Students Staff

Staff publications

Here is a selection of book publications by our staff. See our individual academic staff profiles for full publication lists or search our research repository.

Editors' choice

Dr Deirdre Serjeantson's article 'Milton and the Tradition of Protestant Petrarchism' was chosen as “editors' choice” for 2015 by The Review of English Studies (RES).

Writing the Haiti-Dominican Republic border

On the Edge: Writing the Border between Haiti and the Dominican Republic is the latest publication by Professor Maria Cristina Fumagalli. Published by Liverpool University Press, the book belongs to a series produced as part of the Department's Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)-funded research project American Tropics: Towards a Literary Geography.

Cinema of the Darkside

Dr Shohini Chaudhuri's 2014 publication Cinema of the Dark Side: Atrocity and the Ethics of Film Spectatorship investigates the ethical potential of cinematic images of atrocity. Read the Times Higher Education Review:

Cinematicity in Media History

Dr Jeffrey Geiger and Dr Karin Littau talk about their latest publication Cinematicity in Media History.

More publications

Creative writing

  • James Canton

    Book cover image of Ancient Wonderings

    Ancient Wonderings, William Collins, 2017

    James Canton travels the length of Britain in a quest to discover the prehistorical treasures, beliefs and cultural practices that are embedded in the makeup of our physical landscape. From an undeciphered Pictish stone north of Aberdeen to the edge of an Ice Age land in the North Sea, Canton immerses himself in the contours, geography and geology of the landscape, journeying across Britain's wildest lands on a trail of prehistoric enlightenment.

  • Matthew De Abaitua

    Book cover image of The Red Men

    The Red Men, Snowbooks 2007, Gollancz 2013, Angry Robot 2017

    A literary thriller for an out-of-control age, The Red Men captures the shocking, baffling quality of life in our new century, a battle in which even ordinary men like Nelson must take sides to survive. Shortlisted for the Arthur C Clarke Award.

     

    Book cover image of The Destructives

    The Destructives, Angry Robot 2016

    Theodore Drown is a destructive. A recovering addict to weirdcore, he's keeping his head down lecturing at the university of the Moon. Twenty years after the appearance of the first artificial intelligence, and humanity is stuck.

     

     

    Book cover image of If Then

    IF THEN, Angry Robot 2015

    Exposed to constant shellfire and haunted by ghostly snipers, the stretcher-bearers work day and night on the long carry of wounded men. One night they stumble across an ancient necropolis, disturbed by an exploding shell.

     

     

    Book cover image of The Art of Camping

    The Art of Camping: The History and Practice of Sleeping Under the Stars, Hamish Hamilton 2011, Penguin 2012

    The Art of Camping is a witty and philosophical blend of 'how to', history and personal anecdotes - a must for every camper. Beautiful line illustrations, practical camping tips are included.

     

  • Adrian May

    Book cover image of Discovering England

    Discovering England, Wivenbooks, 2017

    In the Discovering England collection May takes a wry, left-wing look at the vexed questions of English identity, ranging from the comic to the poignant, where "Nobody hates the English as much as they hate themselves". A selection of songs from the book are included on CD, recorded by May with his band 'Face Furniture and the Extensions'.

     

    Book cover image of Comedy of Masculinity

    Comedy of Masculinity, Wivenbooks, 2014

    The Comedy of Masculinity collection contain a wry and witty look at men and masculinity. A selection of songs from the book are included on CD, recorded by May and Murray Griffin - known together by their stage name of 'Face Furniture'.

     

     

    Book cover image of Ballads of Bohemian Essex

    Ballads of Bohemian Essex, Wivenbooks, 2011

    The Ballads of Bohemian Essex collection tells of May's 'spent youth' in Braintree, and of his life as a third generation bohemian singer, poet, and musician.

     

     

    Book cover image of Myth and Creative Writing

    Myth and Creative Writing: the Self-Renewing Song, Longman, 2010

    Offering writing exercises and examples of the use of myth in prose, poetry and song, Adrian May provides a clear and accessible guide through the process of writing and how it can be enhanced by myth. From the classical to fairytale, the Biblical to urban myth, and symbols of nature and time, the concept of myth in all its forms is studied with insight and sensitivity.

     

    Book cover image of An Essex Attitude

    An Essex Attitude, Wivenhoe, 2010

    Born, bred, buttered and jammed-on-the-A12 in Essex, Adrian May writes poems full of Essex attitude: down-to-earth, poignant, funny, defiantly in the world of everyday; playful and witty, but not unserious. This is his unique first collection, and has an introduction by cultural critic Marina Warner, and foreword by poet Martin Newell.

