GV915-7-SU-CO:
Applied Research Design

The details
2024/25
Government
Colchester Campus
Summer
Postgraduate: Level 7
Current
Tuesday 22 April 2025
Friday 27 June 2025
15
22 April 2024

 

Requisites for this module
(none)
(none)
GV914
(none)

 

(none)

Key module for

MRESL25024 International Relations,
MRESL20624 Political Economy,
MSC L20012 Political Science,
MSC L200EB Political Science,
MRESL20024 Political Science

Module description

This module prepares students to replicate and extend published research. For this module, replication includes but it is not limited to the re-estimation of models using the data and codes provided by the authors. Additionally, students are expected to analyse the data accuracy and appropriateness of the modelling choices – i.e., consulting original sources of the data, and/or using alternative operationalization for key variables, and/or using alternative estimation techniques to assess the robustness of the findings.


For the extension component of this module, students should introduce a theory-informed modification that would allow them to build upon that study, and test it. The hypothesis could propose a conditional effect (an interaction), a differential effect for larger or different samples or subsamples, a different effect after the removal of outliers, the test for selection effects, or the inclusion of third variables that could be affecting the relationship of interest, among other innovations.


This component is not a mechanical data-mining exercise. Students should theoretically justify the inclusion of this hypothesis or of any empirical innovations.

Module aims

The module will orient and support students’ replication and extension of a recent research article. The article must have been published in the past five years in a major political science journal.

For this module, replication includes but it is not limited to the re-estimation of models using the data and codes provided by the authors. Additionally, students are expected to consult original sources of the data, and/or use alternative operationalization for key variables, and/or use alternative estimation techniques to assess the robustness of the findings to other operationalization and/or measurement and/or modeling choices. Students need to analyze the robustness and/or limits of generalization of the replicated findings.

For the extension component of this module, students should propose an additional hypothesis grounded on the theory, and test it. The hypothesis could propose a conditional effect (an interaction), a differential effect for larger or different samples or in subsamples, a different effect after the removal of outliers, the test for selection effects, or the inclusion of third variables that could be affecting the relationship of interest, among other innovations. This component is not a mechanical data-mining exercise. Students should theoretically justify the inclusion of this hypothesis or of any empirical innovations.

Module learning outcomes

By the end of this module, students will be expected to be able to:



  1. understand the purpose and importance of replication in social sciences;

  2. replicate and extend a recent research article;

  3. evaluate critically, provide constructive feedback, and propose avenues for further research to peers and to extant research.


Module information

No additional information available.

Learning and teaching methods

The module consists of five meetings to support students in the process of replicating and building upon published research.

Sequential assessments are designed to discuss and provide feedback on each of the stages of the process of replicating and extending published empirical research. This allows students to reinforce concepts of research design and to practice different forms of communicating research.

Bibliography*

This module does not appear to have a published bibliography.

Assessment items, weightings and deadlines

Coursework / exam Description Deadline Coursework weighting
Coursework   Replication Proposal    20% 
Coursework   Replication Intermediate Report     36% 
Coursework   Comments on peers' replication projects    5% 
Coursework   Replication Paper    39% 

Exam format definitions

  • Remote, open book: Your exam will take place remotely via an online learning platform. You may refer to any physical or electronic materials during the exam.
  • In-person, open book: Your exam will take place on campus under invigilation. You may refer to any physical materials such as paper study notes or a textbook during the exam. Electronic devices may not be used in the exam.
  • In-person, open book (restricted): The exam will take place on campus under invigilation. You may refer only to specific physical materials such as a named textbook during the exam. Permitted materials will be specified by your department. Electronic devices may not be used in the exam.
  • In-person, closed book: The exam will take place on campus under invigilation. You may not refer to any physical materials or electronic devices during the exam. There may be times when a paper dictionary, for example, may be permitted in an otherwise closed book exam. Any exceptions will be specified by your department.

Your department will provide further guidance before your exams.

Overall assessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%

Reassessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%
Module supervisor and teaching staff
Dr Nelson Ruiz, email: nelson.ruiz@essex.ac.uk.
Nelson Ruiz
Please contact govpgquery@essex.ac.uk

 

Availability
No
No
No

External examiner

Dr Kyriaki Nanou
Durham University
Associate Professor in European politics
Resources
Available via Moodle
Of 6 hours, 6 (100%) hours available to students:
0 hours not recorded due to service coverage or fault;
0 hours not recorded due to opt-out by lecturer(s).

 

Further information
Government

* Please note: due to differing publication schedules, items marked with an asterisk (*) base their information upon the previous academic year.

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