hour seminar, sometimes divided into a lecture followed by a class, sometimes combined as a two-hour discussion with a break in the middle. Students must prepare for each class by reading the materials assigned for the week (under required readings). Attendance is mandatory. Failure to read and/or to attend will make it hard to follow the course and even harder to do well on the essays and tests.

Bibliography

  • David Roberts. (2009) 'The superficiality of statebuilding in Cambodia: Patronage and clientelism as enduring forms of politics', in The dilemmas of statebuilding: confronting the contradictions of postwar peace operations, Abingdon: Routledge., pp.149-170
  • Paul Collier; Anke Hoeffler. (2004) 'Greed and Grievance in Civil War', in Oxford Economic Papers. vol. 56 (4) , pp.563-595
  • Enterline, Andrew J.; Michael Greig, J. (2008-10) 'The History of Imposed Democracy and the Future of Iraq and Afghanistan', in Foreign Policy Analysis. vol. 4 (4) , pp.321-347
  • Karl DeRouen Jr. et al. (2010) 'Civil war peace agreement implementation and state capacity', in Journal of Peace Research: Sage Publications, Ltd. vol. 47 (3) , pp.333-346
  • Davenport, Christina; Moore, Will; Poe, Steven. (2003-01) 'Sometimes You Just Have to Leave: Domestic Threats and Forced Migration, 1964-1989', in International Interactions. vol. 29 (1) , pp.27-55
  • Miles Kahler. (2009) 'Statebuilding after Afghanistan and Iraq', in The dilemmas of statebuilding: confronting the contradictions of postwar peace operations, Abingdon: Routledge., pp.287-303
  • Reilly, Benjamin. (2002-06) 'Elections in Post-Conflict Scenarios: Constraints and Dangers', in International Peacekeeping. vol. 9 (2) , pp.118-139
  • Bakke, Kristin M.; O'Loughlin, John; Toal, Gerard; Ward, Michael D. (2014-09) 'Convincing State-Builders? Disaggregating Internal Legitimacy in Abkhazia', in International Studies Quarterly. vol. 58 (3) , pp.591-607
  • Jacob D. Kathman. (©2016) 'Ripe for Resolution: Third Party Mediation and Negotiating Peace Agreements', in What do we know about civil wars?, Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield., pp.92-100
  • Ross, Michael L. (2004-05) 'What Do We Know about Natural Resources and Civil War?', in Journal of Peace Research. vol. 41 (3) , pp.337-356
  • Susan D. Hyde. (2011) 'Catch Us If You Can: Election Monitoring and International Norm Diffusion', in American Journal of Political Science: Midwest Political Science Association. vol. 55 (2) , pp.356-369
  • Ross, Michael L. (2015-05-11) 'What Have We Learned about the Resource Curse?', in Annual Review of Political Science. vol. 18 (1) , pp.239-259
  • (no date) UNHCR Global Trends - Forced Displacement in 2017.
  • Kirsti Samuels. (2009) 'Postwar constitution building: Opportunities and challenges', in The dilemmas of statebuilding: confronting the contradictions of postwar peace operations, Abingdon: Routledge., pp.173-195
  • Bridget L. Coggins. (2015) 'Does State Failure Cause Terrorism? An Empirical Analysis (1999–2008)', in Journal of Conflict Resolution. vol. 59 (3) , pp.455-483
  • Clayton L. Thyne. (©2016) 'The Legacies of Civil War: Health, Education, and Economic Development', in What do we know about civil wars?, Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield., pp.128-140
  • J. Michael Grieg; Paul F. Diehl. (2004) 'The Peacekeeping-Peacemaking Dilemma', in International Studies Quarterly. vol. 49 (4) , pp.621-645
  • Matthew C. Wilson; James A. Piazza. (2013) 'Autocracies and Terrorism: Conditioning Effects of Authoritarian Regime Type on Terrorist Attacks', in American Journal of Political Science. vol. 57 (4) , pp.941-955
  • Timothy D. Sisk. (2009) 'Pathways of the political: Electoral processes after civil war', in The dilemmas of statebuilding: confronting the contradictions of postwar peace operations, Abingdon: Routledge., pp.196-224
  • Kathleen Gallagher Cunningham. (©2014) Inside the politics of self-determination, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Idean Salehyan; Kristian Skrede Gleditsch. (2006) 'Refugees and the Spread of Civil War', in International Organization: Cambridge University Press. vol. 60 (2) , pp.335-366
  • Lars-Erik Cederman; Kristian Skrede Gleditsch; Halvard Buhaug. (2013) Inequality, grievances, and civil war, New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Virginia Page Fortna. (2004) 'Does Peacekeeping Keep Peace? International Intervention and the Duration of Peace after Civil War', in International Studies Quarterly: Wiley. vol. 48 (2) , pp.269-292
  • (©2016) What do we know about civil wars?, Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield.
  • Christopher Blattman. (2009) 'From Violence to Voting: War and Political Participation in Uganda', in American Political Science Review. vol. 103 (2) , pp.231-247