     

  • Philip Terry

    Book cover image of Tapestry

    Tapestry, Reality Street, 2013

    Taking as its starting point marginal images in the Bayeux Tapestry, which have been left largely unexplained by historians, Terry retells the story of the Norman Conquest from the point of view of the tapestry's English embroiderers. Combining magic realism and Oulipian techniques, this is a tour de force of narrative and language.

     

    Book cover image of Shakespeare's Sonnets

    Shakespeare's Sonnets, Carcanet Press, 2010

    Inspired by the flotsam of contemporary culture, by the language of journalism and spam emails, Philip Terry transforms Shakespeare's sonnet sequence into a celebration of the possibilities of language unleashed. Shakespeare's themes of fading beauty, posterity, immortality and death find their contemporary responses in the world of celebrity gossip, consumer products and the credit crunch. The results spark with energy, as disrespectful and anarchic as a cartoon - and as assured in their control of line.

    Book cover image of Elementary Morality

    Raymond Queneau Elementary Morailty translated by Philip Terry, Carcanet, 2007

    The first English translation of Queneau's last book is a distillation a lifetime's work: as Surrealist, flâneur, mathematician, poet, student of Eastern philosophy, experimental novelist and co-founder of OuLiPo, the 'workshop for potential literature'.

    Its 131 texts in the form of quennets - an invented form - and prose poems generated by the hexagrams of the I Ching, are a remarkable meditation on landscape, death, war, Surrealism, and memory, at once playful, mysterious and illuminating.

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    Ovid Metamorphosed, Vintage, 2001, Chatto & Windus, 2000

    For this collection Philip Terry asked leading writers to take Ovid as a starting point and set their invention free.

    The results are startling, from Apollo and Phaeton transposed to a Dutch classroom to Diana and Actaeon in the rain of Nova Scotia.

    We find fables, grotesques and white-coated scientists; sports-cars, swans and shells, and even Ovid himself speaking to us from beyond the grave.

Drama and theatre studies

  • Clare Finburgh

    Book cover image of Jean Genet

    (with David Bradbury) Jean Genet, Routledge, 2011

    Jean Genet’s significance within twentieth-century theatre has long been understated. This timely book, the only introductory text in English to Genet’s plays in production, presents an overview of an influential and controversial writer whose work prefigured many recent postmodern and post-colonial developments in theatre and performance studies.

    Named as an 'Outstanding Academic Title for 2012' by Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries.

    Book cover of Contemporary French Theatre and Performance

    Claire Finburgh (with Carl Lavery) Contemporary French Theatre and Performance, Palgrave Macmillan, 2011

    Contemporary French Theatre and Performance is a collection of essays exploring the relationship between experimental theatre and performance in France. Essays are by leading scholars and practitioners, and approach the aesthetics and politics of experimental practices, revealing how theatre artists, choreographers and performance makers use their art work to contest reality as it is currently configured in France.

    Book cover of The Politics of Jean Genet's Late Theatre

    Claire Finburgh (with Carl Lavery and Maria Shevtsova) The Politics of Jean Genet's Late Theatre, Palgrave Macmillan, 2006

    Jean Genet: Performance and Politics is the first book to explore the political significance of Genet's performance practice by focusing on his radical experiments, polemical subjects and formal innovations in theatre, film and dance. Its new approach brings together the diverse aspects of Genet's work through essays by international scholars and interviews with key theatre directors including Richard Schechner, Terry Hands, Cornerstone Theatre and Jean-Baptiste Sastre.

  • Liam Jarvis

    • Creating in the Dark: Conceptualising Different Darknesses in Contemporary Practice, Theatre in the Dark: Shadow, Gloom and Blackout in Contemporary Theatre, edited by Adam Alston and Martin Welton, London and New York: Methuen Drama Engage, 2017

    • The Ethics of Mislocalized Selfhood: Proprioceptive Drifting Towards the Virtual Other, 'On Proximity' special edition of Performance Research journal, Vol. 22, No. 4, 2017

    • Time-sculptures of Terrifying Ambiguity: Staging ‘Inner Space’ and Migrating Realities in Analogue’s Living Film Set, International Journal of Performance Arts and Digital Media, Taylor & Francis. Vol. 13, Issue 1, 2017

    • Renegotiating Immersive Participation, Performance and Participation: Practices, Audiences, Politics, edited by Anna Harpin and Helen Nicholson, Great Britain: Palgrave, 2016


  • Elizabeth Kuti

    Book cover image of Fishskin Trousers

    Fishskin Trousers, Nick Hern Books, 2013

    Fishskin Trousers weaves together the haunting tales of three lost people from different eras, united by the common setting of the fishing village of Orford in Suffolk, its castle and its mysterious island, Orford Ness.

