BE437-6-AP-CO:
Management, Innovation and New Technology

The details
2019/20
Essex Business School
Colchester Campus
Autumn & Spring
Undergraduate: Level 6
Current
Thursday 03 October 2019
Friday 20 March 2020
15
11 November 2019

 

Requisites for this module
(none)
(none)
(none)
(none)

 

(none)

Key module for

BSC NN25JS Management and Marketing

Module description

This module draws on lectures, case studies and readings of seminal texts to explore a range of perspectives on technology organization and society.

Module aims

The module has been designed to:
• Facilitate student understandings of the theory and practice of innovation and technological change.
• Situate innovation and technological change within a wider socio-economic and historical frameworks
• Develop reasoning skills applicable to the analysis of innovation and technological problems and opportunities.
• Develop student capacity for using empirical evidence to support complex analyses and positions

Module learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:

• Understand the theory and practice of innovation and technological change.
• Develop, through discussion and debate, reasoning skills applicable to a range of technological issues in organisations.
• Critically analyse both academic theories and dominant managerial practices of innovation and technological change.

Module information

Transferable Skills
1. Develop your ability to present complex arguments in written work
2. Develop research skills and use of evidence
3. Develop critical analytical thinking
4. Access and make active use of online source materials

Learning and teaching methods

A weekly 2 hour lecture is combined with student participation and analysis of source material. Assessment: 100% coursework Coursework : Two separate essay assignments. Coursework 1 has a maximum wordcount of 1500 words and comprises 30% of the overall mark. Coursework 2 has a maximum of 2500 words and comprises 70 % of the overall mark. Essay titles and essay planning sessions will be confirmed early in the module.

