EC367-6-SP-CO:
The Economic Geography of Employment, Innovation and Trade

The details
2023/24
Economics
Colchester Campus
Spring
Undergraduate: Level 6
Current
Monday 15 January 2024
Friday 22 March 2024
15
04 September 2023

 

Requisites for this module
(none)
(none)
(none)
(none)

 

(none)

Key module for

BA 9O47 International Economics (Including Placement Year),
BA L115 International Economics,
BA L160 International Economics (Including Foundation Year),
BA L163 International Economics (Including Year Abroad),
BSC 5H18 International Economics (Including Placement Year),
BSC L116 International Economics,
BSC L161 International Economics (Including Foundation Year),
BSC L162 International Economics (Including Year Abroad),
MECNL132 International Economics,
MECNLC32 International Economics (Including Placement Year),
MECNLC33 International Economics (Including Year Abroad)

Module description

This module discusses topics of economic geography. Special attention will be devoted to building bridges with topics in labour economics, and productivity and technology. Topics of focus include (a) foreign direct investment, agglomeration and knowledge diffusion, (b) the effect of technological change and globalization on local labour markets, (c) the gravity equation and labour mobility. Attention will also be devoted to empirical methods.


In terms of employability skills, the module mainly offers a variety of academic skills and promotes external awareness. With regard to academic skills, the module encourages analytical reasoning, critical evaluation, and the ability to use and interpret mathematical relations. By doing so, it provides students with the economic background to debate world trade related issues. Indeed, discussions of real world applications promote external awareness among the students. Students are also encouraged to write the term paper to extend their knowledge, improve their research techniques and essay-writing skills.

Module aims

The aim of this module is:



  • To familiarise students with the tools and basic concepts required to understand the forces that shape international trade and help determine trade policies.

Module learning outcomes

By the end of this module, students will be expected to be able to:



  1. Make sense of discussions of international trade in the business press and to express their own opinion.

  2. Understand that economic policy must consider the significant interaction between different sectors of the economy.

  3. Further their understanding of the role of economic modelling. In particular, trade theory is a good illustration of how different models can (and must) be used to analyse a given economic issue.

Module information

No additional information available.

Learning and teaching methods

The module will be delivered via:

  • One lecture per week
  • One class per week

in one term.

Feedback for this module will occur through class meetings where we will go over the answers to problem sets and where you will be able to ask questions about your own method of solution; answers that will be posted on the website for the module that will give you written guidance on the appropriate method to approach the problems, assignments, and tests; and office hours where any additional questions can be addressed. You should be sure that you use these methods to understand how to improve your own performance. For modules including a term paper, the term paper will be returned with individualised feedback that addresses what the marking criteria are and how you could improve your own work.

Bibliography

  • Rosenthal, S.S. and Strange, W.C. (2020) ‘How Close Is Close? The Spatial Reach of Agglomeration Economies’, The Journal of Economic Perspectives, 34(3), pp. 27–49. Available at: https://www.jstor.org/stable/26923540.
  • Michael Greenstone, Richard Hornbeck and Enrico Moretti (2010) ‘Identifying Agglomeration Spillovers: Evidence from Winners and Losers of Large Plant Openings’, Journal of Political Economy, 118(3), pp. 536–598. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1086/653714.
  • Serafinelli, M. and Tabellini, G. (2022) ‘Creativity over time and space’, Journal of Economic Growth [Preprint]. Available at: https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s10887-021-09199-6.pdf.
  • Kline, Patrick (no date) ‘Place Based Policies, Heterogeneity, and Agglomeration’, American Economic Review, 100(2), pp. 383–87. Available at: https://doi.org/DOI: 10.1257/aer.100.2.383.
  • Kline, P. and Moretti, E. (2014) ‘Local Economic Development, Agglomeration Economies, and the Big Push: 100 Years of Evidence from the Tennessee Valley Authority *’, The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 129(1), pp. 275–331. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1093/qje/qjt034.
  • Barrero, Jose Maria; Bloom, Nick; Davis, Steven J. (no date) ‘Why Working From Home Will Stick’, SocArXiv [Preprint]. Available at: https://ideas.repec.org/p/osf/socarx/wfdbe.html#.
The above list is indicative of the essential reading for the course.
The library makes provision for all reading list items, with digital provision where possible, and these resources are shared between students.
Further reading can be obtained from this module's reading list.

Assessment items, weightings and deadlines

Coursework / exam Description Deadline Coursework weighting
Coursework   EC367 Term Paper  03/05/2024   
Exam  Main exam: In-Person, Open Book, 120 minutes during Summer (Main Period) 
Exam  Reassessment Main exam: In-Person, Open Book, 120 minutes during September (Reassessment Period) 

Exam format definitions

  • Remote, open book: Your exam will take place remotely via an online learning platform. You may refer to any physical or electronic materials during the exam.
  • In-person, open book: Your exam will take place on campus under invigilation. You may refer to any physical materials such as paper study notes or a textbook during the exam. Electronic devices may not be used in the exam.
  • In-person, open book (restricted): The exam will take place on campus under invigilation. You may refer only to specific physical materials such as a named textbook during the exam. Permitted materials will be specified by your department. Electronic devices may not be used in the exam.
  • In-person, closed book: The exam will take place on campus under invigilation. You may not refer to any physical materials or electronic devices during the exam. There may be times when a paper dictionary, for example, may be permitted in an otherwise closed book exam. Any exceptions will be specified by your department.

Your department will provide further guidance before your exams.

Overall assessment

Coursework Exam
25% 75%

Reassessment

Coursework Exam
25% 75%
Module supervisor and teaching staff
Dr Emma Duchini, email: e.duchini@essex.ac.uk.
Lectures: Dr Emma Duchini / Classes: Dr Arsham Reisinezhad
For further information, send an email message to fineco@essex.ac.uk.

 

Availability
Yes
Yes
No

External examiner

Dr Giancarlo Ianulardo
University of Exeter Business School
Lecturer in Economics
Resources
Available via Moodle
Of 15 hours, 15 (100%) hours available to students:
0 hours not recorded due to service coverage or fault;
0 hours not recorded due to opt-out by lecturer(s), module, or event type.

 

Further information
Economics

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