    Book cover image of The Six-Days World

    The Six-Days World, Nick Hern Books, 2007

    An emotionally involving family play that evokes the poignancy and the poison of the festive season.

    In a small town in the south east of England, Eddie returns home for a peaceful family Christmas for the first time in many years.

    But neither he nor his parents can forget or forgive themselves for the death of their other son, Richard, and the unanswered questions that surround it.

    Book cover image of The Sugar Wife

    The Sugar Wife, Nick Hern Books, 2005

    Love, lust, prostitution and slavery in a 19th-century Quaker household.

    A devout Quaker, her wealthy husband, a freed American slave and her emancipator come together in 1840s Dublin.

    As they interact, each is revealed to be rather less high-minded than they would like to be thought.

    • Winner of the 2006 Susan Smith Blackburn Prize

  • Jonathan Lichtenstein

    Book cover image of Memory

    Memory, Nick Hern Books, 2006

    Set in East Berlin in 1990, Memory is a play about division, destiny and the undimmed potency of memory itself. The Wall has just been pulled down when a man arrives at the flat of his grandmother with awkward questions about the past. Meanwhile, a generation later, in Bethlehem the Israeli security barrier is going up. First staged at the Clwyd Theatr Cymru in 2006.

     

    Book cover image of The Pull of Negative Gravity

    The Pull of Negative Gravity, Nick Hern Books, 2004

    Premiered at the Traverse Theatre, 2004, The Pull of Negative Gravity is shocking, beautiful and powerful play about the impact of a soldier's injury in a foreign conflict on his family back home. Wounded in the war in Iraq, a young farmer-turned-soldier returns home with injuries that have extraordinary consequences. Lust, temptation, sibling rivalry and the pressures of the past combine with the struggle to maintain a rural existence.

    • Winner of an Edinburgh Fringe First Award

Literature

  • Sanja Bahun

    Sanja Bahun The Pleasures of Daldaldal: Freud, Jokes, and the Development of Intersubjective Aesthetics, Edinburgh University Press, 2017

    Professor Sanja Bahun's most recent article, The Pleasures of Daldaldal: Freud, Jokes, and the Development of Intersubjective Aesthetics has appeared in Modernist Cultures, vol. 12, No. 2 (Jun 2017): pp. 249-274 and is currently the most read article in the issue.

    Sanja Bahun Transitional Justice and the Arts: Reflections on the Field, Routledge, 2015

    Professor Sanja Bahun's essay on the arts and transitional justice for the Theorizing Transitional Justice journal has been praised as "magisterial" and one of the signature contributions in the field, and was selected to feature in the open access Law Explorer in December 2016.

    Cinema, State Socialism and Society in the Soviet Union 
			and Eastern Europe, 1917-1989

    Sanja Bahun (with John Haynes) Cinema, State Socialism and Society in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, 1917-1989, Routledge, 2014

    Cinema, State Socialism and Society in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, 1917-1989 - Re-Visions is a comprehensive re-examination of the cinemas of the Soviet Union and Central and Eastern Europe during the communist era. The book brings together contributions by nine scholars, including editors Professor Bahun and Dr Haynes, and argues that since the end of communism, we are able to view these cinemas in a way that is no longer bound by binary Cold War distinctions.

    Book cover image of Modernism and Melancholia

    Sanja Bahun Modernism and Melancholia, Writing as Countermourning, Oxford University Press, 2013

    Informed by Freud, Klein, Judith Butler, and others, Modernism and Melancholia argues that formal explorations by modernist authors are best interpreted as narratives of historical melancholia. The book shows how a range of novels from 1913 to 1941 perform melancholia in their diction, images, metaphors, syntax, and experimental narrative techniques. Drawing on the narrative theorist, Bakhtin, the term chronotope is used to link all these formal characteristics to a historical moment bounded by two world wars, the loss of stable identities, and the rise of racism and totalitarianism.

    Book cover image of Myth, Literature, and the Unconscious

    Sanja Bahun (with Leon Burnett and Roderick Main) Myth, Literature, and the Unconscious, Karnac, 2013

    Myth, Literature, and the Unconscious contributes to shaping the new interdisciplinary field of myth studies by investigating a vast range of cultural products, from the Mahabharata to J. W. Goethe’s opus and eighteenth-century Japanese fiction, and from William Blake’s visionary poetry to contemporary blockbuster television series. It encompasses mythic topics and figures such as Oedipus, Orpheus, the Scapegoat, and the Hero, while mobilising Freudian, Jungian, object relations, and Lacanian psychoanalytic approaches.