  • Rüegger, Seraina. (2019-01) 'Refugees, ethnic power relations, and civil conflict in the country of asylum', in Journal of Peace Research. vol. 56 (1) , pp.42-57
  • Roland Paris; Timothy D. Sisk. (2009) The dilemmas of statebuilding: confronting the contradictions of postwar peace operations, Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Flores, Thomas Edward; Nooruddin, Irfan. (2012-04) 'The Effect of Elections on Postconflict Peace and Reconstruction', in The Journal of Politics. vol. 74 (2) , pp.558-570
  • Hendrix, Cullen S.; Young, Joseph K. (2014-04-03) 'State Capacity and Terrorism: A Two-Dimensional Approach', in Security Studies. vol. 23 (2) , pp.329-363
  • Will H. Moore; Stephen M. Shellman. (2004) 'Fear of Persecution: Forced Migration, 1952-1995', in Journal of Conflict Resolution. vol. 48 (5) , pp.723-745
  • Milton, Daniel; Spencer, Megan; Findley, Michael. (2013-11) 'Radicalism of the Hopeless: Refugee Flows and Transnational Terrorism', in International Interactions. vol. 39 (5) , pp.621-645
  • Virginia Page Fortna; Reyko Huang. (2012) 'Democratization after Civil War: A Brush-Clearing Exercise', in International Studies Quarterly: Wiley. vol. 56 (4) , pp.801-808
  • The Four Things We Know About How Civil Wars End (and What This Tells Us About Syria) – Political Violence at a Glance, http://politicalviolenceataglance.org/2013/10/18/the-four-things-we-know-about-how-civil-wars-end-and-what-this-tells-us-about-syria/
  • (no date) Links between Terrorism and Migration: An Exploration.
  • Gaibulloev, Khusrav; Piazza, James A.; Sandler, Todd. (2017) 'Regime Types and Terrorism', in International Organization. vol. 71 (3) , pp.491-522
  • Fragile States Index | The Fund for Peace, https://fragilestatesindex.org/
  • Burcu Savun; Christian Gineste. (2019) 'From protection to persecution: Threat environment and refugee scapegoating', in Journal of Peace Research. vol. 56 (1) , pp.88-102
  • Costalli, Stefano; Ruggeri, Andrea. (2015-01) 'Forging political entrepreneurs: Civil war effects on post-conflict politics in Italy', in Political Geography. vol. 44, pp.40-49
  • Paul F. Diehl. (©2016) 'Breaking the Conflict Trap: The Impact of Peacekeeping on Violence and Democratization in the Post-Conflict Context', in What do we know about civil wars?, Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield., pp.113-125
  • Benjamin Smith. (©2016) 'Exploring the Resource-Civil War Nexus', in What do we know about civil wars?, Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield., pp.166-176
  • James A. Piazza. (2008) 'Incubators of Terror: Do Failed and Failing States Promote Transnational Terrorism?', in International Studies Quarterly: Wiley. vol. 52 (3) , pp.469-488
  • Caroline A. Hartzell. (©2016) 'Negotiated Peace: Power Sharing in Peace Agreements', in What do we know about civil wars?, Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield., pp.101-112
  • Aksoy, Deniz; Carter, David B.; Wright, Joseph. (2012-07) 'Terrorism In Dictatorships', in The Journal of Politics. vol. 74 (3) , pp.810-826
  • States of Fragility Reports - OECD, http://www.oecd.org/dac/conflict-fragility-resilience/listofstateoffragilityreports.htm
  • James D. Fearon; David D. Laitin. (2003) 'Ethnicity, Insurgency and Civil War', in American Political Science Review. vol. 97 (1) , pp.75-90
  • Cullen S. Hendrix. (2010) 'Measuring state capacity: Theoretical and empirical implications for the study of civil conflict', in Journal of Peace Research. vol. 47 (3) , pp.273-285

The above list is indicative of the essential reading for the course. The library makes provision for all reading list items, with digital provision where possible, and these resources are shared between students. Further reading can be obtained from this module's reading list.

Assessment items, weightings and deadlines

Coursework / exam Description Deadline Weighting
Coursework Essay 1 25/11/2019 30%
Coursework Essay 2 09/03/2020 30%
Practical In-class test 1 20%
Practical In-class test 2 20%

Overall assessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%

Reassessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%
Module supervisor and teaching staff
Dr Sara Polo
Dr Sara Polo email sara.polo@essex.ac.uk Module Administrator: Sallyann West, govquery@essex.ac.uk

 

Availability
Yes
Yes
Yes

External examiner

Dr Arzu Kibris
Associate Professor
Resources
Available via Moodle
Of 39 hours, 39 (100%) hours available to students:
0 hours not recorded due to service coverage or fault;
0 hours not recorded due to opt-out by lecturer(s).

 

Further information
Government

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