HU300-6-FY-CO:
Selected Issues in Human Rights

The details
2022/23
Human Rights Centre
Colchester Campus
Full Year
Undergraduate: Level 6
Current
Thursday 06 October 2022
Friday 30 June 2023
30
01 March 2022

 

Requisites for this module
HU200
(none)
(none)
(none)

 

(none)

Key module for

BA V1L2 History with Human Rights,
BA V1L8 History with Human Rights (Including Foundation Year),
BA V1LF History with Human Rights (Including Year Abroad),
BA V1LG History with Human Rights (Including Placement Year),
BA T7M8 Latin American studies with Human Rights (Including Foundation Year),
BA T7M9 Latin American Studies with Human Rights,
BA V5M8 Philosophy with Human Rights (Including Foundation Year),
BA V5M9 Philosophy with Human Rights,
BA V5MX Philosophy with Human Rights (Including Year Abroad),
BA V6M9 Philosophy with Human Rights (Including Placement Year),
BA VLM8 Philosophy with Human Rights (Including Foundation Year and Year Abroad),
BA L219 Politics with Human Rights (Including Placement Year),
BA L2M8 Politics with Human Rights (Including Foundation Year),
BA L2M9 Politics with Human Rights,
BA LFM9 Politics with Human Rights (Including Year Abroad),
BA L3J9 Sociology with Human Rights (Including Placement Year),
BA L3M9 Sociology with Human Rights,
BA LMJ9 Sociology with Human Rights (Including Year Abroad),
LLB MM20 Law with Human Rights,
LLB MM21 Law with Human Rights (Including Year Abroad),
LLB MM22 Law with Human Rights (Including Placement Year),
LLB MM30 Law with Human Rights (Including Foundation Year),
BA P570 Journalism with Human Rights,
BA P571 Journalism with Human Rights (Including Year Abroad),
BA P572 Journalism with Human Rights (Including Placement Year),
BA LL37 Social Anthropology with Human Rights,
BA LL38 Social Anthropology with Human Rights (Including Year Abroad),
BA LL39 Social Anthropology with Human Rights (Including Placement Year),
BA L914 Global Studies with Human Rights,
BA L916 Global Studies with Human Rights (Including Foundation Year),
BA L917 Global Studies with Human Rights (Including Placement Year),
BA L918 Global Studies with Human Rights (Including Year Abroad),
BA V301 Curating, Heritage and Human Rights,
BA V302 Curating, Heritage and Human Rights (including Foundation Year),
BA V303 Curating, Heritage and Human Rights (Including Placement Year),
BA V304 Curating, Heritage and Human Rights (Including Year Abroad)

Module description

This course seeks to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the relevance and role of human rights to a number of contemporary issues.

Topics are examined, such as exploring the meaning of rights for those most vulnerable and marginalised in society: women's rights, minority rights, socio-economic rights and poverty, the rights of persons with disabilities and indigenous peoples' rights.

Module aims

(a) To build and consolidate knowledge and skills gained in HU100 and HU200.
(b) To examine the relevance and role of human rights to a number of contemporary issues.
(c) To examine selected substantive human rights in national, regional and global contexts.
(d) To introduce students to comparative human rights analysis.

Module learning outcomes

At the end of this module, students will demonstrate the ability to critically analyse select contemporary human rights issues from a range of different perspectives.

Students will evaluate key normative concepts and ideas, such as equality, human dignity and non-discrimination, and comprehend both the historical bases and the philosophical arguments underpinning the modern rights infrastructure.

Students will understand the various human rights frameworks (international, regional, domestic) and recognise how these interact with regards to specific human rights issues and cases.

Students, working both independently and collaboratively, will be able to synthesise and present human rights arguments in a coherent manner, communicating through their written outputs, in-class contributions, and oral presentations.

Module information


The module is co-taught by experts from the Sociology and Philosophy department, as well as the Law School and Human Rights Centre.

Learning and teaching methods

This module is taught through a mixture of weekly live webinars, pre-recorded videos, and tutorials. Each week, the module teaching team will first produce and make available on Moodle two 25-minute pre-recorded video lectures. The module teaching team will then deliver a weekly live 50-minute webinar in which they further explore key legal concepts and answer your questions about the topics. These lectures and webinars will subsequently be available online through Moodle so that you can re-watch them as part of your independent study. Alongside this, there will be five bi-weekly 50-minute small group tutorials.The module teaching team will also produce and make available on Moodle short guidance notes. These notes will introduce the material to be covered in thelectures, webinars and required readings. The notes will also contain tips designed both to help you navigate the material to be covered in the lectures and webinars and to equip you to analyse the required readings. You will be expected to have completed the required readings in advance of your tutorials. Your tutorials will enable you to discuss the material covered in lectures, webinars and the required readings, obtain feedback on your pre-class preparation and deepen your understanding of key concepts.To help you prepare in the best possible way for your tutorials, you will be completing regular small assessed activities to enable you to reflect upon and track your progress, understand what youare doing well, and give you clear feedback to help you manage your studies and your progress.