    Book cover image of Language, Ideology, and the Human

    Sanja Bahun (with Dušan Radunović) Language, Ideology, and the Human, New Interventions, Ashgate, 2012

    Language, Ideology, and the Human: New Interventions redefines the critical picture of language as a system of signs and ideological tropes inextricably linked to human existence. Offering reflections on the status, discursive possibilities, and political, ideological and practical uses of oral or written word in both contemporary society and the work of previous thinkers, this book forges a new, diversified perspective on language, ideology, and what it means to be human.

    Book cover image of Myth and Violence in the Contemporary Female Context

    Sanja Bahun (with V.G. Julie Rajan) Myth and Violence in the Contemporary Female Context, New Cassandras, Ashgate, 2011

    How various mythologies challenge, enable, and inspire women artists and activists across the globe to communicate personal and historical experiences of violence is the central concern of this collection. Beginning with the observation that twentieth- and twenty-first century female writers and artists often use myth to represent their social and artistic struggles, the distinguished international scholars and writers consider mythic fabulations as spaces for contested meanings and resistant readings.

    Book cover image of From Canvas to Word

    Sanja Bahun (with V.G. Julie Rajan) From Word to Canvas: Appropriations of Myth in Women's Aesthetic Production, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2009

    From Word to Canvas: Appropriations of Myth in Women’s Aesthetic Production is an innovative collection of essays on female aesthetic production and myth.

    The book examines the ways in which women artists and writers utilize myth in order to negotiate their perceptions of feminine identity and feminine representation in an increasingly complex and culturally hybrid world.

    Book cover image of Violence and Gender in the Globalized World

    Sanja Bahun (with V.G. Julie Rajan) Violence and Gender in the Globalized World, the Intimate and the Extimate, Ashgate, 2009

    Violence and Gender in the Globalized World expands the present discourse on gender and violence, discovering new ways to address the complexities encountered in academic research on the topic. Through the introduction of a variety of uncommonly discussed geopolitical sites and dynamics, the book redefines the critical picture of gender violence in the age of globalization, adopting diverse methodological approaches and various disciplinary praxes in its investigation of the question of violence against women across the globe.

    Book cover image of The Avant-garde and the Margin

    Sanja Bahun (with Marinos Pourgouris) The Avant-garde and the Margin, New Territories of Modernism, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2006

    The Avant-garde and the Margin: New Territories in Modernism refigures the critical and historical picture of the modernist avant-garde by introducing less-commonly discussed geo-artistic sites and dynamics. Contributors explore the multifaceted relations established between the avant-garde “centers” and their counterparts in the cultural “periphery” as well as the unique artistic and literary dialogues which these encounters engendered.

  • Maria Cristina Fumagalli

    Book cover image of On the Edge: Writing the Border between Haiti and the Dominican Republic

    On the Edge: Writing the Border between Haiti and the Dominican Republic, Liverpool University Press, 2015

    On the Edge: Writing the Border between Haiti and the Dominican Republic is a literary and cultural history which brings to the fore a compelling but, so far, largely neglected body of work which has the politics of borderline-crossing as well as the poetics of borderland-dwelling on Hispaniola at its core. Over thirty fictional and non-fictional literary texts are given detailed attention alongside journalism, geo-political-historical accounts of the status quo on the island, and striking visual interventions by artists, photographers and filmmakers.

    Book cover image of Surveying the American Tropics

    Maria Cristina Fumagalli (with Peter Hulme, Owen Robinson and Lesley Wylie) Surveying the American Tropics: A Literary Geography from New York to Rio, Liverpool University Press, 2013

    This collection presents essays by distinguished scholars engaging with the rich diversity of the writing produced within the American Tropics. The region shares a history in terms of its having been the battle ground for European colonial powers fighting indigenous populations and each other for control of land and resources, the arrival of millions of white Europeans and black Africans, and the development of its dominant socio-economic model (the plantation), whose effects lasted at least well into the twentieth century.

    Book cover image of The Cross-Dressed Caribbean, Writings, Politics, Sexualities

    Maria Cristina Fumagalli, (with Bénédicte Ledent, and Roberto del Valle) The Cross-Dressed Caribbean, Writings, Politics, Sexualities, University of Virginia Press, 2013

    Studies of sexuality in Caribbean culture are on the rise, focusing mainly on homosexuality and homophobia or on regional manifestations of normative and nonnormative sexualities. The Cross-Dressed Caribbean extends this exploration by using the trope of transvestism not only to analyse texts and contexts from anglophone, francophone, Spanish, Dutch, and diasporic Caribbean literature and film but also to highlight reinventions of sexuality and resistance to different forms of exploitation and oppression.

