GV300-6-AU-CO:
Quantitative Political Analysis

The details
2019/20
Government
Colchester Campus
Autumn
Undergraduate: Level 6
Current
Thursday 03 October 2019
Saturday 14 December 2019
15
19 June 2019

 

Requisites for this module
(none)
(none)
(none)
(none)

 

(none)

Key module for

BA LL12 Economics and Politics,
BA LL13 Economics and Politics (Including Placement Year),
BA LL1F Economics and Politics (Including Year Abroad),
BSC LL2F Economics and Politics,
BSC LL3F Economics and Politics (Including Year Abroad),
BSC LL4F Economics and Politics (Including Placement Year)

Module description

Students in the Government Department will be expected to participate in the Capstone Project, an opportunity to conduct their own independent research. The word count for the project should be between 9,000-10,000 words inclusive of notes and bibliography. Students can work in pairs for the final project to promote team building and mutual learning, but the project must in that case be 12,000 words.

Module aims

The aims of the module are to endow students with the skills necessary for putting together a well-written, well-researched dissertation and to provide them with in-depth knowledge in a specific area of research of their choosing.

Module learning outcomes

By the end of this module, students will have:
-Understood how to take initiative in developing a research project;
-Gained self-discipline in setting deadlines and adhering to them;
-Acquired in-depth knowledge in a subject matter that they are interested in.

Module information

No additional information available.

Learning and teaching methods

1 x 1 hour lecture

Bibliography

  • Blair, Graeme; Imai, Kosuke; Lyall, Jason. (2014) 'Comparing and Combining List and Endorsement Experiments: Evidence from Afghanistan', in American Journal of Political Science. vol. 58 (4) , pp.1043-1063
  • Pettersson-Lidbom, Per. (2008) 'Do Parties Matter for Economic Outcomes? A Regression-Discontinuity Approach', in Journal of the European Economic Association. vol. 6 (5) , pp.1037-1056
  • (c1993) 'On behalf of an experimental political science', in Experimental foundations of political science, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. vol. Michigan studies in political analysis
  • Lazer, D. (2014) The Parable of Google Flu: Traps in Big Data Analysis.
  • Morton, Rebecca B.; Williams, Kenneth C. (2010) Experimental political science and the study of causality: from nature to the lab, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wooldridge, Jeffrey M. (©2020) Introductory econometrics: a modern approach, Boston, MA: Cengage.
  • Gill, Jeff. (2006) Essential mathematics for political and social research, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. vol. Analytical methods for social research
  • Angrist, Joshua David; Pischke, Jorn-Steffen. (2014) Mastering 'Metrics, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.
  • Ludwig, Jens; Miller, Douglas L. (2007) 'Does Head Start Improve Children's Life Chances? Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design', in The Quarterly Journal of Economics. vol. 122 (1) , pp.159-208
  • Nickerson, David W. (2008) 'Is Voting Contagious? Evidence from Two Field Experiments', in The American Political Science Review. vol. 102 (1) , pp.49-57
  • Chen, Min; Mao, Shiwen; Zhang, Yin; Leung, Victor Chung Ming. (2014) Big data: related technologies, challenges and future prospects, Cham: Springer. vol. SpringerBriefs in computer science
  • Kellstedt, Paul M.; Whitten, Guy D. (2013) The fundamentals of political science research, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Gerber, Alan S.; Green, Donald P. (©2012) Field experiments: design, analysis, and interpretation, New York: W.W. Norton.
  • Kellstedt, Paul M.; Whitten, Guy D. (2018) The fundamentals of political science research, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wooldridge, Jeffrey M. (2018) Introductory econometrics: a modern approach, Boston, MA: Cengage.
  • Gelman, Andrew; Hill, Jennifer. (2007) Data analysis using regression and multilevel/hierarchical models, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. vol. Analytical methods for social research
  • Miguel, Edward; Satyanath, Shanker; Sergenti, Ernest. (2004-08) 'Economic Shocks and Civil Conflict: An Instrumental Variables Approach', in Journal of Political Economy. vol. 112 (4) , pp.725-753
  • Morgan, Stephen L.; Winship, Christopher. (2015) Counterfactuals and causal inference: methods and principles for social research, New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. vol. Analytical methods for social research
  • Kellstedt, Paul M.; Whitten, Guy D. (2018) The fundamentals of political science research, New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Wooldridge, Jeffrey M. (2014) Introduction to econometrics, Andover: Cengage Learning.
  • Gaines, Brian J.; Kuklinski, James H.; Quirk, Paul J. (2007) 'The Logic of the Survey Experiment Reexamined', in Political Analysis. vol. 15 (01) , pp.1-20

The above list is indicative of the essential reading for the course. The library makes provision for all reading list items, with digital provision where possible, and these resources are shared between students. Further reading can be obtained from this module's reading list.

Assessment items, weightings and deadlines

Coursework / exam Description Deadline Weighting
Coursework Problem Set 1 23/10/2019
Coursework Problem Set 2 06/11/2019
Coursework Problem Set 3 20/11/2019
Coursework Problem Set 4 04/12/2019
Practical Mid-Term Test 33.3%
Exam 180 minutes during Summer (Main Period) (Main)

Overall assessment

Coursework Exam
60% 40%

Reassessment

Coursework Exam
60% 40%
Module supervisor and teaching staff
Dr Duell email dd16751@essex.ac.uk

 

Availability
No
No
No

External examiner

Dr Mohammed Rodwan Abouharb
Resources
Available via Moodle
Of 66 hours, 18 (27.3%) hours available to students:
48 hours not recorded due to service coverage or fault;
0 hours not recorded due to opt-out by lecturer(s).

 

Further information
Government

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