Bibliography

  • Hippel, Eric von. (c2005) Democratizing innovation, Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.
  • Quinn, James Brian. (c1992) Intelligent enterprise: a knowledge and service based paradigm for industry, New York: Free Press.
  • Warhurst, C.; Thompson, P. (2000) ''Hands, Hearts and minds: changing work and workers at the end of the century' in vol. 4', in Technology, organizations, and innovation: critical perspectives on business and management, London: Routledge., pp.1956-1982
  • Tomaney, J. (1994) '‘A new paradigm of work organization and technology?’ in Post-Fordism: a reader', in Post-Fordism: a reader, Oxford: Blackwell. vol. Studies in urban and social change
  • Graham Sewell and Barry Wilkinson. (1992) ''SOMEONE TO WATCH OVER ME': SURVEILLANCE, DISCIPLINE AND THE JUST-IN-TIME LABOUR PROCESS', in Sociology. vol. 26 (2) , pp.271-289
  • Sabel, C. (1994) '‘Flexible specialisation and the re-emergence of regional economies’ in Post-Fordism: a reader', in Post-Fordism: a reader, Oxford: Blackwell. vol. Studies in urban and social change
  • Smith, C.; Valsecchi, R.; Mueller, F.; Gabe, J. (2008) 'Knowledge and the discourse of labour process transformation: nurses and the case of NHS Direct for England', in Work, Employment & Society. vol. 22 (4) , pp.581-599
  • Mcloughlin, I.; Dawson, P.; Preece, D. (2000) '‘Introduction: Theories, concepts and paradigms’ in vol. 2', in Technology, organizations, and innovation: critical perspectives on business and management, London: Routledge.
  • Zuboff, Shoshana. (2015) 'Big other: surveillance capitalism and the prospects of an information civilization', in Journal of Information Technology. vol. 30 (1) , pp.75-89
  • Noble, David F. (2001) Digital diploma mills: the automation of higher education, New York: Monthly Review Press.
  • McLoughlin, Ian. (1999) Creative technological change: the shaping of technology and organisations, London: Routledge. vol. The management of technology and innovation
  • Winner, L. (c1999) 'Do artifacts have politics?', in The social shaping of technology, Buckingham: Open University Press.
  • Shenhav, Yehouda A. (1999) Manufacturing rationality: the engineering foundations of the managerial revolution, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Piore, Michael J.; Sabel, Charles F. (c1984) The second industrial divide: possibilities for prosperity, New York: Basic Books.
  • Noble, David F. (c1995) Progress without people: new technology, unemployment, and the message of resistance, Toronto: Between the Lines.
  • David F. Noble. (1998) 'Digital diploma mills: The automation of higher education', in First Monday: Valauskas, Edward J. vol. 3 (1)
  • Rhodes, Ed; Wield, David. (1994) 'Technology, innovation theory and the implementation process', in Implementing new technologies: innovation and the management of technology, Oxford: NCC Blackwell., pp.79-95
  • Wajcman, Judy. (2004) TechnoFeminism, Cambridge: Polity Press.
  • Abigail Marks, Dora Scholarios. (2007) 'Revisiting technical workers: professional and organisational identities in the software industry.', in New Technology, Work & Employment. vol. 22 (2) , pp.98-117
  • Snow, C. C.; Coleman, H. J.; Miles, R. E. (2000) '‘Managing 21st Century Network Organizations’ in vol. 4', in Technology, organizations, and innovation: critical perspectives on business and management, London: Routledge., pp.1621-1638
  • Harris, M. (1998) '‘Rethinking the virtual organization’ in Teleworking: international perspectives : from telecommuting to the virtual organisation', in Teleworking: international perspectives ; from telecommuting to the virtual organisation, London: Routledge., pp.74-92
  • Child, J. (2000) '‘Managerial strategies, new technology and the labour process’ in vol. 2', in Technology, organizations, and innovation: critical perspectives on business and management, London: Routledge., pp.453-486
  • Webster, Frank. (2014) Theories of the information society, Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Beniger, James R. (1986) The control revolution: technological and economic origins of the information society, Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.
  • Rangarath-Nayak, P.; Ketteringham, J. (2004) '‘3M’s Post-It Notes: A managed or accidental innovation?’ in The human side of managing technological innovation: a collection of readings', in The human side of managing technological innovation: a collection of readings, New York: Oxford University Press., pp.425-435
  • Castells, M. (2000) ''The network enterprise: the culture, institutions and organizations of the informational economy' in vol. 4', in Technology, organizations, and innovation: critical perspectives on business and management, London: Routledge., pp.1571-1620
  • Noble, D. (2001) '‘Present tense technology’ in vol. 4', in Organizational studies: critical perspectives on business and management, London: Routledge. vol. Critical perspectives on business and management, pp.1873-1897
  • Newell, Susan. (c2009) Managing knowledge work and innovation, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • McLoughlin, Ian. (1999) Creative technological change: the shaping of technology and organisations, London: Routledge.
  • S. Ackroyd, G. Burrell, M. Hughes, A. Whitaker. (1989) 'The Japanisation of British industry?', in Industrial Relations Journal. vol. 19 (1) , pp.11-23
  • Zuboff, Shoshana. (2018) The age of surveillance capitalism: the fight for a human future at the new frontier of power, New York: PublicAffairs.
  • McLoughlin, Ian. (1999) Creative technological change: the shaping of technology and organisations, London: Routledge. vol. Management of technology and innovation
  • Morath, F. A.; Schmidt, A. P. (2000) ''Management of knowledge as interface management: from exo- worlds to endo-worlds' in vol. 4 of', in Technology, organizations, and innovation: critical perspectives on business and management, London: Routledge., pp.1682-1694
  • Badham, R.; Matthews, J. (2000) '‘The new production systems debate’ in vol. 2', in Technology, organizations, and innovation: critical perspectives on business and management, London: Routledge., pp.957-1014
  • Cowan, R.S. (1985) 'How the refrigerator got its hum', in The social shaping of technology, Milton Keynes: Open University Press.
  • Harris, Martin. (2006-02) 'F. W. Taylor and the legacies of systemization', in Information, Communication & Society. vol. 9 (1) , pp.109-120
  • Barrett, Rowena. (2005) Management, labour process and software development: reality bytes, London: Routledge. vol. Routledge research in employment relations
  • Orlikowski, W. (2000) ''The duality of technology: rethinking the concept of technology in organizations' in vol. 2', in Technology, organizations, and innovation: critical perspectives on business and management, London: Routledge., pp.749-788
  • Terry Wallace. (2008) 'Cycles of production: from assembly lines to cells to assembly lines in the Volvo Cab Plant.', in New Technology, Work & Employment. vol. 23 (1) , pp.111-124
  • Zuboff, S. (2000) '‘The limits of hierarchy in an informated organization’ in vol. 2', in Technology, organizations, and innovation: critical perspectives on business and management, London: Routledge., pp.655-678
  • Barrett, Rowena. (2001) 'Labouring under an illusion? The labour process of software development in the Australian information industry', in New Technology, Work & Employment. vol. 16 (1) , pp.18-34
  • Rowena Barrett. (2004) 'Working at Webboyz: An Analysis of Control over the Software Development Labour Process', in Sociology. vol. 38 (4) , pp.777-794
  • Buchanan, David A.; Huczynski, Andrzej. (2017) Organizational behaviour, Harlow: Pearson.

The above list is indicative of the essential reading for the course. The library makes provision for all reading list items, with digital provision where possible, and these resources are shared between students. Further reading can be obtained from this module's reading list.

Overall assessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%

Reassessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%
Module supervisor and teaching staff
Martin Harris
ebsugcol@essex.ac.uk

 

Availability
No
No
No

External examiner

Dr Matthew Higgins
The University of Leicester
Associate Professor in Marketing and Consumption
Resources
Available via Moodle
No lecture recording information available for this module.

 

Further information
Essex Business School

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