    Book cover image of Caribbean Perspectives on Modernity, Returning Medusa's Gaze

    Caribbean Perspectives on Modernity, Returning Medusa's Gaze, University of Virginia Press, 2009

    Redefining modernity from a Caribbean perspective, Maria Cristina Fumagalli shows how the Caribbean's contributions to the modern world provide a more accurate account of the past and have the potential to change the future. The Medusa myth is used to describe how North Atlantic modernity freezes its "others" into a state of perpetual backwardness that produces an ethnocentric narrative based on homogenization, vilification, and disempowerment, that ignores what fails to conform to the story it wants to tell about itself.

    Book cover image of The Flight of the Vernacular

    The Flight of the Vernacular, Seamus Heaney, Derek Walcott and the Impress of Dante, Rodopi, 2001

    In this book, Dante, Seamus Heaney and Derek Walcott engage in an eloquent and meaningful conversation. Dante’s capacity for being faithful to collective historical experience and true to the recognitions of the emerging self, the permanent immediacy of his poetry, the healthy state of his language, and his adamant refusal to get lost in the wide sea of abstraction – all these are shown to have affected, and to continue to affect, Heaney’s and Walcott’s work.

  • John Gillies

    Book cover image of Shakespeare and the Geography of Difference

    Shakespeare and the Geography of Difference, Cambridge University Press, 1994

    Shakespeare's images of the exotic are shown to be firmly based on the margins of contemporary maps; and examination of the icons and emblems of maps raises questions about the mapmakers' overt intentions and instinctive assumptions, and reveals connections between the semiology of a map and that of the theatre.

     

    Book cover image of Playing the Globe

    Playing the Globe, Genre and Geography in English Renaissance Drama, Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1998

    Playing the Globe examines the relationship between English Renaissance drama and Renaissance geography.

    It deals with the impact upon drama of new lands and new peoples and of old lands and ancient peoples that the new geography suddenly made visible in its maps and the accounts of travel writers and explorers.

  • Patricia Gillies

    Book cover image of

    Patricia Gillies (with Richard North and Joe Allard) Longman Anthology of Old English, Old Icelandic and Anglo-Norman Literature Longman, 2011

    The Longman Anthology of Old English, Old Icelandic and Anglo-Norman Literatures provides a scholarly and accessible introduction to the literature which inspired many heroes of modern popular culture and which set the foundations of the English language and literature we know today. The anthology introduces the rich and varied literature of Britain, Scandinavia and France of the period in and around the Viking Age, ranging from the Old English epic Beowulf through to the Anglo-Norman texts which heralded the transition to Middle English.

  • Peter Hulme

    Book cover image of Surveying the American Tropics

    Peter Hulme (with Maria Cristina Fumagalli, Owen Robinson and Lesley Wylie) Surveying the American Tropics: A Literary Geography from New York to Rio, Liverpool University Press, 2013

    This collection presents essays by distinguished scholars engaging with the rich diversity of the writing produced within the American Tropics. The region shares a history in terms of its having been the battle ground for European colonial powers fighting indigenous populations and each other for control of land and resources, the arrival of millions of white Europeans and black Africans, and the development of its dominant socio-economic model (the plantation), whose effects lasted at least well into the twentieth century.

    Book cover image of Cuba's Wild East

    Cuba's Wild East: A Literary Geography of Oriente, Liverpool University Press, 2011

    Cuba’s Wild East: A Literary Geography of Oriente recounts a literary history of modern Cuba that concentrates on the island's often negelcted eastern region. Given the insurgent and revolutionary history of the eastern region, it recounts stories of rebellion, heroism, and sacrifice, and is intimately related to places and sites now belonging to the national pantheon. Embracing fiction, poetry, memoir and testimony, the book features writings by US journalists and novelists alongside Cuban writers.

    Book cover image of Writing, Travel and Empire

    Peter Hulme (with Russell McDougall) Writing, Travel, and Empire: In the Margins of Anthropology, I.B. Tauris, 2007

    The British Empire drew on the talents of many figures, whose lives reveal a rich involvement with the crucial issues of the period. In many cases they left a legacy of travel writing, novels, biography and ethnography which made important contributions to our knowledge of other cultures. Writing from the margins of would become the formalised discipline of anthropology, their work yields interesting insights into issues of empire and academic boundaries, from gender and travel, and racial science, to the globalisation of 'native management' and internal colonies.

    Book cover image of The Tempest

    Peter Hulme (with William H Sherman) The Tempest, a Norton Critical Edition, Norton, 2003

    The Tempest presents some of Shakespeare’s most insightful meditations on the cycle of life-ending and beginning, death and regeneration, bondage and freedom. This Norton Critical Edition is based on the First Folio text and is accompanied by extensive explanatory annotations as well as offering a rich collection of documents related to the play’s central themes, its critical reception, and its creative reinterpretation by playwrights, filmmakers, and poets.

