SE788-7-AU-CO:
Neuromechanical basis of strength and conditioning

The details
2023/24
Sport, Rehabilitation and Exercise Sciences (School of)
Colchester Campus
Autumn
Postgraduate: Level 7
Current
Thursday 05 October 2023
Friday 15 December 2023
15
11 October 2023

 

Requisites for this module
(none)
(none)
(none)
(none)

 

(none)

Key module for

MSC C6S612 Strength and Conditioning,
MSC C6S624 Strength and Conditioning

Module description

Strength and conditioning coaches deal primarily with movement problems – problems that ultimately impede the expression of force.

The primary task of a strength and conditioning coach is to optimise an athlete's movement performance whilst minimising the risk of injury/pain. The art of coaching, which you will learn in other modules, must be informed by the scientific basis underpinning movement and its control.

Module aims

The aim of this module is to equip you with the theoretical and practical movement-based skills that will optimise your ability to assess, plan, and implement strength training programs to improve athletic performance.

Module learning outcomes

1. Systematic understanding of fundamental movement principles that underpins strength and conditioning assessment and training.
2. Critical understanding of movement determinants of elite sport performances
3. Critically analyse and understand the movement trade-offs between competing sporting objectives.
4. Apply movement principles towards the design and implementation of strength testing assessments.
5. Able to interpret strength testing assessments to personalise strength training programmes.
6. Apply movement principles towards the design of strength training programmes

Module information

Indicative syllabus:

Fundamental movement principles:
You will be learning 8 fundamental movement principles essential for any strength and conditioning coach

Mechanics of maximal force production:
You will be learning the neural and mechanical basis behind how force is produced in major sporting movement tasks, and the limits to maximal performance.

Mechanics of maximal force absorption:
You will be learning the neural and mechanical basis behind how energy is absorbed in major sporting movement tasks.

Mechanics of stretch-shortening cycle activities:
You will be learning the neural and mechanical basis behind how energy is conserved and amplified by the elastic “bouncing” behavior of muscles.

Field methods for mechanical athletic profiling:
You will be learning simple field-based methods, using mobile phone applications, to assess an athlete’s movement profile to inform your training design.

Interpretation of complex biomechanical data:
Biomechanical data is more complex than many other data, because it comes with a time component, and/or a distance component. You will learn how to interpret biomechanical curve data, and also interpret special statistical results unique to biomechanical data.

Training design informed by whole-body mechanics:
You will learn how training can be informed (e.g., load, rest, type) from global whole-body assessments of an athlete.

Training design informed by joint-level mechanics:
You will learn how training can be informed (e.g., load, rest, type) from local joint-level assessments of an athlete.

Building tissue resilience:
You will learn the mechanical basis underpinning injury and pain, and how you can inform your training to build tissue resilience.

Learning and teaching methods

No information available.

Bibliography

This module does not appear to have a published bibliography for this year.

Assessment items, weightings and deadlines

Coursework / exam Description Deadline Coursework weighting
Coursework   MCQ via Moodle - week 3    5% 
Coursework   MCQ via Moodle - week 4    5% 
Coursework   MCQ via Moodle - week 5    5% 
Coursework   MCQ via Moodle - week 6    5% 
Coursework   MCQ via Moodle - week 7    5% 
Coursework   MCQ via Moodle - week 8    5% 
Coursework   MCQ via Moodle - week 9    5% 
Coursework   MCQ via Moodle - week 10    5% 
Coursework   Individual Presentation - FASER submission   12/01/2024  60% 

Exam format definitions

  • Remote, open book: Your exam will take place remotely via an online learning platform. You may refer to any physical or electronic materials during the exam.
  • In-person, open book: Your exam will take place on campus under invigilation. You may refer to any physical materials such as paper study notes or a textbook during the exam. Electronic devices may not be used in the exam.
  • In-person, open book (restricted): The exam will take place on campus under invigilation. You may refer only to specific physical materials such as a named textbook during the exam. Permitted materials will be specified by your department. Electronic devices may not be used in the exam.
  • In-person, closed book: The exam will take place on campus under invigilation. You may not refer to any physical materials or electronic devices during the exam. There may be times when a paper dictionary, for example, may be permitted in an otherwise closed book exam. Any exceptions will be specified by your department.

Your department will provide further guidance before your exams.

Overall assessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%

Reassessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%
Module supervisor and teaching staff
Dr Bernard Liew, email: bl19622@essex.ac.uk.
SRES Office, email: sres (Non essex users should add @essex.ac.uk to create the full email address)

 

Availability
No
No
No

External examiner

No external examiner information available for this module.
Resources
Available via Moodle
Of 18 hours, 18 (100%) hours available to students:
0 hours not recorded due to service coverage or fault;
0 hours not recorded due to opt-out by lecturer(s), module, or event type.

 

Further information

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