LT138-4-AU-CO:
History of Journalism

The details
2023/24
Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies
Colchester Campus
Autumn
Undergraduate: Level 4
Current
Thursday 05 October 2023
Friday 15 December 2023
15
22 March 2022

 

Requisites for this module
(none)
LT144
(none)
(none)

 

LT144, LT231, LT232

Key module for

BA P500 Multimedia Journalism,
BA P501 Multimedia Journalism (Including Year Abroad),
BA P503 Multimedia Journalism (Including Placement Year),
BA P590 Journalism and Modern Languages,
BA P550 Journalism and Criminology,
BA P551 Journalism and Criminology (Including Placement Year),
BA P552 Journalism and Criminology (Including Year Abroad),
BA P540 Journalism and Sociology,
BA P541 Journalism and Sociology (Including Placement Year),
BA P542 Journalism and Sociology (Including Year Abroad),
BA P510 Journalism and English Language,
BA P511 Journalism and English Language (Including Placement Year),
BA P512 Journalism and English Language (Including Year Abroad),
BA P530 Journalism and Literature,
BA P531 Journalism and Literature (Including Placement Year),
BA P532 Journalism and Literature (Including Year Abroad),
BA P570 Journalism with Human Rights,
BA P571 Journalism with Human Rights (Including Year Abroad),
BA P572 Journalism with Human Rights (Including Placement Year),
BA P580 Journalism and Politics,
BA P581 Journalism and Politics (Including Placement Year),
BA P582 Journalism and Politics (Including Year Abroad),
BA P565 Film and Journalism,
BA P566 Film and Journalism (Including Foundation Year),
BA P567 Film and Journalism (including Placement Year),
BA P568 Film and Journalism(including Year Abroad),
BA P595 Journalism and Language Studies

Module description

This module covers the history of journalism in Britain from its beginnings in the 17th century to the start of the internet age. Topics include: the impact of printing; the first news serials; government attempts to control the press from the 17th to the 19th centuries; the emergence of mass circulation papers; the role of press barons in the 20th century; radio and the rise of the BBC; the press from 1945 to 2000; the arrival and development of television; ownership and control of the media; and the impact of the internet. The module critically considers the evolving political, economic and social contexts of journalism and the media more generally, underpinning and informing the content of all other elements of the degree course.

Module aims

The aims of the module are to:

1. give you an understanding of how British journalism got to where it is now
2. give you an understanding of the changing political and economic constraints on media freedom
3. give you a sense of how ownership and control of news media have changed over time
4. give you an introduction to interpretative controversies in media history
5. enable you to relate journalism's past to contemporary debates about its role and ethics.

Module learning outcomes

At the end of this module you will:

1. be able to place today's journalism in Britain in a historical context
2. have a good sense of how controversies over censorship, freedom of expression, media ownership and the influence of mass media on politics and society have played out in the past five centuries
3. have a working knowledge of how technological change has affected the news media over time
4. understand the origins of contemporary concerns about journalistic ethics.

Module information

Essential Reading:

Hargreaves, Ian (2014) Journalism – A Very Short Introduction, Oxford: Oxford University Press
Curran, James and Seaton, Jean (2016) Power Without Responsibility: Press, Broadcasting and the Internet in Britain, London: Routledge. EBSCOhost ebook collection.

Recommended / supplementary reading:

Marr, Andrew (2005) My Trade: A Short History of British Journalism, London: Pan Books.
Conboy, Martin and Steel, John (2014) Routledge Companion to British Media History, London: Routledge
Conboy, Martin (2004) Journalism: A Critical History, London: Sage


Learning and teaching methods

Anticipated teaching delivery: The module will be taught through a combination of lectures, discussions and practical examples and case studies. Teaching will be based on a weekly two-hour seminar, comprising a lecture and interactive discussion delivered by journalism staff, enhanced by guest lecturers as appropriate with expertise in the history and practice of journalism.

Bibliography

The above list is indicative of the essential reading for the course.
The library makes provision for all reading list items, with digital provision where possible, and these resources are shared between students.
Further reading can be obtained from this module's reading list.

Assessment items, weightings and deadlines

Coursework / exam Description Deadline Coursework weighting
Coursework   Essay (1,500 words)  10/01/2024  100% 

Exam format definitions

  • Remote, open book: Your exam will take place remotely via an online learning platform. You may refer to any physical or electronic materials during the exam.
  • In-person, open book: Your exam will take place on campus under invigilation. You may refer to any physical materials such as paper study notes or a textbook during the exam. Electronic devices may not be used in the exam.
  • In-person, open book (restricted): The exam will take place on campus under invigilation. You may refer only to specific physical materials such as a named textbook during the exam. Permitted materials will be specified by your department. Electronic devices may not be used in the exam.
  • In-person, closed book: The exam will take place on campus under invigilation. You may not refer to any physical materials or electronic devices during the exam. There may be times when a paper dictionary, for example, may be permitted in an otherwise closed book exam. Any exceptions will be specified by your department.

Your department will provide further guidance before your exams.

Overall assessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%

Reassessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%
Module supervisor and teaching staff
Mr Paul Anderson, email: paul.anderson@essex.ac.uk.
Paul Anderson
LiFTS General Office - email liftstt@essex.ac.uk. Telephone 01206 872626

 

Availability
Yes
No
Yes

External examiner

No external examiner information available for this module.
Resources
Available via Moodle
Of 20 hours, 20 (100%) hours available to students:
0 hours not recorded due to service coverage or fault;
0 hours not recorded due to opt-out by lecturer(s), module, or event type.

 

Further information

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