    Book cover image of The Cambridge Companion to Travel Writing

    Peter Hulme (with Tim Youngs) The Cambridge Companion to Travel Writing, Cambridge University Press, 2002

    The Cambridge Companion to Travel Writing is a broad, specially commissioned introduction to travel writing in English between 1500 and the present. Five introductory essays survey the period's travel writing, with six more focusing on areas of particular interest, including Arabia, the Amazon, Ireland, Calcutta, the Congo and California, while the final three analyse the theoretical and cultural dimensions of this enigmatic, influential genre of writing.

    Book cover image of Remnants of Conquest

    Remnants of Conquest: the Island Caribs and their Visitors, Oxford University Press, 2000

    In 1877 a US ornithologist stumbled across a small indigenous Caribbean population, the Caribs, still living in a remote part of the small island of Dominica. His account of his stay among the Caribs started a trickle of visitors which grew to a steady stream and is now in the full flood of mass tourism. Remnants of Conquest offers an account and analysis of these visitors' writings as they struggle to understand the way of life of a twentieth-century indigenous community, inhabitants of a postcolonial world.

    Book cover image of Colonial Encounters

    Colonial Encounters: Europe and the Native Caribbean, Routledge, 1992 [1986]

    Europe encountered America in 1492, a meeting of cultures graphically described in the log-book kept by Christopher Columbus. His stories of peaceful savages and cruel "cannibals" have influenced subsequent descriptions of that native Caribbean society and the encounter itself has obsesssed colonialist writing. Peter Hulme's detailed analyses of these stories bring to light the techniques used to produce within colonial discourse a "savagery", that could be denied the right to possess in law the land that it cultivated.

  • Karin Littau

    Book cover image of Cinematicity in Media History

    Karin Littau (with Sanja Bahun, Clare Finburgh, Danielle Mortimer and Sean Seeger) Migration, special issue of Comparative Critical Studies 11.2-3, 2014

    In July 2013 the University of Essex hosted the XIII International Conference of the British Comparative Literature Association on the theme of ‘Migration’, attended by over 200 delegates from all over the world. The papers selected for this special double-issue of Comparative Critical Studies address the following themes: migrants, travellers and nomads; intercultural identities; migrant literatures; reception and translation. The volume demonstrates the powerful historical and cultural significance of migration.

    Book cover image of Cinematicity in Media History

    Karin Littau (with Jeffrey Geiger) Cinematicity in Media History, Edinburgh University Press, Oxford University Press, 2013

    This collection focuses on the relations of cinema to other media, cultural productions, and diverse forms of entertainment, exploring these sometimes parallel and sometimes more densely intertwined histories. It makes visible the complex ways in which media anticipate, interfere with, and draw on one other, demonstrating how cinematicity makes itself felt in practices of seeing, reading, writing, and thinking both before and after the ‘birth’ of cinema.

    Book cover image of Cinematicity

    Karin Littau (with Jeffrey Geiger) Cinematicity, special issue of Comparative Critical Studies 6.3, 2009

    This collection includes essays by distinguished historians of cinema engaging with the diverse ways in which the 'filmic' permeates nineteenth- and twentieth-century culture, literature and the arts. Topics range from technical analyses of pre-cinematic toys to examinations of the creative impact of optical media on Victorian literary production, from cultural analyses of the city as a hypervisual zone to philosophical discussions of how media have provided metaphors for 'imagining the imagination'.

    Book cover image of Teorías de la lectura

    Karin Littau Teorías de la lectura. Libros, cuerpos y bibliomanía, translated by Elena Marengo, Buenos Aires: Manantial, 2008

    This Spanish translation of Professor Littau’s book Theories of Reading: Books Bodies and Bibliomania was widely reviewed in the press in Argentina, Mexico, and Spain, including in newspapers such as Página, Perfil, Clarín, Ecos de la Costa, and ABC Madrid.

     

    Book cover image of A Companion to Translation Studies

    Karin Littau (with Piotr Kuhiwczak) A Companion to Translation Studies, Multilingual Matters, 2007

    A Companion to Translation Studies provides an authoritative guide to key approaches in translation studies. All essays are specially commissioned and written by leading international experts in the field. The book is divided into nine areas: culture, philosophy, linguistics, history, literary, gender, theatre and opera, screen, and politics. Each chapter explores the the theoretical concepts, issues and debates defining a field within translation studies, and maps out past trends to suggest how future research might develop.

    Book cover image of Theories of Reading

    Karin Littau Theories of Reading: Books, Bodies, and Bilbiomania, Polity Press, 2006

    Why do literary theorists see reading as an act of dispassionate textual analysis and meaning production, when historical evidence shows that readers have often read excessively, obsessively, and for sensory stimulation? Posing these and other questions, this is the first major work to bring insights from book history to bear on literary history and theory. In so doing, the book charts a compelling and innovative history of theories of reading.

