GV902-7-AU-CO:
Theories of International Relations

The details
2023/24
Government
Colchester Campus
Autumn
Postgraduate: Level 7
Current
Thursday 05 October 2023
Friday 15 December 2023
15
20 April 2023

 

Requisites for this module
(none)
(none)
(none)
(none)

 

(none)

Key module for

MA L25012 International Relations,
MA L250EB International Relations,
MA L250EK International Relations,
MRESL25024 International Relations,
MSC L25012 International Relations,
MSC L250EB International Relations,
MSC L250EK International Relations,
MPOLL268 International Relations,
MPOLL269 International Relations (Including Placement Year),
MPOLL370 International Relations (Including Year Abroad),
MPOLL234 Politics and International Relations,
MPOLL235 Politics and International Relations (Including Placement Year),
MPOLL236 Politics and International Relations (Including Year Abroad)

Module description

The objective of the course is to provide students with an overview of different epistemological and theoretical perspectives commonly encountered in the discipline of international relations and to consider how these different approaches are used to explain historical and contemporary events in world politics. The course aims to provide a sound basis for studying international relations and world politics from different epistemological, theoretical, and methodological viewpoints.


Through the module, student will: (i) understand the origins, historical evolution, and current debates and challenges of the discipline of international relations, (ii) identity and explain different theories and paradigmatic perspectives commonly employed in international relations research, (iii) critically evaluate common theoretical approaches and critique contemporary disciplinary scholarship in international politics, (iv) apply different theoretical lenses to analyse historical and contemporary events in international politics.

Module aims

The aims of this module are:



  • To provide students with an overview of a wide and intellectually demanding range of IR literature and the ability to use this material to analyze world politics.

  • To provide a basis for studying politics from different theoretical and methodological viewpoints.

Module learning outcomes

By the end of this module, students will be expected to be able to:



  1. Understand the origins, historical evolution, and current debates and challenges of the discipline of international relations.

  2. Identity and explain different theories and paradigmatic perspectives commonly employed in international relations research.

  3. Critically evaluate common theoretical approaches and critique contemporary disciplinary scholarship in international politics.

  4. Apply different theoretical lenses to analyse historical and contemporary events in international politics.

  5. Synthesise different arguments from international relations scholarship in order to evaluate the current state of knowledge on a topic within the field.

Module information

This course will help students to develop the following skills: (i) Communication, presentation and argumentation skills, (ii) team-work skills in joint presentations and small discussion groups, (iii) writing and research skills through essays, assignments, and presentations, (iv) improving their own learning and performance by responding to comments, including criticism, (v) information technology skills through using research tools, (vi) self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, (vii) development of qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment, requiring the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility.

Learning and teaching methods

The module will run over 10 weeks. There will be a two-hour class.

Bibliography

The above list is indicative of the essential reading for the course.
The library makes provision for all reading list items, with digital provision where possible, and these resources are shared between students.
Further reading can be obtained from this module's reading list.

Assessment items, weightings and deadlines

Coursework / exam Description Deadline Coursework weighting
Coursework   Research questions and hypotheses in IR  08/11/2023  20% 
Coursework   Literature and data reviews  13/12/2023  40% 
Coursework   Research design Paper  07/02/2024  40% 

Exam format definitions

  • Remote, open book: Your exam will take place remotely via an online learning platform. You may refer to any physical or electronic materials during the exam.
  • In-person, open book: Your exam will take place on campus under invigilation. You may refer to any physical materials such as paper study notes or a textbook during the exam. Electronic devices may not be used in the exam.
  • In-person, open book (restricted): The exam will take place on campus under invigilation. You may refer only to specific physical materials such as a named textbook during the exam. Permitted materials will be specified by your department. Electronic devices may not be used in the exam.
  • In-person, closed book: The exam will take place on campus under invigilation. You may not refer to any physical materials or electronic devices during the exam. There may be times when a paper dictionary, for example, may be permitted in an otherwise closed book exam. Any exceptions will be specified by your department.

Your department will provide further guidance before your exams.

Overall assessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%

Reassessment

Coursework Exam
100% 0%
Module supervisor and teaching staff

 

Availability
Yes
No
Yes

External examiner

Dr Damien Bol
King's College London
Senior Lecturer
Resources
Available via Moodle
Of 20 hours, 20 (100%) hours available to students:
0 hours not recorded due to service coverage or fault;
0 hours not recorded due to opt-out by lecturer(s), module, or event type.

 

Further information
Government

Disclaimer: The University makes every effort to ensure that this information on its Module Directory is accurate and up-to-date. Exceptionally it can be necessary to make changes, for example to programmes, modules, facilities or fees. Examples of such reasons might include a change of law or regulatory requirements, industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key personnel, change in government policy, or withdrawal/reduction of funding. Changes to modules may for example consist of variations to the content and method of delivery or assessment of modules and other services, to discontinue modules and other services and to merge or combine modules. The University will endeavour to keep such changes to a minimum, and will also keep students informed appropriately by updating our programme specifications and module directory.

The full Procedures, Rules and Regulations of the University governing how it operates are set out in the Charter, Statutes and Ordinances and in the University Regulations, Policy and Procedures.