Bibliography*

  • Smith, Rhona K. M. (2018) International human rights law, New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
  • Castellino, Joshua; Domínguez Redondo, Elvira. (2006) Minority rights in Asia: a comparative legal analysis, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Marks, Stephen P. (2018) 'Poverty', in International human rights law, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Gonzalez, Carmen. (2015) 'Environmental Justice, Human Rights and the Global South', in Santa Clara Journal of International Law. vol. 13 (1) , pp.151-196
  • Security Council Resolution 2171 - UNSCR, http://unscr.com/en/resolutions/2171
  • Morris, Lydia. (2018) 'Moral economy from above and below: contesting contraction of migrant rights in austerity Britain', in Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies., pp.1-18
  • (no date) General Comment on Article 12: Equal Recognition Before the Law.
  • Piotrowicz, Ryszard. (2009) 'The Legal Nature of Trafficking in Human Beings', in The Legal Nature of Trafficking in Human Beings. vol. 4 (2009) , pp.175-2042009
  • Scheinin, Martin. (2018) 'Terrorism', in International human rights law, Oxford: Oxford University Press., pp.550-566
  • (no date) United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
  • Thomas O'Shea. (no date) Consent in History, Theory and Practice - Essex Autonomy Project.
  • Cowan, Jane K.; Dembour, Marie-Bénédicte; Wilson, Richard. (2001) Culture and rights: anthropological perspectives, New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Yilmaz, I. (2016) 'The Nature of Islamophobia: Some Key Features', in Fear of Muslims? International Perspectives on Islamophobia, Switzerland: Springer.
  • Morris, Lydia. (2012-12) 'Understanding torture: the strengths and the limits of social theory', in The International Journal of Human Rights. vol. 16 (8) , pp.1127-1141
  • OHCHR | Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, https://www.ohchr.org/en/professionalinterest/pages/protocoltraffickinginpersons.aspx
  • Slavery and Human Trafficking, https://www.coe.int/en/web/impact-convention-human-rights/slavery-and-human-trafficking
  • Vivienne Ashley. (no date) Philosophical Models of Autonomy - Essex Autonomy Project.
  • Morris, Lydia. (2020-04) 'Activating the Welfare Subject: The Problem of Agency', in Sociology. vol. 54 (2) , pp.275-291
  • (no date) Mental Capacity Act 2005: Statute Law Database.
  • Steven Lukes. (2006) 'Liberal Democratic Torture', in Liberal Democratic Torture. vol. 36 (1) , pp.1-16
  • Kayess, Rosemary; French, Phillip. (2008) 'Out of Darkness into Light - Introducing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities', in Human Rights Law Review. vol. 8 (1) , pp.1-34
  • (2018) International human rights law, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Morris, Lydia. Department of Sociology, University of Essex, Colchester, England, ldmorris@essex.ac.uk. (2016) 'The moral economy of austerity: Analysing UK welfare reform.', in The moral economy of austerity: Analysing UK welfare reform.. vol. 67 (1) , pp.97-117
  • Morris, Lydia. (2013) Human rights and social theory, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Universal Declaration of Human Rights | United Nations, https://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/
  • Arendt, Hannah; Canovan, Margaret. (1998) The human condition, Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.
  • Rantsev v. Cyprus and Russia, https://hudoc.echr.coe.int/fre#{"itemid":["002-1142"]}
  • Steiner, Henry J.; Alston, Philip; Goodman, Ryan. (2007) International human rights in context: law, politics, morals : text and materials, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Russo, Nancy F.; Pirlott, Angela. (2006) 'Gender-Based Violence: Concepts, Methods, and Findings', in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. vol. 1087 (1) , pp.178-205
  • Encore -- The topology of welfare-migration-asylum: Britain's outsiders inside, https://lib.essex.ac.uk/iii/encore/record/C__Rx1073334__SThe topology of welfare-migration-asylum: Britain's outsiders inside__Orightresult__U__X4?lang=eng&suite=cobalt
  • Pogge, Thomas. (2011) 'Are We Violating the Human Rights of the World's Poor', in Yale Human Rights & Development Law Journal. vol. 14 (2) , pp.1-33
  • Luna, Zakiya; Luker, Kristin. (2013) 'Reproductive Justice', in Annual Review of Law and Social Science. vol. 9 (1) , pp.327-352
  • Marks, Susan; Clapham, Andrew. (2005) International human rights lexicon, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Doyle, O. (2007-02-14) 'Direct Discrimination, Indirect Discrimination and Autonomy', in Oxford Journal of Legal Studies. vol. 27 (3) , pp.537-553
  • Degener, Theresia. (2017) '10 years of Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities', in Netherlands Quarterly of Human Rights. vol. 35 (3) , pp.152-157

The above list is indicative of the essential reading for the course. The library makes provision for all reading list items, with digital provision where possible, and these resources are shared between students. Further reading can be obtained from this module's reading list.

Assessment items, weightings and deadlines

Coursework / exam Description Deadline Weighting
Coursework   Group Presentation (HU300 Selected Issues in Human Rights)    20% 
Coursework   Essay (HU300 Selected Issues in Human Rights)    40% 
Coursework   Report I (HU300 Selected Issues in Human Rights)    20% 
Coursework   Report 2 (HU300 Selected Issues in Human Rights)    20% 

Overall assessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%

Reassessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%
Module supervisor and teaching staff
Dr Aoife Duffy, email: aoife.duffy@essex.ac.uk.
Dr. Erin Pobjie, Dr. Aoife Duffy, Prof Wayne Martin, Prof Wayne Martin, Dr. Carlos Gigoux Gramegna
Law UG Education Administrators - schooloflawug@essex.ac.uk

 

Availability
Yes
No
Yes

External examiner

Dr Thomas Pegram
University College London
Associate Professor
Dr Panagiotis Kapotas
Resources
Available via Moodle
Of 1596 hours, 18 (1.1%) hours available to students:
1578 hours not recorded due to service coverage or fault;
0 hours not recorded due to opt-out by lecturer(s).

 

Further information
Human Rights Centre

* Please note: due to differing publication schedules, items marked with an asterisk (*) base their information upon the previous academic year.

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