     

    Book cover image of Inventions: Literature and Science

    Karin Littau (with Rachel Falconer) Inventions: Literature and Science, special issue of Comparative Critical Studies 2.2, 2005

    This special issue of the house journal of the British Comparative Literature Association is based on the selected proceedings of the X International Conference of the BCLA, held on 12-15 July in 2004 at the University of Leeds on the topic of Invention: Literature and Science.

  • Susan Oliver

    Book cover image of Scott, Byron and the Poetics of Cultural Encounter

    Scott, Byron and the Poetics of Cultural Encounter, Palgrave Macmillan, 2005

    This innovative study explores Scott's and Byron's poetical engagements with borders, actual and metaphorical, and with the people living on and around them. These influential poets' fascination with the 'strangeness' of social structures and with cultural difference is illumined through comparative readings of Scott's collected ballads and narrative poetry, together with Byron's Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, his Eastern Tales and his late, utopian South-Sea poem The Island.

  • Owen Robinson

    Book cover image of Surveying the American Tropics

    (with Maria Cristina Fumagalli, Peter Hulme and Lesley Wylie) Surveying the American Tropics: A Literary Geography from New York to Rio, Liverpool University Press, 2013

    This collection presents essays by distinguished scholars engaging with the rich diversity of the writing produced within the American Tropics. The region shares a history in terms of its having been the battle ground for European colonial powers fighting indigenous populations and each other for control of land and resources, the arrival of millions of white Europeans and black Africans, and the development of its dominant socio-economic model (the plantation), whose effects lasted at least well into the twentieth century.

    Book cover image of Creating Yoknapatawpha

    Creating Yoknapatawpha, Readers and Writers in Faulkner's Fiction, Routledge, 2006

    Creating Yoknapatawpha is a study of the crucial interplay of reading and writing processes involved in constructing the textual environment of William Faulkner’s work, and the nature and significance of the world created by these many forces. Yoknapatawpha County, the author contends, is the product of these mainly mental processes of construction, and it is in the similar and even analogous situations that exist between readers and writers of and in the fiction that the dynamic of Faulkner’s work is discovered.

Film studies

  • Shohini Chaudhuri

    Book cover image of Cinema of the Dark Side

    Cinema of the Dark Side: Atrocity and the Ethics of Film Spectatorship, Edinburgh University Press, 2014

    Covering a diverse spectrum of 21st century cinema, Cinema of the Dark Side deals with documentary or fictional representations of atrocity such as state-sanctioned torture, genocide, enforced disappearance, deportation, and apartheid. Investigating cinema's ethical potential, the book argues that while films help to create and confirm normative perceptions about atrocities, they also disrupt those perceptions and build alternatives.

    Book cover image of Feminist Film Theorists

    Feminist Film Theorists, Routledge, 2006

    Focusing on the ground-breaking work of Laura Mulvey, Kaja Silverman, Teresa de Lauretis and Barbara Creed, this book explores how, since it began in the 1970s, feminist film theory has revolutionized the way that films and their spectators can be understood. Examining the new and distinctive approaches of each of these thinkers, this book provides the most detailed account so far of their ideas by illuminating six key concepts for film analysis, the male gaze, the female voice, technologies of gender, queering desire, the monstrous-feminine masculinity in crisis.

    Book cover image of Contemporary World Cinema

    Contemporary World Cinema, Europe, Middle East, East Asia, South Asia, Edinburgh University Press, 2005

    Since the start of the 1990s, despite tougher competition than ever before from Hollywood, a rebirth and flourishing of cinema has been taking place in parts of Europe, the Middle East, East Asia and South Asia. This book provides an overview of the cinemas of these regions, interpreting some of the recent developments as strategic responses to globalisation and highlighting transnational and cross-cultural structures, influences and themes.

  • Jeffrey Geiger

    Book cover image of Cinematicty in Media History

    Jeffrey Geiger (with Karin Littau) Cinematicity in Media History, Edinburgh University Press, Oxford University Press, 2013

    This collection focuses on the relations of cinema to other media, cultural productions, and diverse forms of entertainment, exploring these sometimes parallel and sometimes more densely intertwined histories. It makes visible the complex ways in which media anticipate, interfere with, and draw on one other, demonstrating how cinematicity makes itself felt in practices of seeing, reading, writing, and thinking both before and after the 'birth' of cinema.

