BS352-6-AU-CO:
Freshwater Ecology

The details
2020/21
Life Sciences (School of)
Colchester Campus
Autumn
Undergraduate: Level 6
Current
Thursday 08 October 2020
Friday 18 December 2020
15
16 January 2020

 

Requisites for this module
BS257
(none)
(none)
(none)

 

(none)

Key module for

(none)

Module description

Freshwater systems constitute only a small proportion of the Earth's aquatic environments yet they play an essential role in the ecology of many species. Freshwater resources are increasingly threatened by water extraction, pollution and climate change.

This module describes the major groups of freshwater habitats (streams, rivers, ponds, lakes) and outlines key principles of hydrology and limnology, including chemistry and physical properties, production and cycling of organic matter, the functioning of different trophic groups, eutrophication, and places this in context of the challenges in managing freshwater resources for biodiversity, ecosystem services, and human populations.

Module aims

This module aims to describe the major groups of freshwater habitats (streams, rivers, ponds, lakes) and outlines key principles of hydrology and limnology, including chemistry and physical properties, production and cycling of organic matter, the functioning of different trophic groups, eutrophication, and places this in context of the challenges in managing freshwater resources for biodiversity, ecosystem services, and human populations.
This module aims to describe the major groups of freshwater habitats (streams, rivers, ponds, lakes) and outlines key principles of hydrology and limnology, including chemistry and physical properties, production and cycling of organic matter, the functioning of different trophic groups, eutrophication, and places this in context of the challenges in managing freshwater resources for biodiversity, ecosystem services, and human populations.

Module learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:

1. discuss how principles of hydrology and limnology underpin the structure and function of communities in freshwater systems;
2. describe the roles of the major groups of organisms in freshwater systems in the functioning of habitats, the flow of materials (nutrients, energy) through these communities;
3. demonstrate an ability to analyse data and interpret findings in the context of limnology;
4. discuss topical issues in freshwater management demonstrating the importance of ongoing scientific understanding in these debates.

Module information

No additional information available.

Learning and teaching methods

20 x 1 hour lectures, plus 1 revision class before summer exam

Bibliography*

  • Moss, Brian. (c2010) Ecology of freshwaters: a view for the twenty-first century, Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Dodds, Walter K.; Whiles, Matt R. (c2010) Freshwater ecology: concepts and environmental applications of limnology, Burlington, MA: Academic Press.

The above list is indicative of the essential reading for the course. The library makes provision for all reading list items, with digital provision where possible, and these resources are shared between students. Further reading can be obtained from this module's reading list.

Overall assessment

Coursework Exam
0% 100%

Reassessment

Coursework Exam
0% 100%
Module supervisor and teaching staff
Dr Thomas Cameron, email: tcameron@essex.ac.uk.
Dr Tom Cameron, Dr Etienne Low-Decarie
School Undergraduate Office, email: bsugoffice (Non essex users should add @essex.ac.uk to create the full email address)

 

Availability
Yes
No
No

External examiner

Dr Nicholas Kamenos
University of Glasgow
Reader
Resources
Available via Moodle
Of 24 hours, 22 (91.7%) hours available to students:
2 hours not recorded due to service coverage or fault;
0 hours not recorded due to opt-out by lecturer(s).

 

Further information
Life Sciences (School of)

* Please note: due to differing publication schedules, items marked with an asterisk (*) base their information upon the previous academic year.

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