CS102-4-FY-CO:
Europe: Myth and Idea

The details
2019/20
Interdisciplinary Studies Centre (ISC)
Colchester Campus
Full Year
Undergraduate: Level 4
Current
Thursday 03 October 2019
Friday 26 June 2020
30
24 May 2019

 

Requisites for this module
(none)
(none)
(none)
(none)

 

(none)

Key module for

BA R000 European Studies (Including Year Abroad),
BA R001 European Studies,
BA R002 European Studies (Including Placement Year),
BA R008 European Studies (Including Foundation Year),
BA R9T8 European Studies and Modern Languages (Including Foundation Year),
BA R9T9 European Studies and Modern Languages,
BA R9R1 European Studies with French,
BA R9R8 European Studies with French (Including Foundation Year),
BA R9R2 European Studies with German,
BA R9R6 European Studies with German (Including Foundation Year),
BA R9R3 European Studies with Italian,
BA R9R7 European Studies with Italian (Including Foundation Year),
BA R9L2 European Studies with Politics,
BA R9L8 European Studies with Politics (Including Foundation Year),
BA R9L8JS European Studies with Politics (Including Foundation Year),
BA R9R4 European Studies with Spanish,
BA R9R9 European Studies with Spanish (Including Foundation Year)

Module description

This module examines the idea, and the myth, of Europe from a number of different perspectives. It is an interdisciplinary module that ranges across the boundaries of the humanities and social sciences. The module explores how religion, politics, law, art and literature, amongst other things, have all contributed to the making of European identities. It investigates the ways in which Europeans have interacted with the rest of the world and how this has shaped Europeans' views of themselves and of others.

The module includes a number of different approaches and does not limit itself to a Eurocentric perspective. It considers how Europe has been viewed from afar, as well as the viewpoints of those who are in Europe but who do not identify with, or who feel excluded from, a European identity. The topics are approached in a broadly chronological manner. However, the module is not a history of Europe and nor is it a survey. It does not aim to be comprehensive. Rather, it examines its subject by focusing on a number of case studies. Throughout the module, there is an emphasis on cultural continuity, as well as disjuncture; on the history and genealogy of ideas, and on the evolution of prevailing myths. The material is approached in an interdisciplinary manner, drawing on the expertise of a range of staff and utilising the diversity of knowledge and experience that may be contributed to classes by students.

Module aims

This module aims to: Provide students with an understanding of some of the factors that have contributed to the formation of European identities. Introduce students to a range of scholarly materials and interdisciplinary approaches. Foster an interdisciplinary approach to the study of Europe.

Module learning outcomes

By the end of this module, students should have: A good understanding of the topics and ideas that are covered in the module. Confidence in using a number of specialised terms and terminology. The ability to distinguish elements of continuity and disjuncture in the cultures of Europe across a period of time. A notion of how texts, films, art objects, and buildings might contribute both to the formation of European identities and to our understanding of them. An understanding of how historical events and processes might bear upon the wider context of the study of Europe. Some experience of the analysis of texts, historical sources, and works of art. The ability to discuss the material covered on the module and to demonstrate this competence through coursework, seminar discussion and examination.

Module information

To prepare for this module, suggested introductory reading:

Brose, Eric Dorn (2005) A History of Europe in the Twentieth Century (New York: Oxford University Press)

Learning and teaching methods

The module consists of a weekly lecture, and a weekly seminar.

Bibliography*

  • Hobsbawm, E. J. (2003) The age of revolution: Europe, 1789-1848, London: Abacus.
  • Walters, William. (2009) 'Europe's Borders', in The SAGE handbook of European studies, London: Sage.
  • Fornäs, Johan. (2012) Signifying Europe, Bristol: Intellect.
  • Brotton, Jerry. (2013) A history of the world in twelve maps, London: Penguin Books.
  • Anderson, Benedict R. O'G. (1991) Imagined communities: reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism, London: Verso.
  • Gilbert, Helen. (2001) Postcolonial plays: an anthology, London: Routledge.
  • Walcott, Derek. (c1980) Remembrance & Pantomime: two plays, New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux.
  • Pagden, Anthony. (2002) 'Europe: Conceptualising a Continent', in The idea of Europe: from antiquity to the European Union, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Dyer, Richard. (2002) The matter of images: essays on representations, London: Routledge.
  • Joppke, Christian. (2005) 'Exclusion in the Liberal State: The Case of Immigration and Citizenship Policy', in European Journal of Social Theory. vol. 8 (1) , pp.43-61
  • Sorlin, Pierre. (1998) 'The cinema: American weapon for the Cold War', in Film History. vol. 10 (3) , pp.375-381
  • Fligstein, Neil. (2008) Euroclash: the EU, European identity, and the future of Europe, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • De Grand, Alexander J. (2004) Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany: the "fascist" style of rule, London: Routledge.
  • McCormick, John. (2017) Understanding the European Union: a concise introduction, London: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Woods, Lorna; Watson, Philippa; Costa, Marios. (2017) Steiner & Woods EU Law, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Kelley, Sean. (2013) 'Scrambling for Slaves: Captive Sales in Colonial South Carolina.', in Slavery & Abolition. vol. 34 (1) , pp.1-21
  • Césaire, Aimé; Kelley, Robin D. G. (c2000) Discourse on colonialism, New York: Monthly Review Press.
  • Jürgen Habermas: Democracy, Solidarity and the European Crisis – Pro Europa, https://www.pro-europa.eu/europe/309/jurgen-habermas-democracy-solidarity-and-the-european-crisis/
  • Hix, Simon; Hoyland, Bjorn. (2011) The political system of the European Union, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Dehousse, Renaud. (2000) 'Integration Through Law Revisited: Some Thoughts on the Juridification of the European Political Process', in The Europeanisation of law: the legal effects of European integration, Oxford: Hart.

The above list is indicative of the essential reading for the course. The library makes provision for all reading list items, with digital provision where possible, and these resources are shared between students. Further reading can be obtained from this module's reading list.

Assessment items, weightings and deadlines

Coursework / exam Description Deadline Weighting
Coursework Take Home Paper (1000 words) 20%
Coursework Assignment 1 (2000 words) (Autumn Essay) 25%
Coursework Assignment 2 (2000 words) (Spring Essay) 25%
Practical Group Presentation (Summer Term) 30%

Overall assessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%

Reassessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%
Module supervisor and teaching staff
A range of staff from across the university will contribute to the module.
Interdisciplinary Studies Centre General Office - 6.130; Email: istudies@essex.ac.uk.

 

Availability
Yes
Yes
No

External examiner

Dr James Scorer
Senior Lecturer in Latin American Cultural Studies
Resources
Available via Moodle
Of 43 hours, 42 (97.7%) hours available to students:
1 hours not recorded due to service coverage or fault;
0 hours not recorded due to opt-out by lecturer(s).

 

Further information

* Please note: due to differing publication schedules, items marked with an asterisk (*) base their information upon the previous academic year.

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