    Book cover image of Film Analysis, a Norton Reader second edition

    Jeffrey Geiger (with R.L. Rutsky) Film Analysis: A Norton Reader (second expanded edition), W.W. Norton, 2013

    Film Analysis: A Norton Reader is particularly aimed at undergraduate students and brings together fifty essays on fifty films by a who’s-who of film studies. The Second Edition includes new essays, an extensive detailed guide to writing film analysis written by the editors, and a complete and up-to-date glossary of critical film terms.

    Book cover image of American Documentary Film

    American Documentary Film: Projecting the Nation, Edinburgh University Press, Columbia University Press, 2011

    This book examines how documentary films have contributed to the American public sphere - creating a kind of public space, serving as sites for community-building, public expression, and social innovation. Geiger focuses on how documentaries have been significant in forming ideas of the nation, both as an imagined space and a real place. Moving from the dawn of cinema to the present day, this is the first full-length study to focus on the extensive range and history of American non-fiction filmmaking.

    Book cover image of Facing the Pacific

    Facing the Pacific, University of Hawaii Press, 2007

    The enduring popularity of Polynesia in western literature, art, and film attests to the pleasures that Pacific islands have, over the centuries, afforded the consuming gaze of the west—connoting solitude, release from cares, and, more recently, self-renewal away from urbanized modern life. Facing the Pacific is the first study to offer a detailed look at the United States’ intense engagement with the myth of the South Seas just after the First World War, when, at home, a popular vogue for all things Polynesian seemed to echo the expansion of U.S. imperialist activities abroad.

    Book cover image of Film Analysis, a Norton Reader

    Jeffrey Geiger (with R.L. Rutsky) Film Analysis, a Norton Reader, Norton, 2007

    Written with undergraduate readers in mind, Film Analysis, a Norton Reader covers the central issues raised in today’s cinema courses and provide students with practical models to help them improve their own writing and film-analysis skills. Each essay is written exclusively for this text by a leading scholar and offers concise analyses of forty-four diverse, historically significant films.

     

  • John Haynes

    Cinema, State Socialism and Society in the Soviet Union 
			and Eastern Europe, 1917-1989

    John Haynes (with Sanja Bahun) Cinema, State Socialism and Society in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, 1917-1989, Routledge, 2014

    Cinema, State Socialism and Society in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, 1917-1989 - Re-Visions is a comprehensive re-examination of the cinemas of the Soviet Union and Central and Eastern Europe during the communist era. The book brings together contributions by nine scholars, including editors Professor Bajun and Dr Haynes, and argues that since the end of communism, we are able to view these cinemas in a way that is no longer bound by binary Cold War distinctions.

    Book cover image of New Soviet Man

    New Soviet Man: Gender and Masculinity in Stalinist Soviet Cinema, Manchester University Press, 2003

    This first full-length study of masculinity in Stalinist Soviet cinema examines the 'New Soviet Man' not only as an ideal of masculinity presented to Soviet cinemagoers, but also as a man in his specific, and hotly debated social, cultural and political context. A detailed analysis of Stalinist discourse sets the stage for an examination of the imagined relationship between the patriarch Stalin and his 'model sons' in the key genre cycles of the era: from the capital to the collective farms, and ultimately to the very borders of the Soviet state.

  • Eirini Konstantinidou

    Practicing theory: Mnemophrenia, Routledge, 2017

    A film-essay on the future of cinema and artificial memories; Mnemophrenia is a multi-generation-spanning anthology asking "what-if" about the impact of advanced virtual reality on human identity and society.

Journalism

  • Paul Anderson

    Major and the Labour Party, Biteback Publications, 2017

    Paul Anderson assesses the impact of the John Major administration on the Labour Party under Neil Kinnock, John Smith and Tony Blair. Major and the Labour Party is published as a chapter in Kevin Hickson and Ben Williams' John Major: An Unsuccessful Prime Minister?

    In defence of Bernard Crick, Peter Lang, 2015

    Paul Anderson's critical overview of recent accounts of George Orwell's politics In defence of Bernard Crick is published as a chapter in Richard Lance Keeble's George Orwell Now!


Film screenings

Film screenings

We have a dedicated 120-seat film theatre on campus and hold weekly film screenings introduced by our academic staff as well as talks by visiting film makers and showcases of students work.

Research Seminars

Dr mary mazzilli

Throughout the year our weekly Research Seminar series welcomes leading academic specialists, as well as writers, poets, playwrights, filmmakers and journalists to talk about their work.

Lakeside Theatre

Lakeside Theatre

Our University's Lakeside Theatre runs an exciting programme of plays, music, comedy and workshops, as well as offering voluntary and paid work experience opportunities to our students.

News and events

News and events

Check out our news and events section for the latest information about publications, research excellence, awards and achievements by our staff and students.